Ars Technica: YouTube demonetized my tuba videos (also, I make tuba videos)

Ars Technica: YouTube demonetized my tuba videos (also, I make tuba videos). “Early in 2018, YouTube made changes to how us commoners can earn money through its Partner Program (or ‘YPP’). You probably heard about it here and, oh yeah, here. Now seems like a good time to describe my own (less tumultuous) history with YPP.”

Library of Congress: Library Launches Leonard Bernstein Centennial Celebration with Thousands of Bernstein Items Online

Library of Congress: Library Launches Leonard Bernstein Centennial Celebration with Thousands of Bernstein Items Online. “In celebration of the 100th anniversary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth, the Library of Congress has made available online—for the first time—musical manuscripts and scrapbooks from the legendary composer’s personal and professional archives housed in the nation’s library. … The public can now access for free more than 3,700 items, including photos, writings, correspondence, scripts, musical sketches, scrapbooks and audio recordings. This web presentation is a revealing snapshot of Bernstein’s extensive collection at the Library.”

Tubefilters: YouTube To Stream Coachella For Eighth Year, Including Headliner Beyoncé

Tubefilter: YouTube To Stream Coachella For Eighth Year, Including Headliner Beyoncé. “For the eighth year running, YouTube will serve as the exclusive livestreaming partner for the music festival’s first weekend of performances — which includes headliner Beyoncé as well as Cardi B, The Weeknd, Post Malone, The War On Drugs, and more. “

Rock107: Handwriting by John Lennon, David Bowie & other music legends turned into downloadable fonts

Rock107: Handwriting by John Lennon, David Bowie & other music legends turned into downloadable fonts. “The new website is offering downloadable fonts based on the handwriting of several well-known late artists, including Lennon, Bowie, late Nirvana frontman Kurt Cobain, Leonard Cohen and French singer-songwriter Serge Gainsbourg.”

Yivo Launches The Ruth Rubin Legacy: An Online Sound Archive Of Yiddish Folksongs (YIVO Institute for Jewish Research)

YIVO Institute for Jewish Research: Yivo Launches The Ruth Rubin Legacy: An Online Sound Archive Of Yiddish Folksongs. “The YIVO Institute for Jewish Research (YIVO) announces the launch of a new online-exhibition highlighting the field recordings of over 1,500 Yiddish lider (songs) made by renowned vocalist and scholar, Ruth Rubin. Performed by some of the most extraordinary traditional singers of the 20th century, including Rubin herself, the 78rpm acetate discs, reel-to-reel tapes and cassettes recorded by Rubin between 1946 and the 1970s have been painstakingly re-assembled and are made accessible in an easy to use online platform for the first time. In addition to a state of the art search portal in which field recordings can be browsed by song title, genre, performer, and more, the exhibition includes a variety of materials including lectures, concerts, radio interviews, videos, and rare and unpublished manuscripts, photographs, and more.”

Lifehacker: How to Find New Music You’ll Actually Like

Posted for the weekend, from Lifehacker: How to Find New Music You’ll Actually Like. “Some people can dig up great music like magic, or have friends inside the industry who keep them updated. Some people are contented with their weekly Spotify Discover playlist. But if you need more ways to find music, here are 50 ideas, taken from Twitter users, my colleagues at Lifehacker’s publisher Gizmodo Media Group, and some of my own habits. Some are obvious, some bizarre, some embarrassing, but they’ve all helped people find their new favorite song, or even their favorite band.”

The Internet Archive: The Music Modernization Act is Bad for the Preservation of Sound Recordings

The Internet Archive: The Music Modernization Act is Bad for the Preservation of Sound Recordings. “There’s a bill working its way through Congress called the Music Modernization Act (the current bill is a mix of several bills, the portion we are concerned with was formerly called the CLASSICS Act) that has us very concerned about the fate of historical sound recordings. As currently drafted, this bill would vastly expand the rights of performers of pre-1972 sound recordings, without any provision for a public domain for these works or meaningful fair use and library exceptions. After a visit to Washington DC meeting with various Congressional staffers working on this issue, we do not believe that the CLASSICS portion of the bill will be fixed. We therefore oppose the CLASSICS portion of the Music Modernization Act.”