Flood Magazine: Black Bandcamp Relaunches as Black Artist Database Ahead of Bandcamp Friday

Flood Magazine: Black Bandcamp Relaunches as Black Artist Database Ahead of Bandcamp Friday. “Bandcamp Fridays have become sort of a musical holiday amidst the pandemic. With musicians at a major loss of income without live performances, Bandcamp has scheduled specific days where 100 percent of proceeds go toward the artist, waiving the site’s revenue share. Not only has the past year made clear how unprepared people were for a plague (I mean, who is?), more importantly it revealed the growing inequity in the world and how racism, sexism, and other intersectional factors are at play. This is all to preface the good work of the community-based platform Black Bandcamp, which has now officially relaunched as Black Artist Database, or B.A.D.”

Glasgow Times: New online database resource tracks fiddle music origins

Glasgow Times: New online database resource tracks fiddle music origins. “A NEW online resource dedicated to finding some of the oldest Scottish fiddle music has launched. The searchable online database, which was created as part of PhD research at the University of Glasgow, will allow users to find original sources of tunes, as well as track information regarding the creators and collectors of the songs.”

World Economic Forum: This innovative project fuses journalism and music to highlight lawlessness at sea

World Economic Forum: This innovative project fuses journalism and music to highlight lawlessness at sea. ” All of that time spent at sea allowed me to build an audio library of field recordings. It featured a variety of textured and rhythmic sounds like machine-gun fire off the coast of Somalia and chanting captive deckhands on the South China Sea. Using the sound archive and inspired by the reporting, over 400 artists from more than 60 countries are producing EPs in their own interpretive musical styles, be it electronic, ambient, classical or hip-hop. Many artists also used the reported footage to make their own videos tied to their song, including Louis Futon, Roger Molls, and De Osos.” This is really good. Major timesink.

Crack: DJ and Intervention founder Ifeoluwa is launching a digital archive for underground music

Crack: DJ and Intervention founder Ifeoluwa is launching a digital archive for underground music. “Taking to Twitter, Ifeoluwa – real name Yewande Adeniran – wrote, ‘Hi everyone! I’m starting a digital archive for underground dance / experimental music. I’m looking for people to submit their favourite DJs, producers and composers, both established and newcomers, sesh stories, best night outs, photos and any memorabilia. From any year!’”

Google Blog: A DJ’s mission to tell Asian American stories, track by track

Google Blog: A DJ’s mission to tell Asian American stories, track by track. “The Asian American community has faced erasure from popular American narratives and history, and are largely absent from mainstream American media. Partly because of this, Asians in America are seen as a monolith. ‘When I grew up, being Asian wasn’t something that most of us were told to be proud of,’ Richie says. This is why Richie spent over a year building TRAKTIVIST.com, a discovery platform dedicated to helping people find music made by Asian North Americans. TRAKTIVIST.com’s catalog also allows people to search for music by filtering ethnicity, instrument, genre and playlists.”

From Courtney Barnett to Neil Young: The Wild, Wonderful World of Internet Music Archives (InsideHook)

InsideHook: From Courtney Barnett to Neil Young: The Wild, Wonderful World of Internet Music Archives. “For just about as long as the internet’s been around, there have been websites devoted to archiving a particular band’s touring history. In the early days, most of them were run by fans of jam bands like The Grateful Dead or Phish; for a genre where no two performances of any given song are exactly alike, it made sense that fans would need a place to help them track down a particular live performance, swap bootlegs or peruse decades of setlists. But in recent years, many musicians — including plenty who exist entirely outside of the jam scene — have taken matters into their own hands and launched their own online archives.”

Shining down: Doreen Ketchens releases two new albums (NOLA Gambit)

NOLA Gambit: Shining down: Doreen Ketchens releases two new albums. “Clarinetist and vocalist Doreen Ketchens has aimed to release an album every year since the mid-’90s — and occasionally has hit two or even three releases. The plan going into 2020 was to keep up the pace when she and her band, Doreen’s Jazz New Orleans, booked studio time in February and started working on the new recordings. Of course, no one’s plans worked out in 2020.” The first time I heard Doreen Ketchens play clarinet was on a YouTube video. I wanted to run down the street and knock on people’s doors and tell them about this brilliant clarinetist. Do yourself a favor and listen to her play and sing “When the Saints Go Marching In”.

Writing songs in lockdown: ‘It was an escape’ (BBC)

BBC: Writing songs in lockdown: ‘It was an escape’. “Now That’s What I Call Lockdown is a collection of songs and music written by BBC Radio 5 Live listeners. The aim was ‘to build the ultimate lockdown playlist, a chance for listeners of all standards, amateur and professional, to hear their music played out on the radio,’ said presenter Chris Warburton. The songs cover themes that resonate with the times – loneliness and loss, but also hope for the future, reunions and love.”

New York Times: Streaming Saved Music. Artists Hate It.

New York Times: Streaming Saved Music. Artists Hate It.. “My colleague Ben Sisario says that musicians complain about streaming economics that can translate millions of clicks on their songs into pennies for them. Last week, a group of musicians protested outside Spotify offices for changes in how they are paid from streaming. Ben spoke with me about why streaming music has been a letdown for many musicians. The challenges reflect a larger question: What happens when the promise of making a living online from music, writing or building apps doesn’t match the reality?”

Culture .pl: Penderecki’s Garden, A Digital Project Celebrating the Life & Legacy of Krzysztof Penderecki, Opens a Year After His Death

Culture .pl: Penderecki’s Garden, A Digital Project Celebrating the Life & Legacy of Krzysztof Penderecki, Opens a Year After His Death. “Penderecki’s Garden is a virtual, interactive space inspired by the work of Krzysztof Penderecki, one of Poland’s most celebrated composers, who passed away on 29th March 2020. Through the virtual garden’s layout, architectural structures and vegetation, audiences are invited to explore the life of Penderecki alongside compositions, inspirations and poems.”

Illinois News Bureau: Illinois researchers to digitally preserve history of live musical performances, including Krannert Center events

Illinois News Bureau: Illinois researchers to digitally preserve history of live musical performances, including Krannert Center events. “‘The Internet of Musical Events: Digital Scholarship, Community, and the Archiving of Performances,’ known as InterMusE, aims to preserve access to the record of historical live musical performances through digital archiving of concert ephemera such as programs and posters. It also will collect oral history interviews with concertgoers.”

Library of Congress: National Recording Registry Adds ‘Rhythm Nation’ Among 25 New Selections

Library of Congress: National Recording Registry Adds ‘Rhythm Nation’ Among 25 New Selections. “Janet Jackson’s clarion call for action and healing in ‘Rhythm Nation 1814’ now joins other groundbreaking sounds of history and culture among the latest titles inducted into the National Recording Registry of the Library of Congress, including Louis Armstrong’s ‘When the Saints Go Marching In,’ Labelle’s ‘Lady Marmalade,’ Nas’ ‘Illmatic,’ Kool & the Gang’s ‘Celebration,’ and Kermit the Frog’s ‘The Rainbow Connection.’”

The Irish News: Music composed and recorded during lockdown to be preserved by British Library

The Irish News: Music composed and recorded during lockdown to be preserved by British Library. “People who composed and recorded music during lockdown are being given the opportunity to have their songs preserved in the British Library. BBC Radio 5 Live said it has been inundated with tracks from musicians ‘of all standards’ from across the UK. The station is giving listeners the chance to have the music they created behind closed doors to be stored forever in the Sound Archive of the library.”