Trove in trouble: why does it cost money to keep the resource online? (Cosmos)

Cosmos: Trove in trouble: why does it cost money to keep the resource online?. “The online database Trove may go offline in the middle of the year without additional funding. Trove, which is owned and operated by the National Library of Australia (NLA), is a free resource which provides access to billions of digital documents, images, media and records of physical documents. It also contains millions of digitised Australian newspaper pages and issues.”

ABC News (Australia): Canberra galleries, museums call for urgent budget aid to undo decade of ‘utter neglect’

ABC News (Australia): Canberra galleries, museums call for urgent budget aid to undo decade of ‘utter neglect’. “Canberra’s top museums and galleries say they cannot afford to fix their ageing buildings and are pleading for financial aid in next month’s federal budget. A lobby group representing the cultural institutions said about $800 million was needed to repair the facilities, which include places like the National Gallery of Australia (NGA) and the National Library of Australia (NLA).”

Government of Australia: Preserving Australia’s at-risk collections with $47 million

Government of Australia: Preserving Australia’s at-risk collections with $47 million. “The Morrison Government is investing more than $47 million to digitise and preserve collection material held by the National Film and Sound Archive (NFSA), and seven other National Collecting Institutions, and to maintain the National Library of Australia’s (NLA) Trove website. The NFSA will receive $41.9 million over four years to fund a major program to digitise and store at-risk audio-visual collection material held across the eight National Collecting Institutions.”

Brisbane Times (Australia): Donations pour in to Archives as historians decry decay of ‘national memory bank’

Brisbane Times (Australia): Donations pour in to Archives as historians decry decay of ‘national memory bank’. “The National Archives has raised almost $100,000 in donations in a bid to save its most at-risk records as some of the nation’s pre-eminent historians argue it should never have been forced into a public appeal for funding. In the four weeks since the Archives launched a membership program, which asks $40 a person or $60 a household, the number of people backing it has swelled seven-fold to more than 700.”

‘Inconceivable’: why has Australia’s history been left to rot? (The Guardian)

The Guardian: ‘Inconceivable’: why has Australia’s history been left to rot? . “Last week, it was revealed the archives had resorted to launching a crowdfunding site in a last ditch attempt to raise tens of millions of dollars to digitise disintegrating historical materials. The crowdfunding push has outraged Australia’s archivists and historians, and raised questions about the value Australia places on its national history.”

ABC News Australia: National Library finds 120-year-old chocolates commissioned by Queen Victoria and owned by Banjo Paterson

ABC News Australia: National Library finds 120-year-old chocolates commissioned by Queen Victoria and owned by Banjo Paterson. “Conservators at the National Library of Australia have unearthed one of the world’s oldest boxes of chocolates, dating back 120 years to the time of the Boer War. The souvenir chocolate tin was discovered at the bottom of a box of personal papers from the estate of Australian bush poet Andrew Barton ‘Banjo’ Paterson. Remarkably, the chocolates were not only unmolested after more than a century, but still looked — almost — good enough to eat.”

Jewish Press: 180 Years of Australian Jewish Newspaper History Going Online

Jewish Press: 180 Years of Australian Jewish Newspaper History Going Online. “A new initiative will digitize and open free digital access to 180 years of Australian Jewish newspapers, including over 200,000 pages from Jewish communities across the continent. The project is a collaboration between the National Library of Australia (NLA), the National Library of Israel (NLI), and the Australian Jewish Historical Society (AJHS).”

Canberra Times: The National Library of Australia has a fascinating collection of performing arts scrapbooks now available to view online

Canberra Times: The National Library of Australia has a fascinating collection of performing arts scrapbooks now available to view online. “Eighteen scrapbooks of our theatrical past contain insights into performances by Dame Nellie Melba, concerts by the Essendon Musical Society and the acts of circus and vaudeville performers. They were compiled by a number of dedicated and, sometimes, unknown fans across the late 18th to the mid to late 20th centuries. The scrapbooks contain images, programs, advertisements, tickets, reviews and news clippings of and for a great number of theatre, vaudeville, ballet and opera performances.”

National Library of Australia: Australian Libraries Join Forces to Build National Digital Collection

National Library of Australia: Australian Libraries Join Forces to Build National Digital Collection. “Australia’s national, state and territory libraries have come together in a world-first collaboration to build a national digital collection, with the new national edeposit service (NED) launching this week. For more than 100 years, publishers have been legally required to deposit published works in Australian libraries. With the creation of NED, Australian libraries now have the digital infrastructure to preserve Australia’s documentary heritage for future generations, in the same way they always have for print.”

National Library of Australia: Australian Joint Copying Project Reimagined

National Library of Australia: Australian Joint Copying Project Reimagined. “The microfilm produced by the Australian Joint Copying Project has long been a first stop for those researching local or family history. The 10,400 microfilm reels however have been difficult to access even for those living near libraries holding the microfilm let alone those in rural areas. The content itself can often be dense and difficult to locate relevant information. The National Library of Australia has begun a new project to address these problems. Thanks to the Australian Public Service Modernisation Fund the AJCP Online Project will digitise the 7.5 million records captured on the original AJCP microfilm, delivering them online free of charge to all.”

Computerworld: National Library launches ‘enormous’ archive of Australia’s Internet

Computerworld: National Library launches ‘enormous’ archive of Australia’s Internet. “‘The Australian Web Archive [AWA] is one of the biggest in the world. And when we say big, we mean enormous,’ says director general of the National Library of Australia, Dr Marie-Louise Ayres. The new archive, which launched last week, contains around 600 terabytes of data across 9 billion records. In bookshelf terms; if the records were printed and stacked they would stretch from Canberra to Cairns.”

OpenGov: How the National Library of Australia is preparing for the digital age

OpenGov: How the National Library of Australia is preparing for the digital age. “OpenGov caught up with David Wong, Assistant Director-General of Information Technology and CIO at the National Library of Australia, to learn about the final stages of the program to replace the digital library infrastructure, and how the Library is building on the foundations laid by the program.”

Why We Collect What We Collect: Both A National And Personal Issue (National Library of Australia)

National Library of Australia: Why We Collect What We Collect: Both A National And Personal Issue . ” During this unprecedented postal survey Australians were asked their opinion on something affecting their family, friends, work colleagues, congregations and broader communities. For some of us, it’s even more fundamental. And although the shared collecting effort hasn’t resulted in as large a collection as we were expecting, this personal aspect and the growth of social media has resulted in this being one of our most successful collecting projects in terms of public support and engagement. For example, one of our Twitter posts requesting original copies of campaign material reached over half a million people.”