National Archives: PIDB Submits Letter to President Biden Supporting Transparency in Public Release of JFK Assassination Records

National Archives: PIDB Submits Letter to President Biden Supporting Transparency in Public Release of JFK Assassination Records. “On September 27, 2021, the Public Interest Declassification Board (PIDB) submitted a letter to President Biden unanimously encouraging the maximum public release of records under the John F. Kennedy Assassination Records Collection Act (JFK Act). Passed in 1992, the JFK Act required all federal agencies and offices to identify, organize, and transfer copies of all records regarding the JFK assassination to the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA).”

National Archives: Civil War Maps from the Army Corps of Engineers Now Digitized

National Archives: Civil War Maps from the Army Corps of Engineers Now Digitized. “Civil War era and related maps from the Army Corps of Engineers have been digitized and are available to view and download from the National Archives Catalog. The records are part of the Civil Works Map File series from Record Group 77, Records of the Office of the Chief of Engineers. The records make up the Z file unit.”

National Archives: Celebrate Constitution Day with the National Archives (virtually)

National Archives: Celebrate Constitution Day with the National Archives (virtually). “The National Archives celebrates the 234th anniversary of the signing of the Constitution with a book talk, ‘The People’s Constitution: 200 Years, 27 Amendments, and the Promise of a More Perfect Union,’ a kids’ program with James Madison, and We Rule! – our new civics initiative! The National Archives is the permanent home of the original Constitution. Constitution Day celebrates the signing of this landmark document in Philadelphia on September 17, 1787. These programs are free, but advanced registration is encouraged. See Celebrating Constitution Day for an array of related online resources.”

NextGov: NARA Plans to Expand Access to Digital Records Over the Next 5 Years

NextGov: NARA Plans to Expand Access to Digital Records Over the Next 5 Years. “The National Archives and Records Administration released its draft 2022-2026 Strategic Plan with a heavy focus on maximizing the use and availability of digital records. By the end of this year, NARA will only be accepting electronic records from federal agencies. But that digital revolution will mean big changes for NARA, too, and the agency is working on a strategic plan to continue that evolution through 2026.”

National Archives: National Archives Releases Recommendations from Internal Task Force on Racism

National Archives: National Archives Releases Recommendations from Internal Task Force on Racism. “Last year, as our nation was confronting ongoing issues related to racial justice, Archivist of the United States David S. Ferriero established a task force of National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) employees to identify issues of racial inequality in both our customer-facing operations and internally within our workplaces, in pursuit of an equitable and inclusive environment for all employees and customers.”

GovExec: Trump, Defying Custom, Hasn’t Given the National Archives Records of His Speeches at Political Rallies

GovExec: Trump, Defying Custom, Hasn’t Given the National Archives Records of His Speeches at Political Rallies. “In the case of modern presidents, for the official record, we rely upon transcriptions of all their speeches collected by the national government. But in the case of Donald Trump, that historical record is likely to have a big gap. Almost 10% of the president’s total public speeches are excluded from the official record. And that means a false picture of the Trump presidency is being created in the official record for posterity.”

Roll Call: Veterans hit by huge pandemic-related records backlog

Roll Call: Veterans hit by huge pandemic-related records backlog. “Since the beginning of the pandemic, the [National Personnel Records Center] has sat empty, with employees working remotely. And records requests, most of which require someone to physically search for documents within the building, have been piling up. Now, the backlog has grown to more than 499,000 requests, according to a spokesperson for the National Archives, which oversees the NPRC. The National Archives estimates that it will take 18 to 24 months to clear the backlog once the center is staffed at full capacity.”

NARA: NARA Datasets on the AWS Registry of Open Data

NARA: NARA Datasets on the AWS Registry of Open Data. “The metadata index for the 1940 Census dataset is 251 megabytes, and all of the 3.7 million images from the population schedules, the enumeration district maps, and the enumeration district descriptions total over 15 terabytes. This dataset reflects the 1940 Census records that are also available on NARA’s 1940 Census website and in the National Archives Catalog.”

Citizens for Ethics: Judge stops ICE from destroying records of abuse

Citizens for Ethics: Judge stops ICE from destroying records of abuse. “ICE cannot destroy records of sexual abuse and assault, death reviews, detainee segregation files and other records it planned to dispose of, a federal judge ordered today in a case brought by Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, American Historical Association and the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations.”

New Photos: Buffalo Soldiers at West Point (National Archives News)

National Archives News: New Photos: Buffalo Soldiers at West Point. “Photographs of Buffalo Soldiers serving at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point, NY, during the early 20th century recently came to light at the National Archives. The images were discovered by a preservationist who was digitizing thousands of nitrate negatives transferred from the Academy to the Still Picture Branch of the National Archives at College Park, MD. Recognized for their expertise in riding, African American cavalry noncommissioned officers of the 9th and 10th Cavalry Regiments were stationed at West Point to serve in the Academy’s Detachment of Cavalry and teach Academy cadets military horsemanship.”

NARA: National Archives Launches Trump Presidential Library Website

NARA: National Archives Launches Trump Presidential Library Website. “The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) today launched the Donald J. Trump Presidential Library website, which provides information on archived White House websites and social media accounts, as well as information on access to the records of the Trump Administration. Under the Presidential Records Act, the National Archives receives all records of the Trump Administration, which will be preserved in NARA facilities in the Washington, DC, area, and access to those records will be provided through the Donald J. Trump Presidential Library, controlled and administered by the National Archives.”

The Guardian: Historians having to tape together records that Trump tore up

The Guardian: Historians having to tape together records that Trump tore up. “The public will not see Donald Trump’s White House records for years, but there is growing concern the collection will never be complete – leaving a hole in the history of one of America’s most tumultuous presidencies. Trump has been cavalier about the law requiring that records be preserved. He has a habit of ripping up documents before tossing them out, forcing White House workers to spend hours taping them back together.”

National Archives News: New Finding Aid Improves Search for Native American Photos

National Archives News: New Finding Aid Improves Search for Native American Photos. “It is now easier than ever to search through more than 18,000 digitized photos from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, thanks to a new finding aid from the National Archives and Records Administration. Released on November 19, 2020, the finding aid presents more than a century of archived photographs of Native American communities from the National Archives Catalog in a researcher-friendly format, searchable by Tribal Nation, topic, or state.”

National Archives: National Archives Launches Voting Rights Records Portal

National Archives: National Archives Launches Voting Rights Records Portal. “A new resource on Archives.gov highlights National Archives records related to voting rights and the African American vote. The portal, which launched last week, allows users to more easily access the documents that trace the country’s voting history, with a focus on several searchable sections: Laws and Court Cases, Organizations, People and Icons, Freedom Summer, and Selma Marches.”