Zine Scene: Buffalo State Music Publications Preserved in New Digital Archive (Buffalo State College)

Buffalo State College: Zine Scene: Buffalo State Music Publications Preserved in New Digital Archive. “Long before music websites, blogs, and social media accounts provided a means of instant communication, fanzines—or zines—were one of the few ways for aspiring rock writers to get published. In the early to mid-1970s, Buffalo State College provided a supportive environment for students who embraced a do-it-yourself ethic to detail the burgeoning new music—punk, glam, and new wave—that was largely ignored by the mainstream press. With funding from United Students Government, two influential zines—the Shakin’ Street Gazette (SSG) and Foxtrot—were published and distributed throughout the city.”

Columbia News: Community Scholar’s Mixtape Museum Is an Ode to Hip-Hop

Columbia News: Community Scholar’s Mixtape Museum Is an Ode to Hip-Hop. “Fifteen years ago, Regan Sommer McCoy looked around at the collection of mixtapes, album cover art and music industry paraphernalia overflowing her boyfriend’s Bronx apartment and thought, ‘This place could be a museum.’ Now, as McCoy finishes her third year as a Columbia Community Scholar, her Mixtape Museum is a reality and she is preparing to join the advisory board of the Universal Hip Hop Museum as a historian when it opens in the Bronx in 2023.”

NewScientist: Humans across cultures may share the same universal musical grammar

NewScientist: Humans across cultures may share the same universal musical grammar. “While music seems to be everywhere, scientists haven’t previously found much evidence to suggest it has any universal features. The prevailing view is that music is so diverse that few, if any, universals exist. Settling the matter empirically has been difficult, because research often focuses on individual cultures and musical contexts, says Samuel Mehr of Harvard University. So Mehr and his colleagues decided to use data science to try to understand what was universal and what varied in music across the world. To do this, they developed a database containing around 5000 detailed descriptions of songs and their performances in 60 human societies.”

MEL Magazine: An Oral History of LimeWire: The Little App That Changed the Music Industry Forever

MEL Magazine: An Oral History of LimeWire: The Little App That Changed the Music Industry Forever. “In 2001, the internet’s premier file-sharing service Napster was shut down after just two years, leaving a giant vacuum in the ever-expanding peer-to-peer file-sharing space. There was, however, no putting the toothpaste back into the tube. Suddenly, it was possible — and extremely popular — to download media for free. It was only a matter of time before the next platform emerged to meet that demand.”

Pitchfork: Red Bull Music Academy, Which Shuts Down This Week, Shares Archive With Over 500 Lectures

Pitchfork: Red Bull Music Academy, Which Shuts Down This Week, Shares Archive With Over 500 Lectures. “The archive contains over 500 RBMA lectures, as well as interviews, features, videos, and more. RBMA, which launched back in 1998, has hosted SOPHIE, Flying Lotus, Nina Kraviz, Objekt, and so many more.” Some other names I saw as I scrolled through the list: Bootsy Collins, Brian Eno, Chuck D, Debbie Harry, Harry Belafonte, Iggy Pop, Laurie Anderson, Sheila E.

Rock ‘n’ roll, clowns, and Roberta Flack: An inside look at a massive new collection of music photography at The Bancroft Library (Berkeley Library News)

Berkeley Library News: Rock ‘n’ roll, clowns, and Roberta Flack: An inside look at a massive new collection of music photography at The Bancroft Library. “Looking through the photographs is like flipping through stacks of vinyl at Amoeba Music, a satisfying exercise in nostalgia. Scanning through the folders, you’ll see Judy Collins, Elvis Costello, Bonnie Raitt, Neil Young, and so many in between… The photographs, 60,000 in all, make up the Howard Brainen photo archive. A recent gift to Bancroft, the archive is a time machine into a moment in music history, offering a glimpse into the local scene and the larger-than-life figures who came through the Bay Area.” It’s worth reading the article just to see the pictures included with it.