Smithsonian Magazine: How to Keep Up With NASA’s Perseverance Rover as It Explores Mars

Smithsonian Magazine: How to Keep Up With NASA’s Perseverance Rover as It Explores Mars. “Helping Perseverance complete its mission are several key science instruments. The Ingenuity Mars Helicopter marks the first attempt at a powered, controlled flight on another planet that hopes to give a birds-eye view of the rover’s mission, and the Mars Oxygen In-Situ Resource Utilization Experiment (MOXIE) aims to convert air from Mars’ carbon dioxide-heavy atmosphere into oxygen. For those who found the images, video and audio from the rover’s Mars expedition that came out this week, stay in touch with ‘Percy’ and its journey with our collection of experts to follow and resources to use.”

NASA: NASA’s Perseverance Rover Sends Sneak Peek of Mars Landing

NASA: NASA’s Perseverance Rover Sends Sneak Peek of Mars Landing. “Unlike with past rovers, the majority of Perseverance’s cameras capture images in color. After landing, two of the Hazard Cameras (Hazcams) captured views from the front and rear of the rover, showing one of its wheels in the Martian dirt. Perseverance got a close-up from NASA’s eye in the sky, as well: NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance. Orbiter, which used a special high-resolution camera to capture the spacecraft sailing into Jezero Crater, with its parachute trailing behind.”

NASA: Explore NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory With the New Virtual Tour

NASA: Explore NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory With the New Virtual Tour. “The interactive tour takes visitors to several locations at the 177-acre laboratory, which together provide an overview of JPL’s rich history and its many space missions, past and present. Each location is embedded with dozens of points of interest – including videos, fun facts, and images. For example, you can drop by the control room for the Deep Space Network, where JPL staff communicate with every NASA spacecraft flying beyond the orbit of the Moon.”

Google Blog: Celebrating 20 years of human life on the ISS with NASA

Google Blog: Celebrating 20 years of human life on the ISS with NASA. “Today we’re proud to announce on Google Arts & Culture a new online celebration of this week’s 20th anniversary of humans living and working on the International Space Station (ISS). Created in collaboration with NASA, this project includes NASA collections, stories, and some new games to help anybody learn more and engage in this important milestone in space exploration.”

NASA: AI Is Helping Scientists Discover Fresh Craters on Mars

NASA: AI Is Helping Scientists Discover Fresh Craters on Mars. “Sometime between March 2010 and May 2012, a meteor streaked across the Martian sky and broke into pieces, slamming into the planet’s surface. The resulting craters were relatively small – just 13 feet (4 meters) in diameter. The smaller the features, the more difficult they are to spot using Mars orbiters. But in this case – and for the first time – scientists spotted them with a little extra help: artificial intelligence (AI).”

Bloomberg: Estee Lauder Pays NASA $128,000 for Photo Shoot in Space

Bloomberg: Estee Lauder Pays NASA $128,000 for Photo Shoot in Space . “The U.S. cosmetics giant is spending $128,000 for NASA to fly 10 bottles of its skin serum to the International Space Station. Once there, astronauts will take pictures of Estee Lauder’s Advanced Night Repair in the cupola control tower, which has panoramic views of the cosmos. The images will be used on social media, with the company planning to auction one bottle off for charity when the items return to Earth this spring.”

NASA: NASA’s Chandra Opens Treasure Trove of Cosmic Delights

NASA: NASA’s Chandra Opens Treasure Trove of Cosmic Delights. “Humanity has “eyes” that can detect all different types of light through telescopes around the globe and a fleet of observatories in space. From radio waves to gamma rays, this ‘multiwavelength’ approach to astronomy is crucial to getting a complete understanding of objects in space. This compilation gives examples of images from different missions and telescopes being combined to better understand the science of the universe. Each of these images contains data from NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory as well as other telescopes. Various types of objects are shown (galaxies, supernova remnants, stars, planetary nebulas), but together they demonstrate the possibilities when data from across the electromagnetic spectrum are assembled.”

SlashGear: NASA’s new tool lets anyone watch Perseverance rover’s journey in real-time

SlashGear: NASA’s new tool lets anyone watch Perseverance rover’s journey in real-time. “Following its recent successful launch of the spacecraft, NASA’s Perseverance rover is on its way to Mars, a journey that will take several months. All will be quiet during this time, but that doesn’t mean you have to wait for more information. NASA has launched a free online tool that enables anyone to monitor the rover’s journey in real-time, read information about the journey, and see which celestial body the spacecraft is closest to at any given moment.”

NASA Earth Observatory: A New Tool for Tracking Amazon Fires

NASA Earth Observatory: A New Tool for Tracking Amazon Fires. “NASA-funded researchers have developed new tools that will make it easier for governments and other stakeholders to understand what types of fires are burning, where they are burning, and how much risk those fires pose to the rainforest. The satellite-driven, web-based tool quickly classifies fires into one of four categories—deforestation, understory fires, small clearing and agricultural fires, and savanna/grassland fires. The tool was made available on the web on August 19, 2020.”

Emulsive: One Giant Leap… Remastering High-resolution Images Of NASA’s Race To The Moon

Emulsive: One Giant Leap… Remastering High-resolution Images Of NASA’s Race To The Moon. “Historically, most of the photographs presented in the media have been based on decades-old, low-resolution scans/digitisation. This has been remedied somewhat by efforts to create high-resolution scans of the negatives, although many of the ~35,000 frames from NASA’s Apollo archive at the Johnson Space Center still need work to bring out the detail we all know is stored in those amazing Kodak negatives and slides. This is where Andy Saunders comes in. Over the past few years, Andy has worked tirelessly to remaster both high- and low-resolution scans from NASA’s archive, bringing many 16mm, 35mm and 70mm slides and negatives from the Apollo missions into sharp relief for the first time.” The article called Mr. Saunders’ work “astounding” and that ain’t the half of it.