National Library of New Zealand: Papers Past data has been set free

National Library of New Zealand: Papers Past data has been set free . “Papers Past is the National Library’s fully text searchable website containing over 150 newspapers from New Zealand and the Pacific, as well as magazines, journals and government reports. As a result of the data being released, people can now access the data from 78 New Zealand newspapers from the Albertland Gazette to the Victoria Times, all published before 1900. The data itself consists of the METS/ALTO XML files for each issue. The XML files sit in the back of Papers Past and are what allows you to locate keywords within articles.”

National Library of New Zealand: Introducing the Library Loudhailer

National Library of New Zealand: Introducing the Library Loudhailer . “The first podcast off the rank will be a conversation with Paul Diamond, one of the curators of the Pūkana exhibition (Te Ihi, Te Wehi, Te Wana – Moments in Māori performance) currently on show at the National Library in Wellington until the 30th of July 2020. We talk about developing the exhibition, what Paul learnt about the exhibition process and the joy of working in a team. Among Paul’s whirlwind description of the exhibition, he elaborates on the intricacies and purpose of the traditional Māori carved karetao (wooden puppets), delves into the power of haka, looks at the photography of Māori school pupils by Ans Westra, and grapples with the explosion that is the te reo singing heavy metal band Alien Weaponry.”

National Library of New Zealand: Six million pages and counting

National Library of New Zealand: Six million pages and counting. “As of today, Papers Past now holds more than 6 million pages of newspapers! We’ve reached this important milestone thanks to the addition of four completely new titles and some additional, early issues of the Wanganui Chronicle (its coverage now extends all the way back to 1860). The other four titles are the Gisborne Times (1901-1937), Hokitika Guardian (1917-1940), Opotiki News (1938-1950) and the Saturday Advertiser (July 1875-1878).”

National Library of New Zealand: Catching and describing the passing breeze

National Library of New Zealand: Catching and describing the passing breeze. “Ephemera, ‘relating to the day’, published to be of transitory use and then thrown away — such material creates a challenge for the librarian or archivist. How to collect and preserve Ephemera for future researchers? Thankfully, the Library is rising to the challenge, now not only in analogue formats but in the digital environment.”

National Library of New Zealand: Mrs Grimke’s scripture cards

National Library of New Zealand: Mrs Grimke’s scripture cards. “Last year the Library began looking into the possibilities of digitising all the publications listed in the Books in Māori bibliography. After the helpful feedback we got from the people who attended last year’s hui and some further research into the collection, we’ve decided to begin this project with two strands of work. Firstly we will digitise Te Kāhiti o Niu Tireni up to 1900, which is one of the serials listed in ‘Books in Māori’ (BIM). Te Kāhiti was the te reo version of the New Zealand Gazette, which primarily focused on applications and decisions made by the Native Land Court (later known as the Māori Land Court).”

National Library of New Zealand: Is your Facebook account an archive of the future?

National Library of New Zealand: Is your Facebook account an archive of the future?. “Over the next few months, we’re inviting New Zealanders to donate their Facebook archives to the Alexander Turnbull Library. In collecting personal Facebook archives of New Zealanders here and abroad, we will be continuing the work that has always been part of our mission: documenting the lives of New Zealanders today to support the emerging and anticipated research needs of the future.”

National Library of New Zealand: Black sheep in the family?

National Library of New Zealand: Black sheep in the family?. “What do Agnes Vallance, Agnes Skervington, Amy Laing, Amy Bennett, Amy Cameron, Amy Shannon, Amy Chanel, and Percy Redwood all have in common? Well, they are all aliases used by confidence trickster and male impersonator Amy Bock as she romped her way through New Zealand, defrauding her employees and, most notoriously, marrying a young woman in South Otago. You can now trace Amy’s career in and out of prison by searching the New Zealand Police Gazette (1877-1945). We have just made this title, along with the Canterbury Police Gazette (1863-1877) and the Otago Police Gazette (1861-1877) available and fully text searchable on Papers Past.”

National Library of New Zealand: Looking for Old Friends?

National Library of New Zealand: Looking for Old Friends?. “Old Friends (www.oldfriends.co.nz) was a popular social networking website owned by Trade Me. Its purpose was to help people locate former school friends and workmates. Members who signed up to Old Friends could upload photos, post comments, contact each other and compile information for reunions. The site was launched in 2002 and finally closed in 2016. When Trade Me announced that they would be taking the site down, the National Library quickly got in touch to see if we could work together to harvest a copy of Old Friends for the Library’s collections.”

The Flying Nun Project: Tally Ho! (National Library of New Zealand)

National Library of New Zealand: The Flying Nun Project: Tally Ho!. “Back in July 2018, we announced that the tape archive of renowned music label Flying Nun Records had been donated to the Alexander Turnbull Library. This news received media coverage from TVNZ, Radio NZ, Stuff, NZ Herald, The Spinoff and other outlets, as well as inspiring discussion on blogs and social media. Much interest stemmed from the plan to digitise the archive over three years – an urgent task given the global challenge of preserving magnetic tape AV media. Ten months on, the time is ripe for an update about how the Flying Nun Project is getting on, together with some exciting (new) news – and an unreleased recording to whet your appetite!”

The Turnbull Library Record: Past and Future (National Library of New Zealand)

National Library of New Zealand: The Turnbull Library Record: Past and Future. “Unscrupulous scholars, courtship and marriage in colonial New Zealand, women photographers, pirates, Joan of Arc, a 17th-century Persian manuscript, Earp’s bee library, the library and the cosmos – the intriguing and wide-ranging scope of articles in the Turnbull Library Record (TLR) reflects the richness of the Turnbull collections. I’ve been involved with the TLR for 10 years; eight of those as Managing Editor. It has been a real privilege to have helped bring each issue into the light of day, to work with contributors and designers to help shape its content and aesthetic impact – the stratospheric improvement of the latter having been a bar raised by its previous editor, Peter Ireland. It has also been a privilege to have been involved with the journal at this exciting time in the trajectory of its history – the moment of its digitisation.”

Scoop NZ: Complete online record of 150 years of discovery

Scoop NZ: Complete online record of 150 years of discovery. “All copies of the Transactions of the Royal Society of New Zealand, one of New Zealand’s most important research publications, are now available online, thanks to a collaborative project between Royal Society Te Apārangi and the National Library of New Zealand. The project has filled in the missing years between 1961 and 1970.”

National Library of New Zealand: Collecting social media a bite at a time

National Library of New Zealand: Collecting social media a bite at a time. “New Zealanders are discussing important issues on social media. We want to ensure that the issues that are important to us today are documented and preserved for the future.” Interesting series.