National Library of New Zealand: Living history while documenting it

National Library of New Zealand: Living history while documenting it . “…after the 2011 Christchurch earthquake the teams within the Library, being mostly based in Wellington, were able to come together quickly to start documenting the impact of this earthquake on the city of Christchurch, and its communities. More recently, we have found ourselves documenting events while also personally experiencing them, the COVID-19 pandemic being one such example. Another example is the recent 2022 Wellington protests, where we found our building to be within the cordoned-off protest area and witnessed standoffs between police and protestors on our front steps.”

‘Help us’: The National Library’s unsolvable dilemma (Stuff New Zealand)

Stuff New Zealand: ‘Help us’: The National Library’s unsolvable dilemma. “Rachel Esson has run out of ideas. ‘We’ve tried book fairs. We’ve tried donating.’ After plans to ship 600,000 rarely-used books overseas were halted after months of pushback from the book sector, the National Librarian has a plea to save the books from the pulping machine: ‘We really don’t want to recycle them… help us.’ Esson will not waver​ on her view that the books from the Overseas Published Collection will be officially removed from the library – she just doesn’t know what to do with them after that.”

Stuff New Zealand: Documenting the pandemic – how Archives NZ and the National Library are keeping tabs

Stuff New Zealand: Documenting the pandemic – how Archives NZ and the National Library are keeping tabs. “For millennia humans have documented their time in unusual and humorous ways that people before or after didn’t understand. During the 1918 Spanish Flu pandemic, people shared cartoons and jokes making light of a terrible situation, many of which don’t make any sense today. Things are no different in the 21st century, but now technology is revolutionising the way we communicate.”

Stuff New Zealand: International concern about Internet Archive-National Library deal

Stuff New Zealand: International concern about Internet Archive-National Library deal. “An international group of authors including Sir Philip Pullman are concerned about the National Library’s partnership with the Internet Archive. ‘To find that a great national library like that of New Zealand is collaborating in a scheme to break the cherished copyright laws and give our work away for nothing is profoundly shocking,’ said Pullman, the president of the United Kingdom Society of Authors, in a recent letter sent to the library.”

Stuff (New Zealand): National Library signs ‘historic’ agreement to donate 600,000 books to online archive

Stuff (New Zealand): National Library signs ‘historic’ agreement to donate 600,000 books to online archive. “The National Library will donate 600,000 books that it was planning to cull from its overseas collection to a United States-based internet archive that will make digital copies of the works freely available online. National Librarian Rachel Esson announced the ‘historic’ agreement on Monday, saying books left at the end of the library’s review process would be donated to the Internet Archive, a digital library with the self-stated mission of universal access to all knowledge.”

National Library of New Zealand: Papers Past data has been set free

National Library of New Zealand: Papers Past data has been set free . “Papers Past is the National Library’s fully text searchable website containing over 150 newspapers from New Zealand and the Pacific, as well as magazines, journals and government reports. As a result of the data being released, people can now access the data from 78 New Zealand newspapers from the Albertland Gazette to the Victoria Times, all published before 1900. The data itself consists of the METS/ALTO XML files for each issue. The XML files sit in the back of Papers Past and are what allows you to locate keywords within articles.”

National Library of New Zealand: Introducing the Library Loudhailer

National Library of New Zealand: Introducing the Library Loudhailer . “The first podcast off the rank will be a conversation with Paul Diamond, one of the curators of the Pūkana exhibition (Te Ihi, Te Wehi, Te Wana – Moments in Māori performance) currently on show at the National Library in Wellington until the 30th of July 2020. We talk about developing the exhibition, what Paul learnt about the exhibition process and the joy of working in a team. Among Paul’s whirlwind description of the exhibition, he elaborates on the intricacies and purpose of the traditional Māori carved karetao (wooden puppets), delves into the power of haka, looks at the photography of Māori school pupils by Ans Westra, and grapples with the explosion that is the te reo singing heavy metal band Alien Weaponry.”

National Library of New Zealand: Six million pages and counting

National Library of New Zealand: Six million pages and counting. “As of today, Papers Past now holds more than 6 million pages of newspapers! We’ve reached this important milestone thanks to the addition of four completely new titles and some additional, early issues of the Wanganui Chronicle (its coverage now extends all the way back to 1860). The other four titles are the Gisborne Times (1901-1937), Hokitika Guardian (1917-1940), Opotiki News (1938-1950) and the Saturday Advertiser (July 1875-1878).”

National Library of New Zealand: Catching and describing the passing breeze

National Library of New Zealand: Catching and describing the passing breeze. “Ephemera, ‘relating to the day’, published to be of transitory use and then thrown away — such material creates a challenge for the librarian or archivist. How to collect and preserve Ephemera for future researchers? Thankfully, the Library is rising to the challenge, now not only in analogue formats but in the digital environment.”

National Library of New Zealand: Mrs Grimke’s scripture cards

National Library of New Zealand: Mrs Grimke’s scripture cards. “Last year the Library began looking into the possibilities of digitising all the publications listed in the Books in Māori bibliography. After the helpful feedback we got from the people who attended last year’s hui and some further research into the collection, we’ve decided to begin this project with two strands of work. Firstly we will digitise Te Kāhiti o Niu Tireni up to 1900, which is one of the serials listed in ‘Books in Māori’ (BIM). Te Kāhiti was the te reo version of the New Zealand Gazette, which primarily focused on applications and decisions made by the Native Land Court (later known as the Māori Land Court).”

National Library of New Zealand: Is your Facebook account an archive of the future?

National Library of New Zealand: Is your Facebook account an archive of the future?. “Over the next few months, we’re inviting New Zealanders to donate their Facebook archives to the Alexander Turnbull Library. In collecting personal Facebook archives of New Zealanders here and abroad, we will be continuing the work that has always been part of our mission: documenting the lives of New Zealanders today to support the emerging and anticipated research needs of the future.”

National Library of New Zealand: Black sheep in the family?

National Library of New Zealand: Black sheep in the family?. “What do Agnes Vallance, Agnes Skervington, Amy Laing, Amy Bennett, Amy Cameron, Amy Shannon, Amy Chanel, and Percy Redwood all have in common? Well, they are all aliases used by confidence trickster and male impersonator Amy Bock as she romped her way through New Zealand, defrauding her employees and, most notoriously, marrying a young woman in South Otago. You can now trace Amy’s career in and out of prison by searching the New Zealand Police Gazette (1877-1945). We have just made this title, along with the Canterbury Police Gazette (1863-1877) and the Otago Police Gazette (1861-1877) available and fully text searchable on Papers Past.”

National Library of New Zealand: Looking for Old Friends?

National Library of New Zealand: Looking for Old Friends?. “Old Friends (www.oldfriends.co.nz) was a popular social networking website owned by Trade Me. Its purpose was to help people locate former school friends and workmates. Members who signed up to Old Friends could upload photos, post comments, contact each other and compile information for reunions. The site was launched in 2002 and finally closed in 2016. When Trade Me announced that they would be taking the site down, the National Library quickly got in touch to see if we could work together to harvest a copy of Old Friends for the Library’s collections.”