Covid and a coup: The double crisis pushing Myanmar to the brink (BBC)

BBC: Covid and a coup: The double crisis pushing Myanmar to the brink. “On 1 February, Myanmar’s military seized power from its civilian government, leading to a series of mass protests that show no signs of stopping. Among the protesters were thousands of healthcare workers who walked out, leading to a collapse in the healthcare system and throwing Myanmar’s vaccination and testing response into chaos. And now, a surge in coronavirus cases fuelled by the highly infectious Delta variant has dealt the country a fresh blow.”

The Citizen (Tanzania): The UN’s refugee data shame, and what needs to be done

The Citizen (Tanzania): The UN’s refugee data shame, and what needs to be done. “Back in 2017, I wrote of the risks of the UN’s refugee agency, UNHCR, collecting biometric registration data from Rohingya refugees, noting that the data could be used to drive unwilling repatriation; that collecting such data may make refugees believe their access to aid depends upon providing such data; and that – once collected or shared – such biometric data is virtually impossible to get rid of. Nearly four years later, a report from Human Rights Watch (HRW) says these worst-case scenarios have come true: A detailed database of the Rohingya refugee population has been handed over to Myanmar’s government, which drove them across the border into Bangladesh almost four years ago.”

Rights group: Facebook amplified Myanmar military propaganda (Washington Post)

Washington Post: Rights group: Facebook amplified Myanmar military propaganda. “Facebook’s recommendation algorithm amplifies military propaganda and other material that breaches the company’s own policies in Myanmar following a military takeover in February, a new report by the rights group Global Witness says. A month after the military seized power in Myanmar and imprisoned elected leaders, Facebook’s algorithms were still prompting users to view and ‘like’ pro-military pages with posts that incited and threatened violence, pushed misinformation that could lead to physical harm, praised the military and glorified its abuses, Global Witness said in the report, published late Tuesday.”

Songs, stories, pottery: Refugees preserve their heritage in digital archives (Thomson Reuters Foundation)

Thomson Reuters Foundation: Songs, stories, pottery: Refugees preserve their heritage in digital archives. “Solima Khatun has been a refugee six times in her long life. She first left her home in Myanmar during the Second World War, and most recently in 2017 – when relatives had to carry her as they fled to Bangladesh with nearly one million other Rohingyas…. Khatun’s story – along with pictures of her and her loda – are among scores of exhibits featured in the Rohingya Cultural Memory Centre (RCMC), a new digital archive of the art, literature and treasured belongings of refugees in Cox’s Bazar.”

NIKKEI Asia: Myanmar junta targets 100 celebrities active on social media

NIKKEI Asia: Myanmar junta targets 100 celebrities active on social media. “Myanmar’s junta has placed at least 100 celebrities on its wanted list for allegedly inciting protests against its seizure of power, taking aim at those with big social media followings. Since Friday, the nightly news on state television has named 20 prominent figures accused of violating the law. The list is later reprinted the next day in a government-controlled newspaper. The list swelled to 100 on Tuesday night.”

Voice of America: Global TB Fight Set Back 12 Years by COVID Pandemic, Doctors Warn

Voice of America: Global TB Fight Set Back 12 Years by COVID Pandemic, Doctors Warn. “In nine countries with a high prevalence of TB — including Bangladesh, India, Indonesia, Myanmar, Pakistan, Philippines, South Africa, Tajikistan and Ukraine — diagnosis and treatment fell by an average of 23%, according to analysis by the Stop TB Partnership, a non-profit hosted by the United Nations in Geneva.”

Rest of World: TikTok is repeating Facebook’s mistakes in Myanmar

Rest of World: TikTok is repeating Facebook’s mistakes in Myanmar. “Activists and experts told Rest of World that TikTok’s failures were distressingly familiar to anyone acquainted with how Facebook was used to help drive an ethnic-cleansing campaign in Myanmar in the 2010s. Members of the Myanmar military, known as the Tatmadaw, spread misinformation across the platform, stoking division, hatred, and, eventually, violence. In 2018, United Nations human rights experts said that unchecked hate speech on Facebook contributed to the genocide against the country’s Rohingya minority.”

Commentary: Social media worsens growing anti-China sentiments in Southeast Asia (Channel News Asia)

Channel News Asia: Commentary: Social media worsens growing anti-China sentiments in Southeast Asia. “It might be easy to dismiss the Milk Tea Alliance as a Gen-Z Internet joke. But the meme is successful in tapping into something deeper in the collective consciousness of a region that is famously diverse and defiant of collective action. It taps into discontent with the regional decline of democracy and fears about the rise of China as a hegemonic power. There is a bigger picture beyond the protests in Myanmar. The country fits a broader pattern of recent years in which disparate protests in Southeast Asia, triggered by different events, exhibit undercurrents of anxiety about the growing influence of China.”

Euronews: Myanmar has endured more than a month of nightly internet shutdowns

Euronews: Myanmar has endured more than a month of nightly internet shutdowns. “Myanmar has endured nightly internet shutdowns for more than a month as anti-coup demonstrations continue. Since the military seized power and detained elected leaders on February 1, at least 149 people have been killed, according to the UN. On Tuesday night, internet access in Myanmar was shut down for the 31st consecutive night, according to internet monitoring service Netblocks.”

GlobalVoices: Myanmar illustrators unite to distribute protest art for free

GlobalVoices: Myanmar illustrators unite to distribute protest art for free. “A group of 30 artists from Myanmar uploaded more than a hundred protest posters… for free print and use by those rallying against the military coup….The collective noticed that protesters were bringing placards with the illustrators’ art to demonstrations, and indeed many artists had shared their poster designs online for free.”

EXPLAINER: Why is Facebook banning Myanmar military pages? (AP)

AP: EXPLAINER: Why is Facebook banning Myanmar military pages?. “Facebook announced Thursday that it is removing all remaining Myanmar military and military-controlled pages from its site and from Instagram, which it also owns. It said it will also block advertising from military-linked businesses. The decision follows a Feb. 1 coup in which the military removed elected leaders from power and jailed others.”

Business Insider: Google has pulled down a propaganda blog backing the military coup in Myanmar after outcry by online activists

Business Insider: Google has pulled down a propaganda blog backing the military coup in Myanmar after outcry by online activists. “Google has pulled down a propaganda blog supporting the military coup in Myanmar after the blog was discovered by an online activist this week. The blog was managed and hosted via the Google-owned Blogger platform under the URL seniorgeneralminaunghlaing.com, taking its name from the Myanmar military leader who has seized control of the country.”