CNET: Early MySpace Was the Peak of Social Media

CNET: Early MySpace Was the Peak of Social Media. “Founded in 2003, MySpace was the first social media platform for many people. Facebook was founded a year later, and despite its early restrictive membership practices, the number of Facebook users would soon accelerate past the number of MySpace users. MySpace is still around, but the number of site visitors — not even active users — has dropped to mere millions. Despite that, early MySpace was better than every version of Facebook. For those who remember early MySpace, it was a learning tool, it helped us form our identities and it expanded the music landscape.”

Garbage Day: What Does A Platform Look Like When It’s Dying?

Garbage Day: What Does A Platform Look Like When It’s Dying?. “MySpace and 4chan launched in 2003 (within three months of each other, interestingly enough), then Digg launched in 2004, Reddit and YouTube in 2005, and Facebook in 2006. The first half of the 00s was, looking back at it, actually a nonstop flurry of online activity. But, things got a lot more interesting towards the end of the decade when MySpace was starting to die. And while putting a date on the actual death of a social network is difficult, for MySpace we do have a decent time range to approximate its demise. And I think comparing the site’s final years to where we are with Meta (Facebook) now is actually really fascinating.”

Nylon: An Oral History Of The Mid-2000s Scene Queens

Nylon: An Oral History Of The Mid-2000s Scene Queens. “Myspace was the creation of a mysterious man known simply as Tom, but by then, it was clear who really ruled the site. This was the era when the Scene Queens were at the top of the world — or, at least, at the top of your Top 8. They controlled the blogosphere with a heavy-hand of eyeliner and a searing hot flatiron, mingling offline with some of the era’s biggest bands, effectively making them the objects of obsession on LiveJournal and beyond. And then, just as quickly as Ryan Ross left Panic! at the Disco, they all but disappeared from the mainstream — or did they?”

ABC News Australia: Like MySpace before it, TikTok is putting music discovery back into fans’ hands

ABC News Australia: Like MySpace before it, TikTok is putting music discovery back into fans’ hands. “Platforms like YouTube, Instagram, and even Vine (R.I.P.) weren’t specifically built for the purpose of sharing and discovering music, but that element has always been wrapped up in the DNA of social media. So what makes TikTok different? It’s hardly the first app to allow users to wear their music like a badge of honour. But in terms of music discovery, it’s arguably the closest successor to the grandpa of social media: MySpace.”

TechCrunch: The Internet Archive has uploaded 450,000 songs collected before Myspace’s massive data loss

TechCrunch: The Internet Archive has uploaded 450,000 songs collected before Myspace’s massive data loss. “Called the MySpace Music Dragon Hoard, the collection contains 450,000 songs. While this is just a small percentage of the tracks reportedly lost (according to estimates, up to 53 million songs from 14 million artists were deleted), it contains early work from now-famous artists including Donald Glover and Katy Perry, as Twitter user @pinkpushpop discovered.”

New York Times: What Happens When Facebook Goes the Way of Myspace?

New York Times: What Happens When Facebook Goes the Way of Myspace?. “Facebook earned more than $5 billion in profit last quarter, and yet it has spent much of 2018 trapped in a defensive crouch. This year was defined by brutal press coverage, internal strife, executive departures and unwanted attention from authorities. The company stands accused of various offenses: degrading politics; empowering despots; leaving users vulnerable to abuse; abusing its users’ data for profit. It is in a constant state of crisis such that its executives’ responses to scandals end up becoming scandals themselves. But the single event most pertinent to Facebook’s future, and with the most explanatory power regarding its recent past, came in January, when the company admitted its flagship site had found a worrying limit.”

MySpace turns 15: Looking back at a pre-Facebook world (CNET)

CNET: MySpace turns 15: Looking back at a pre-Facebook world. “Fifteen years ago, on Aug. 1, 2003, a man named Tom Anderson launched one of the most popular social networking sites of its time. Known as MySpace, it went on to earn $800 million in revenue and generated 4.3 billion daily page views in 2008. Eventually, the site would be usurped by Facebook as the largest social networking platform, but from about 2005 to 2009, MySpace was the place to be on the internet.”

BuzzFeed: Myspace Looked Like It Was Back. Actually, It Was A Pawn In An Ad Fraud Scheme

BuzzFeed: Myspace Looked Like It Was Back. Actually, It Was A Pawn In An Ad Fraud Scheme. “Myspace — the iconic social network of the early 2000s — seemed to be experiencing a resurgence this summer when millions of visitors flocked to its new video page, potentially generating a wave of ad revenue for the site’s troubled parent company, Time Inc. But Myspace shut the page down this week after a BuzzFeed News investigation revealed that the surge in traffic came primarily from suspect sources that racked up fraudulent ad impressions. Myspace says it was completely unaware of and didn’t profit from any fraudulent traffic or impressions, and that the video page in question was hosted and managed by a partner and not by Myspace itself.”

The Next Web: It’s far, far too easy to break into old Myspace accounts

The Next Web: It’s far, far too easy to break into old Myspace accounts. “Myspace, perhaps conscious of the fact that many people have since lost access to the email accounts associated with their profiles, offers a tool that lets you recover them. You simply have to verify your identity by providing a few pieces of information. Unfortunately, according to information shared exclusively with TNW by security researcher Leigh-Anne Galloway, this process is deeply flawed, and makes it trivially easy for a bad actor to gain unauthorized access to any account.”

Gizmodo: Over 560 Million Passwords Discovered in Anonymous Online Database

Oh boy. Gizmodo: Over 560 Million Passwords Discovered in Anonymous Online Database. “Kromtech researcher Bob Diachenko told Gizmodo on Tuesday that the leaky database contains roughly 243.6 million unique email addresses, an overwhelming majority of which were compromised during previous (and since secured) data breaches at LinkedIn, DropBox, LastFM, MySpace, Adobe, Neopets, and Tumblr, among others.”

MySpace Apparently Hacked, Over 350 Million Passwords Stolen

Apparently some hackers were feeling retro: MySpace has apparently been hacked with over 350 million passwords stolen. “It’s unclear when the data was stolen from MySpace, but both the hacker, who’s known as Peace, and one of the operators of LeakedSource, a paid hacked data search engine that also claims to have the credentials, said it’s from a past, unreported, breach. Neither Peace nor LeakedSource provided a sample of the hacked data. But Motherboard gave LeakedSource the email addresses of three staffers and two friends who had an account on the site to verify that the data was real. In all five cases, LeakedSource was able to send back their password.”