ABC News (Australia): National Archives of Australia warns historial recordings, films and images could soon be lost

ABC News (Australia): National Archives of Australia warns historial recordings, films and images could soon be lost . “While the National Archives has long warned that its collection was at risk, it’s the first time it has detailed specific items that could disappear, including recordings from the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, ASIO surveillance footage and original films of early Australian Antarctic research expeditions.”

The Guardian: Australian archives agency is allowing ‘national treasures’ to deteriorate, internal review finds

The Guardian: Australian archives agency is allowing ‘national treasures’ to deteriorate, internal review finds. “The funding-starved National Archives of Australia is allowing documents to deteriorate, potentially against its legal obligations, and is struggling to meet its mandate to preserve government records and make them public, a damning review has found.”

Canberra Times (Australia): National Archives signs $4.4m contract to digitise World War II service records

Canberra Times (Australia): National Archives signs $4.4m contract to digitise World War II service records. “The National Archives of Australia said on Tuesday it had signed contracts worth $4.4 million to digitise more than 650,000 service records. Among the records to be saved, and which will be available for free online, are photographs of servicemen and women which were previously at-risk of deterioration.”

Sydney Morning Herald: Archives’ legal bill for Palace Papers case could top $2 million

Sydney Morning Herald: Archives’ legal bill for Palace Papers case could top $2 million. “The National Archives spent $1 million fighting to stop Australians seeing the Palace Papers and faces spending that amount again on the legal costs of the historian who battled to get the documents released. Meanwhile, thousands of secret foreign policy files gather dust in public service store rooms waiting for declassification as the archives complains of funding shortfalls.” I only vaguely knew of the Palace Papers. ABC News Australia filled me in.

‘There’s no way we can save it all’: National Archives says audio-visual records will be lost (Young Witness)

The Young Witness (Australia): ‘There’s no way we can save it all’: National Archives says audio-visual records will be lost. “The National Archives of Australia is preparing to lose large sections of its 117,000 hours of magnetic tape archives, including a prioritisation process to ensure archives relating to Indigenous languages and culture aren’t lost. Archivists across the world agree that audio visual archives held on magnetic tape will be lost forever if they are not digitised by 2025, a deadline that institutions like the National Archives and National Film and Sound Archive are battling to meet.”

The Guardian: National archives’ 90-day delay to declassify palace letters ‘extremely disappointing’

The Guardian: National archives’ 90-day delay to declassify palace letters ‘extremely disappointing’. “The historian Jenny Hocking says she is ‘extremely disappointed’ that the National Archives of Australia has asserted it has 90 business days to declassify the palace letters prior to release, saying it may misunderstand the orders of the high court. The archives on Tuesday issued a statement saying it was working to prepare the letters – correspondence between the Queen, her private secretary, and the governor general, John Kerr, in the lead up to the former prime minister Gough Whitlam’s 1975 dismissal – for release following a momentous high court ruling last week.”

Anne Twomey: National Archives ‘completely dysfunctional’ for serious scholarship (The Mandarin)

The Mandarin: Anne Twomey: National Archives ‘completely dysfunctional’ for serious scholarship. “Constitutional law professor Anne Twomey thinks the National Archives is nearly useless for serious academic and historical research, partly because it is ‘starved of funding’ and takes too long to decide whether to open old government records.”

The Canberra Times: National Archives review begins as agency races to save ‘at risk’ records

The Canberra Times: National Archives review begins as agency races to save ‘at risk’ records. “Nearly 200,000 hours of recordings containing Australia’s memory are at risk under a looming six-year deadline to save the National Archives’ vulnerable files, its director-general says. David Fricker issued the warning about the nation’s ageing historical recordings after the federal government started an independent review of the agency’s needs.”

Sydney Morning Herald: National Archives wants more money and a new building

Sydney Morning Herald: National Archives wants more money and a new building. “There’s a lot to keep you awake at night when you’re the director of a national institution. For National Archives of Australia director David Fricker, it’s the thought of what parts of Australia’s story might be lost if funding for collecting institutions continues to be cut. The national collection of government records includes hundreds of thousands of audio-visual items, most of which will become inaccessible within the next 10 years, if not sooner, Mr Fricker says.”

Sydney Morning Herald: Archives confirms 10 jobs to go, admits to ‘decline’ in access to records

Sydney Morning Herald: National Archives confirms 10 jobs to go, admits to ‘decline’ in access to records. “A ‘downsizing’ at the National Archives of Australia has left it less able to give access to records, its boss David Fricker says. The agency that describes itself as Australia’s memory will lose another 10 staff this year after staffing cuts in 2017-18, he confirmed at a Senate estimates hearing on Wednesday. It comes as the archives faces more applications from researchers to access records.”