DeadHead Web App Streams Grateful Dead Concerts from Internet Archive On Demand

Spotted via my IFTTT/Reddit alerts: a new Web-based streaming app for live Grateful Dead concerts. There’s not a lot of documentation for site but it’s basic: looks like the concerts are arranged by year starting in 1965. (The site is powered by concerts in the Internet Archive.) Click on a one of the squares representing a concert and you’ll get a list of tracks with their duration. You can jump directly to specific tracks. Click play on a track and you’ll get a player at the bottom of the screen. No-frills but certainly functional.

Beat: Courtney Barnett launches interactive new website for fans to customise her music

Beat: Courtney Barnett launches interactive new website for fans to customise her music. “Today, Courtney Barnett launches the video for ‘Before You Gotta Go’, taken from her forthcoming album Things Take Time, Take Time – out November 12 via Milk! Records / Remote Control Records. In order to give fans and music-lovers more insight into the creative process behind Things Take Time, Take Time, Barnett today also launched an interactive website which allows the listener to isolate, mute and mix different instruments and vocal-parts of these recordings.”

BusinessWire: The Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation® Opens Applications for the 2022 Research and Preservation Grants Program (PRESS RELEASE)

BusinessWire: The Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation® Opens Applications for the 2022 Research and Preservation Grants Program (PRESS RELEASE). “The Latin GRAMMY Cultural Foundation® announced that applications are officially open for its 2022 Research and Preservation Grants program. The program provides four grants each year to music institutions, musicologists, researchers, nonprofit organizations and individuals around the world who are enhancing and preserving Latin music heritage.”

Clevescene: Clevelander Franklin Fantini Is Archiving and Sharing Country Music’s Odd and Forgotten Past With ‘Dollar Country WTFC’ Radio Show

Clevescene: Clevelander Franklin Fantini Is Archiving and Sharing Country Music’s Odd and Forgotten Past With ‘Dollar Country WTFC’ Radio Show. “From a makeshift studio in his suburban Cleveland basement filled with a collection of 1,500 .45 RPM vinyl records, Franklin Fantini — a self-made, DIY purveyor of ten-cent wax — has for the last five years been broadcasting Dollar Country WTFC every week. The hour-long online radio show hosted by Frank — Frank the Drifter, as he introduces himself — features a curated tracklist of 18 songs handpicked from his shelves.”

Wired: What Makes an Artist in the Age of Algorithms?

Wired: What Makes an Artist in the Age of Algorithms?. “BT, the Grammy-nominated composer of 2010’s These Hopeful Machines, has emerged as a world leader at the intersection of tech and music…. This past spring, BT released GENESIS.JSON, a piece of software that contains 24 hours of original music and visual art. It features 15,000 individually sequenced audio and video clips that he created from scratch, which span different rhythmic figures, field recordings of cicadas and crickets, a live orchestra, drum machines, and myriad other sounds that play continuously. And it lives on the blockchain. It is, to my knowledge, the first composition of its kind.”

The Conversation: Virtual exhibition breathes life into Lesotho’s musical tradition and clay art

The Conversation: Virtual exhibition breathes life into Lesotho’s musical tradition and clay art. “The start of the news broadcast on Radio Lesotho is signalled by an unforgettable vibrating sound, rather harsh, as if made by a large bird. This is the lesiba, a musical bow. The lesiba was played by boys and men as they herded cattle, before radios and cellphones began to take the place of the national musical instrument. Nowadays, there is little apparent concern for maintaining interest in the lesiba at school or any other national level in Lesotho. The unique sound of the instrument – once evocative of a rural way of life – seems to exist in a disconnected, disembodied fashion on the radio.”

TechCrunch: Spotify playlist curators complain about ongoing abuse that favors bad actors over innocent parties

TechCrunch: Spotify playlist curators complain about ongoing abuse that favors bad actors over innocent parties. “Currently, playlists created by Spotify users can be reported in the app for a variety of reasons — like sexual, violent, dangerous, deceptive or hateful content, among other things. When a report is submitted, the playlist in question will have its metadata immediately removed, including its title, description and custom image. There is no internal review process that verifies the report is legitimate before the metadata is removed.”

TechCrunch: TikTok and Snap alums launch mayk.it, a social music creation app, with $4M in seed funding

TechCrunch: TikTok and Snap alums launch mayk.it, a social music creation app, with $4M in seed funding. “Mayk.it wants to help people easily produce, own and share music that they can create using just their phone. Users can upload their own beat or select an existing beat from another user, then add vocals (voice effects and somewhat corny lyric generators are available if you’re shy), and then add a visual from Giphy. Once you make (or, ‘mayk’) something, you can post it on the app, where other users can see it via a discovery page, which categorizes music by feeling or theme, rather than genre.”

“What Song Is This?”: The Best Ways to Identify a Song Online (Make Tech Easier)

Make Tech Easier: “What Song Is This?”: The Best Ways to Identify a Song Online . “It happens to all of us, a song gets stuck in your head, and no matter how hard you think about it, you just can’t remember what the name of the song. Fortunately, there are plenty of ways to help you identify music that feels like it’s on the tip of your tongue. Between voice assistants, apps like Shazam and other methods, you will never have an issue identifying a song again.”

Mashable: Philips Hue smart lights can now react to your Spotify songs

Mashable: Philips Hue smart lights can now react to your Spotify songs. “On Wednesday, Signify — a Philips spinoff that manufactures lighting products — announced that Philips Hue lightbulbs are now integrated with Spotify. This includes an algorithm that analyzes the metadata of each song you play on the music streaming platform, in real time, in order to make the lights ‘dance’ to the music.”

USC Viterbi School of Engineering: Is it A Horror Film or a Rom-Com? AI Can Predict Based Solely on Music.

USC Viterbi School of Engineering: Is it A Horror Film or a Rom-Com? AI Can Predict Based Solely on Music.. “[Professor Shrikanth] Narayanan and team’s study was the first to apply deep learning models to the music used in a film to see if a computer could predict the genre of a film based on the soundtrack alone. They found that these models were able to accurately classify a film’s genre using machine learning, supporting the notion that musical features can be powerful indicators in how we perceive different films.”

NME: Kid Rock says “over half” of his band have tested positive for COVID

NME: Kid Rock says “over half” of his band have tested positive for COVID. “Kid Rock has said that several members of his band have tested positive for coronavirus, forcing him to cancel a handful of upcoming live dates. While Rock – real name Bob Ritchie – reported that ‘over half’ of the band had tested positive, the rap-rock artist confirmed that his tests had come back negative – and that “many of them” within the group had been vaccinated, including himself.”

Slashgear: Researchers say putting masks on instruments reduces COVID risk

Slashgear: Researchers say putting masks on instruments reduces COVID risk. “Putting a mask on certain instruments can effectively reduce the spread of COVID-19 similar to wearing a face mask, according to a new study from the University of Colorado at Boulder. The researchers focused on three different possible ways to mitigate COVID-19 spread when playing brass, woodwind, and reed instruments, including putting masks on them.”