It’s time to turn up the music: Watch The BRITs LIVE with Ed Sheeran, Dua Lipa, Stormzy, and Justin Timberlake on YouTube (YouTube Blog)

YouTube: It’s time to turn up the music: Watch The BRITs LIVE with Ed Sheeran, Dua Lipa, Stormzy, and Justin Timberlake on YouTube. “Do you remember the BRITs, where Ed Sheeran famously brought Stormzy out to perform, Adele showed us that she doesn’t like being rushed, and Ginger Spice unveiled her iconic Union Jack dress? It’s almost time for the action to begin again as the excitement of The BRIT Awards 2018 is almost upon us. What memorable pop culture moments will this year bring? We’re letting you in on all the fun as we’re streaming the BRITs right here live for the fifth year running. “

Cornell: Scientists, wildlife DJ, hip-hop archivists create ‘BeastBox’

Cornell: Scientists, wildlife DJ, hip-hop archivists create ‘BeastBox’. “Musicians have long drawn inspiration from nature, but a new online game is taking that connection one step further. ‘Beastbox’ takes sound clips from real wild animals, transforms them into loops, and allows users to mix and match them into an endless variety of beats, breaks and drops. Along the way, players learn about the animals and the ecosystems they belong to.”

“The internet is a devastating wasteland”: How social media could be making musicians sick (Fact Magazine)

Fact Magazine: “The internet is a devastating wasteland”: How social media could be making musicians sick. “Making and sharing music has never been more accessible than it is right now. Even as listeners, we know this: we can get our music on Bandcamp and SoundCloud, no major labels required. But along with the access to technology and the unprecedented ability to share music with people anywhere in the world, the emotional baggage that can come with fame can plague even the smallest independent artist.”

Twitter tool turns your tweets into an ever-evolving playlist: What’s your Twitter soundtrack? (Alphr)

Alphr: Twitter tool turns your tweets into an ever-evolving playlist: What’s your Twitter soundtrack?. “Called Social Song, the tool lets you type any Twitter username into it before analysing tweets based on the use of emoji, use of words that convey a certain sentiment (such as happiness or anger), and images that contain certain facial expressions.” This is a nice idea, but every time I tried a different Twitter handle I got music that sounded like the soundtrack of an establishing shot for a Lifetime movie set in New England.

Google Blog: Introducing the new Google Play Music

Google Blog: Introducing the new Google Play Music. “Whether reminding you to leave to catch your flight, helping you find pictures of your daughter’s recital, or suggesting the right Smart Reply, Google builds tools that help you make the world of information more accessible and useful. And at Google Play Music, we strive for the same. Building on our commitment to help you find the right music for any moment, today we’re introducing the new Google Play Music — a fresh take on our music streaming service that is smarter, easier to use, and much more assistive.”

Kansas State Collegian: K-State Libraries donate thousands of records to digital archive

Kansas State Collegian: K-State Libraries donate thousands of records to digital archive. “Faculty in K-State special collections department knew of The Great 78 Project before getting involved, [Keli] Rylance said. During the 2016-2017 academic year, faculty combed through their collections and decided two would be good candidates for the project. Rylance then contacted the project’s developer at the Archive of Contemporary Music in New York to arrange a partnership. Since then, students have joined faculty in preparing the nearly 8,000 sides of audio for shipment to George Blood, an audio and visual digitisation company in Philadelphia.”

Techdirt: Study Suggests Shutting Down Filesharing Sites Would Hurt Music Industry, New Artists

Techdirt: Study Suggests Shutting Down Filesharing Sites Would Hurt Music Industry, New Artists. “… there has been an update to a study first publicized as a work in progress several years ago run by the Information Economics and Policy Journal out of Queen’s University. Based on that study, it looks like attempts to shut down filesharing sites would not just be ineffectual, but disastrous for both the music industry as a whole and especially new and smaller-ticket artists. The most popular artists, on the other hand, tend to be more hurt by piracy than helped. That isn’t to be ignored, but we must keep in mind that the purpose of copyright law is to get more art created for the benefit of the public and it seems obvious that the public most benefits from a larger successful music ecosystem as opposed to simply getting more albums from the largest audiences.”