Computerworld Australia: Google, NASA, UTS propose ‘hello world’ test for quantum computers

Computerworld Australia: Google, NASA, UTS propose ‘hello world’ test for quantum computers. “What is the smallest computational task a quantum computer might be able to complete, that the most powerful supercomputers available today would find prohibitively hard? Find that and you locate the frontier of what is commonly (and some say, problematically) referred to as ‘quantum supremacy’.”

The Register: NASA dusts off FORTRAN manual, revives 20-year-old data on Ganymede

The Register: NASA dusts off FORTRAN manual, revives 20-year-old data on Ganymede. “NASA scientists have made some new discoveries about Jupiter’s giant moon Ganymede, thanks to a dedicated team, an elderly VAX machine and 20-year-old data from the long-defunct Galileo probe. Fifteen years after Galileo (no, not that one) ended its days with a plunge into the atmosphere of Jupiter, NASA scientists have resurrected the 20-year-old datasets and added more detail to the puzzle of Ganymede’s magnetosphere.”

NASA: Help NASA Create the Largest Landslide Database

NASA: Help NASA Create the Largest Landslide Database. “Landslides cause thousands of deaths and billions of dollars in property damage each year. Surprisingly, very few centralized global landslide databases exist, especially those that are publicly available. Now NASA scientists are working to fill the gap—and they want your help collecting information. In March 2018, NASA scientist Dalia Kirschbaum and several colleagues launched a citizen science project that will make it possible to report landslides you have witnessed, heard about in the news, or found on an online database. All you need to do is log into the Landslide Reporter portal and report the time, location, and date of the landslide—as well as your source of information.”

Calling All Cloud Gazers: NASA Needs Your Help! (NASA)

NASA: Calling All Cloud Gazers: NASA Needs Your Help!. “It’s almost spring, the time of year when the looming change in seasons could lead to some pretty fascinating cloud activity in the sky. NASA and the GLOBE Program are asking for your help by taking part in a citizen science cloud observation challenge. From March 15 through April 15, citizen scientists of all ages can make up to 10 cloud observations per day using the GLOBE Observer app or one of the other data entry options (for trained GLOBE members). Challenge participants with the most observations will be congratulated by a NASA scientist in a video posted on the GLOBE Program’s website and on social media.”

Ars Technica: Facebook sends Ars takedown notice from Pink Floyd over NASA audio

Ars Technica: Facebook sends Ars takedown notice from Pink Floyd over NASA audio. “On Wednesday, Ars received an official notice via our Facebook page that one of our videos was in apparent violation of Pink Floyd’s copyright. According to the takedown notice, just a six-second portion of our video was infringing. When we clicked the link to see, it turned out that Pink Floyd was upset about six seconds of audio that we had taken from an official NASA recording that we pulled from the Internet Archive.” Thanks to this story, ResearchBuzz Firehose now has an “Oh for crying out loud” tag.

TechCrunch: Google AI helped find the first solar system outside our own with 8 planets

TechCrunch: Google AI helped find the first solar system outside our own with 8 planets. “Google and NASA today announced the discovery of a new planet in solar system Kepler 90, achieved using machine learning. By applying neural networking to Kepler data, scientists have found, for the first time, an eighth planet in the Kepler-90 system – this ties the Kepler-90 system with our own system for the most planets in any known system.”

The University of Texas at Dallas: Researchers Launch Moon Mission Audio Site

The University of Texas at Dallas: Researchers Launch Moon Mission Audio Site. “NASA recorded thousands of hours of audio from the Apollo lunar missions, yet most of us have only been able to hear the highlights. The agency recorded all communications between the astronauts, mission control specialists and back-room support staff during the historic moon missions in addition to Neil Armstrong’s famous quotes from Apollo 11 in July 1969. Most of the audio remained in storage on outdated analog tapes for decades until researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas launched a project to analyze the audio and make it accessible to the public.” Visit the site, yes, but also read the article. The team innovated a lot to get this done.