NASA: NASA Invites Public to Submit Names to Fly Aboard Next Mars Rover

NASA: NASA Invites Public to Submit Names to Fly Aboard Next Mars Rover. “Although it will be years before the first humans set foot on Mars, NASA is giving the public an opportunity to send their names — stenciled on chips — to the Red Planet with NASA’s Mars 2020 rover, which represents the initial leg of humanity’s first round trip to another planet. The rover is scheduled to launch as early as July 2020, with the spacecraft expected to touch down on Mars in February 2021.”

Universities Space Research Association: The LPI’s Lunar South Pole Atlas — A New Online Reference for Mission Planners

Universities Space Research Association: The LPI’s Lunar South Pole Atlas — A New Online Reference for Mission Planners. “The Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI), managed by Universities Space Research Association (USRA), has compiled and made available an atlas of the Moon’s south pole… Given NASA’s recent direction to implement Space Policy Directive-1 landing astronauts at the south pole by 2024, the LPI has compiled a series of maps, images, and illustrations designed to provide context and reference for those interested in exploring this area.”

The Verge: How to watch space launches as they happen

The Verge: How to watch space launches as they happen. “Most of us aren’t aware of how many launches take place each year. Besides flights to and from the International Space Station (ISS), there are satellites being sent into orbit, exploratory craft, and new technologies being tested. And because current technologies allow us to view the process to a greater extent than ever before (with more actual footage and less reliance on animation), it is even more interesting to watch than it was a generation ago.”

The Verge: NASA would like you to record memories of the first Moon landing

The Verge: NASA would like you to record memories of the first Moon landing. “If you remember where you were when astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped onto the Moon’s surface for the first time — or you know someone whose memory stretches back to the summer of ‘69 — NASA needs your help.”

The Verge: Why NASA wants you to point your smartphone at trees

The Verge: Why NASA wants you to point your smartphone at trees. “NASA would like you to take a picture of a tree, please. The space agency’s ICESat-2 satellite estimates the height of trees from space, and NASA has created a new tool for citizen scientists that can help check those measurements from the ground. All it takes is a smartphone, the app, an optional tape measure, and a tree.”

Digital Trove of Apollo Artifacts Debuts on Draper’s New Website: Hack the Moon (PRWeb) (PRESS RELEASE)

PRWeb: Digital Trove of Apollo Artifacts Debuts on Draper’s New Website: Hack the Moon (PRESS RELEASE). “Hack the Moon is free and open to the public. Visitors to the site… will find more than 2,000 images, 200 pieces of original content and 150 videos that tell the story of the Apollo missions. The site features a handy search engine, a mobile-friendly design and special sections on the people, the technology and the missions.”

First all-female spacewalk: How to watch NASA make history (CNET)

CNET: First all-female spacewalk: How to watch NASA make history. “It’s been 35 years since cosmonaut Svetlana Savitskaya became the first woman to walk in space when she stepped outside the Salyut 7 space station. On Friday, NASA astronauts Anne McClain and Christina Koch are scheduled to take a spacewalk outside the International Space Station. If all goes as planned, they will become the first all-female spacewalk team in history.”