National Institutes of Health: The National Library of Medicine expands access to coronavirus literature through PubMed Central

National Institutes of Health: The National Library of Medicine expands access to coronavirus literature through PubMed Central. “Following on a statement issued by the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) and science policy leaders from almost a dozen other nations, [National Library of Medicine] has stepped up its collaboration with publishers and scholarly societies to increase the number of coronavirus-related journal articles in PMC, along with available data supporting them. Submitted publications will be made available in PMC as quickly as possible after publication, in formats and with needed permissions to support text mining.”

National Library of Medicine: Enhancing Data Sharing, One Dataset at a Time

National Library of Medicine: Enhancing Data Sharing, One Dataset at a Time. “The National Institutes of Health (NIH) has an ambitious vision for a modernized, integrated biomedical data ecosystem. How we plan to achieve this vision is outlined in the NIH Strategic Plan for Data Science, and the long-term goal is to have NIH-funded data be findable, accessible, interoperable, and reusable (FAIR). To support this goal, we have made enhancing data access and sharing a central theme throughout the strategic plan.”

Meet the PubMed Central Team: Perfectionists with a Sense of Humor (NLM In Focus)

NLM In Focus: Meet the PubMed Central Team: Perfectionists with a Sense of Humor. “Data constantly comes in from publishers and vendors that need to be processed by the PubMed Central (PMC) team. These data add up quickly, adding more than 40,000 articles each month to NLM’s full-text digital archive of journal literature. In order for the article data to be publicly accessible as quickly as possible, the PMC team needs to work with precision and perfection.”

Improving Info on Women’s Health: National Network of Medical Librarians Wants Your Help (National Library of Medicine)

National Library of Medicine: Improving Info on Women’s Health: National Network of Medical Librarians Wants Your Help. “Your research skills can help make Wikipedia a better, evidence-based resource for people looking for information on women’s health. Join the National Network of Libraries of Medicine on November 7 as medical librarians add citations to existing Wikipedia articles on women’s health using trusted National Library of Medicine resources like Genetics Home Reference, MedlinePlus, and PubMed.”

National Library of Medicine: Ephemera In The Dr. Leonidas H. Berry Collection

National Library of Medicine: Ephemera In The Dr. Leonidas H. Berry Collection. “The National Library of Medicine announces new public access to more than 1,600 letters, photographs, and other materials selected and digitized from the Leonidas H. Berry Papers, 1907–1982 manuscript collection, documenting the career and personal life of the trailblazing physician and civil rights advocate. His work is recognized in the NLM traveling banner exhibition For All the People: A Century in Citizen Action in Health Care Reform; the online adaptation of the exhibition features 1,686 digitized items in a digital gallery. “

National Library of Medicine: Visualize NLM’s Household Products Database!

National Library of Medicine: Visualize NLM’s Household Products Database!. “The National Library of Medicine Household Products Database (HPD) provides access to manufacturer developed Safety Data Sheets/SDS (formerly called Material Safety Data Sheets/MSDS) which describe the chemical properties of each product, physical data, health effects, first aid, reactivity, storage, handling, disposal, personal protection, and spill/leak procedures. As required by OSHA, information within each SDS is targeted to help those exposed to chemicals at work. Consumers may also find information that can help them safely use a product. Now you can visually explore the number and types of products in HPD. ”

National Library of Medicine: “Facts And Inferences”—Digitizing Shadows From The Walls Of Death Part 1

National Library of Medicine: “Facts And Inferences”—Digitizing Shadows From The Walls Of Death Part 1. “NLM has digitized and made publicly available for the first time, one of four known copies of Shadows from the Walls of Death: Facts and Inferences Prefacing a Book of Specimens of Arsenical Wall Papers, 1874. In this three-part series learn more about the origins of this rare book, the digitization effort, and the arsenic pigments of the 19th century.”

NLM In Focus: NLM Community Mapping—Creating & Supporting Citizen Scientists, Communities

NLM In Focus: NLM Community Mapping—Creating & Supporting Citizen Scientists, Communities. “What if there were a low-cost way for the public to provide accurate scientific data about what’s happening in their community regarding environmental health challenges? There is, and NLM is helping to lead the way in this growing field. ‘Through the Community Health Maps initiative, our goal is to help communities collect and visualize information to support planning and decision making,’ said Colette Hochstein, DMD, MLS, of NLM’s Specialized Information Services.”

Ill-Conceived, Well Drawn-and Powerful: Graphic Medicine Exhibition Debuts at NLM (NLM In Focus)

NLM in Focus: Ill-Conceived, Well Drawn-and Powerful: Graphic Medicine Exhibition Debuts at NLM. “Dozens of images are now online in Graphic Medicine: Ill-Conceived and Well-Drawn!, a multi-formatted exhibition which explores this increasingly popular genre and showcases the National Library of Medicine’s growing collection of graphic medicine works. Curated by Seattle cartoonist and educator Ellen Forney, author of the New York Times bestselling graphic novel Marbles: Mania, Depression, Michelangelo, and Me, the new exhibition introduces the genre, discussing who creates graphic medicine, how it conveys meaning, and its impact on readers and creators.”

National Library of Medicine: Want to do more with PubMed?

National Library of Medicine: Want to do more with PubMed?. “Want to extract just the PubMed data you need, in the format you want? Dreaming of creating your own PubMed tool or interface, but don’t know where to start? Check out the NLM Webinar ‘Insider’s Guide to Accessing NLM Data—Welcome to E-utilities for PubMed’ on February 13, 2018.”

Digitizing Material Culture: Handwritten Recipe Books, 1600-1900 (National Library of Medicine)

National Library of Medicine: Digitizing Material Culture: Handwritten Recipe Books, 1600-1900. “Cookery, alchemy, and medicine were closely intertwined in pre-modern Europe up to the 1800s. Recipes and advice for food preparation and preservation, animal husbandry, preparing useful household concoctions, and allopathic medicines and treatments for maintaining personal health were available in books via a growing publication industry and shared between friends, family, and neighbors. The head of a household would often record these in ‘receipt’ books, of which the Archives and Modern Manuscripts Collection holds a good number and has recently embarked on a project to digitize and make available in NLM Digital Collections.”

NLM Blog: We’re Witnessing a Health Data Explosion

From the National Library of Medicine blog: We’re Witnessing a Health Data Explosion. “From a public health perspective, I am interested in how NLM can foster new approaches to interpreting and using information so individuals can have more productive health care interactions and improved health decision-making. Along that bench-to-bedside continuum, I’m focused on the end, on what happens bedside, in the doctor’s office, or at the kitchen table as patients decide what to do.”

NLM Director Has a New Blog

The Director of the National Library of Medicine has a new blog. “I hope you’ll join me for these fascinating times, and that you’ll consider this blog the perfect space for some two-way dialogue. Along the way, as I acquire new information about NLM programs, services, people, and places, I promise to share them all with you. (Remind me to tell you about the time I actually got locked inside the Library, after official hours. I’m sure that’s a metaphor for something.)” She’s on Twitter, too, if you’d rather follow her that way.

National Library of Medicine Launches New Learning Resources Database

The National Library of Medicine has launched a new Learning Resources Database. “These materials include videos, tutorials, and handouts on products such as PubMed, ClinicalTrials.gov, Unified Medical Language System, and many more. Now you can find resources using one interface rather than searching different areas of the NLM Web site. An API is also available to auto-populate NLM learning resources on your Web site. The database currently holds all of the resources previously listed on the former Distance Education Resources Web page. “