New York Times: National Archives’ Emails Show Little Debate Over Altering Photo of Women’s March

New York Times: National Archives’ Emails Show Little Debate Over Altering Photo of Women’s March. “Historians and archivists said the agency had violated the public’s trust. March organizers called it an attempt to silence women. And on social media, some questioned whether Mr. Trump himself had ordered the alterations, recalling his fury over a photo of his inauguration crowds. But in dozens of emails released by the National Archives about the image, officials appeared more concerned about the costs of licensing the photo than the ethics of changing it.”

FedScoop: The National Archives is looking for some more cloud

FedScoop: The National Archives is looking for some more cloud . “The independent agency posted a request for information recently, soliciting feedback from companies on a potential plan to replace its enterprise cloud contract. The contract listing is called ‘Platform & Infrastructure for Cloud Archives & Records Depositories’ or, in acronym form, PICARD.”

Artnet: How the National Archives’ Notorious Alteration of a Women’s March Photo Is Part of a Long American Tradition

Artnet: How the National Archives’ Notorious Alteration of a Women’s March Photo Is Part of a Long American Tradition. “What distinguishes these past controversies from the Archives affair is that they involved hiding artifacts and information from public view or offering a new interpretation. The episode surrounding the Women’s March photo, on the other hand—one that is characteristic of the Trump era—involved actually altering an artifact being shown to visitors. The vigorous reaction from curators and historians shows that there is a clear consensus that this crossed a line.”

The National Archives Blog: Accepting Responsibility, Working to Rebuild Your Trust

The National Archives Blog: Accepting Responsibility, Working to Rebuild Your Trust. “Our credibility, so important to our mission, understandably has been questioned. We have begun to examine internal exhibit policies and processes and we will incorporate external best practices to ensure something like this never happens again. In addition to our public apology and my letter to staff yesterday, we will be apologizing to our colleagues in the archives, museum, library, education, and other fields, as well.”

New Yorker: The Erasure of Political History at the National Archives

New Yorker: The Erasure of Political History at the National Archives . “The chances of factual truth surviving the onslaught of power are very slim indeed; it is always in danger of being maneuvered out of the world not only for a time but, potentially, forever. Facts and events are infinitely more fragile things than axioms, discoveries, theories—even the most wildly speculative ones—produced by the human mind; they occur in the field of the ever-changing affairs of men, in whose flux there is nothing more permanent than the admittedly relative permanence of the human mind’s structure. Once they are lost, no rational effort will ever bring them back.”

Washington Post: National Archives exhibit blurs images critical of President Trump

Washington Post: National Archives exhibit blurs images critical of President Trump. “The Archives acknowledged in a statement this week that it made multiple alterations to the photo of the 2017 Women’s March showcased at the museum, blurring signs held by marchers that were critical of Trump. Words on signs that referenced women’s anatomy were also blurred. In the original version of the 2017 photograph, taken by Getty Images photographer Mario Tama, the street is packed with marchers carrying a variety of signs, with the Capitol in the background. In the Archives version, at least four of those signs are altered.” The National Archives has apologized for what it characterized as a “mistake.”

Maine: National Archives awards $96K to Maine State Archives to digitize legislative journals

Maine: National Archives awards $96K to Maine State Archives to digitize legislative journals. “The Maine State Archives recently received a grant from the National Archives’ National Historical Publications and Records Commission, which will fund the digitization of previously unpublished journals of the Maine Legislature.”