MakeUseOf: How to Identify Music and Songs in YouTube Videos

MakeUseOf: How to Identify Music and Songs in YouTube Videos. “It’s a common situation. You are happily watching a video on YouTube, perhaps a commercial or a movie trailer, and it has a catchy song playing in the background. You want to know what the music is, but how do you find out? Identifying some music and songs is easy, while others require a little more persistence. But thanks to this step-by-step walkthrough, you are (almost) guaranteed to identify any music or songs you hear online. All you need is a little time and patience.”

Open Culture: Hear Singers from the Metropolitan Opera Record Their Voices on Traditional Wax Cylinders

Open Culture: Hear Singers from the Metropolitan Opera Record Their Voices on Traditional Wax Cylinders. “Vinyl is back in a big way. Music lovers who booted their record collections during the compact disc’s approximately 15 year reign are scrambling to replace their old favorites, even in the age of streaming. They can’t get enough of that warm analog sound. Can a wax cylinder revival be far behind?”

RappNews: Hallberg set to make beautiful music at Sperryville dulcimer museum

RappNews: Hallberg set to make beautiful music at Sperryville dulcimer museum. “[John] Hallberg, 53, of Jenkins Hollow in Sperryville, had never played the dulcimer before then, but easily got hooked. He’s never taken lessons, but says the dulcimer is easy to learn to play and he’s learned to play by ear. Twenty years later he owns what he calls one of the world’s best collections of Appalachian dulcimers, numbering more than 60 instruments.” He is planning both an online and an offline museum.

The Register: Oomm-tsss, oomm-tsss, Oomm-tsss, oomm-tsss… it’s an AI beatbox

The Register: Oomm-tsss, oomm-tsss, Oomm-tsss, oomm-tsss… it’s an AI beatbox. “Vid AI can now beatbox for you for hours on end using your voice, if you’re into that kind of thing. Nao Tokui – a visiting associate professor at Kyushu University in California and a CEO of Qosmo, an AI and music startup – has developed a neural-network-based system that collects about 20 seconds of any sound to produce a custom drum kit, and then automatically sequences rhythms using those utterances and noises.”

Google Blog: For Louis Armstrong’s birthday we tune in to ‘Tiger Rag’ on a Gramophone

Google Blog: For Louis Armstrong’s birthday we tune in to ‘Tiger Rag’ on a Gramophone. “To mark the birthday of Louis Armstrong 117 years ago, Google Arts & Culture and the record label Deutsche Grammophon teamed up to restore and digitize phonograph records like ‘Tiger Rag’ from the label’s archive, and to tell the story of Emile Berliner, who invented the grammophon player and records that brought the music of Armstrong and many other artists to the masses.”

Billboard: New Study Shows Close Relationship Between Social Media & Music

Billboard: New Study Shows Close Relationship Between Social Media & Music. “A new study released Monday (Aug. 6) found that nine out of 10 social media users do a music-related activity within the framework of an app, according to data compiled by research and analysis firm MusicWatch. The data was compiled in April via a survey of 800 people who use one of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or Snapchat at least once a month, with the majority of those users engaging with social media daily.”

Mixmag: 75 Global Rave Flyers From The Largest Flyer Archive In The World

New-to-me but apparently online since 2013: an online archive of rave flyers. “The largest archive of independently collected rave flyers in the world is tucked away in the mountains of Oregon, taken care of by a man named Matthew Johnson. Starting The Rave Preservation Project back in 2013, Johnson has amassed a collection of over 40,000 pieces of rave memorabilia from the mid-‘80s, ‘90s and early 2000s. Including duplicates, there are over 250,000 pieces stored in the archive. “