MEL Magazine: An Oral History of LimeWire: The Little App That Changed the Music Industry Forever

MEL Magazine: An Oral History of LimeWire: The Little App That Changed the Music Industry Forever. “In 2001, the internet’s premier file-sharing service Napster was shut down after just two years, leaving a giant vacuum in the ever-expanding peer-to-peer file-sharing space. There was, however, no putting the toothpaste back into the tube. Suddenly, it was possible — and extremely popular — to download media for free. It was only a matter of time before the next platform emerged to meet that demand.”

Pitchfork: Red Bull Music Academy, Which Shuts Down This Week, Shares Archive With Over 500 Lectures

Pitchfork: Red Bull Music Academy, Which Shuts Down This Week, Shares Archive With Over 500 Lectures. “The archive contains over 500 RBMA lectures, as well as interviews, features, videos, and more. RBMA, which launched back in 1998, has hosted SOPHIE, Flying Lotus, Nina Kraviz, Objekt, and so many more.” Some other names I saw as I scrolled through the list: Bootsy Collins, Brian Eno, Chuck D, Debbie Harry, Harry Belafonte, Iggy Pop, Laurie Anderson, Sheila E.

Rock ‘n’ roll, clowns, and Roberta Flack: An inside look at a massive new collection of music photography at The Bancroft Library (Berkeley Library News)

Berkeley Library News: Rock ‘n’ roll, clowns, and Roberta Flack: An inside look at a massive new collection of music photography at The Bancroft Library. “Looking through the photographs is like flipping through stacks of vinyl at Amoeba Music, a satisfying exercise in nostalgia. Scanning through the folders, you’ll see Judy Collins, Elvis Costello, Bonnie Raitt, Neil Young, and so many in between… The photographs, 60,000 in all, make up the Howard Brainen photo archive. A recent gift to Bancroft, the archive is a time machine into a moment in music history, offering a glimpse into the local scene and the larger-than-life figures who came through the Bay Area.” It’s worth reading the article just to see the pictures included with it.

Punk News: Massive East Bay Punk digital archive released

Punk News: Massive East Bay Punk digital archive released. “Stefano Morello has curated and launched a massive digital archive of east Bay Punk materials. The site includes many zines from the time period and a few other materials.” East Bay in this case is apparently the San Francisco Bay area. Sounds like punk there is quite a thing.

Washingtonian: How Can We Preserve Go-Go’s History?

Washingtonian: How Can We Preserve Go-Go’s History?. “This spring, noise complaints forced a Shaw retailer to turn off the go-go recordings that had played in front of his store for more than two decades. The outcry was fast and intense, and in the wake of protests and a #DontMuteDC hashtag started by a Howard student, the music was eventually allowed to return. One intriguing piece of news that came from the coverage: The store’s owner, Donald Campbell, wants to launch a digital streaming platform to share the thousands of hours of live go-go recordings he’s amassed over the years—probably the biggest such collection in existence.” When I saw “go-go,” all I could think of was the 60s and those white go-go boots that used to be popular. This ain’t that. Looking into it further, go-go reminded me of the early rap I grew up with, mixed in with funk and lots of drums. I liked it. If you want to explore, 8tracks has a bunch of playlists.