Salt Lake Tribune: 115 arches were left out of the reduced Bears Ears and Grand Staircase national monuments. A University of Utah team is creating a digital archive to ‘preserve’ them.

Salt Lake Tribune: 115 arches were left out of the reduced Bears Ears and Grand Staircase national monuments. A University of Utah team is creating a digital archive to ‘preserve’ them.. “[Researchers] have mapped at least 115 natural rock arches — 37 in Grand Staircase and 78 in Bears Ears — that were left outside the monuments when they were drastically reduced in December 2017. The group started a digital archive to ‘preserve a sort of portrait’ of them all, said Jeff Moore, associate professor of geology and geophysics at the U.”

Washington Secretary of State: State Parks And Rec Gives Thanks For Massive CCC Photo-scanning Project

Washington Secretary of State: State Parks And Rec Gives Thanks For Massive CCC Photo-scanning Project. “The Washington State Archives’ Digital Projects Archivists Maggie Cogswell and Mary Hammer led the way in completing a massive, 11-year project digitizing and cataloging photos of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) from the Washington State Parks and Recreation Commission. This collection of 2,396 photographs shows work conducted on Washington state parks by the CCC from 1933 to 1938, and includes images of Moran, Lewis and Clark, Deception Pass, Millersylvania, Riverside, Rainbow Falls, Carkeek, Denny Park, Mt. Spokane, Saltwater, Beacon Rock, Gingko, and Twanoh State Parks.”

Arizona State University: Marking 100 years of Grand Canyon National Park history

Arizona State University: Marking 100 years of Grand Canyon National Park history. “For the first time ever, thousands of high-quality archival materials — photographs, documents and correspondence — chronicling the early history of the Grand Canyon National Park (1890–1940) have been made digitally available to the public through a partnership between Arizona State University Library, Cline Library of Northern Arizona University, and the Grand Canyon National Park.”

National Parks Conservation Association: Eliminating Species Act: Senate Legislation Threatens Wildlife and Wild Lands

National Parks Conservation Association: Eliminating Species Act: Senate Legislation Threatens Wildlife and Wild Lands. “Senator John Barrasso hosted a hearing today in the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works (EPW) on his draft Endangered Species Act Amendments of 2018 legislation. The draft bill proposes to radically weaken the Endangered Species Act, which has been the nation’s most effective law protecting wildlife in danger of extinction. The legislation undermines reliance on best available science and reduces public involvement in the process of adding ESA protections to species. The more than 500 plant and animal species with habitat in our national parks are chronicled in a new online database, launched this week by National Parks Conservation Association.”

National Park Foundation: National Park Foundation Announces Pic Your Park Instagram Contest

National Park Foundation: National Park Foundation Announces Pic Your Park Instagram Contest. “A new Instagram contest launched by the National Park Foundation, the official nonprofit partner of the National Park Service, is inviting park goers – amateur and experienced – to submit pictures of themselves in national parks for the chance to win a variety of prizes. The contest, called Pic Your Park, is open now through September 28.”

EcoWatch: Nearly 100 Climate Action Plans for National Parks Removed From Website

EcoWatch: Nearly 100 Climate Action Plans for National Parks Removed From Website. “Climate change is a major challenge to America’s beloved National Parks—from hotter, drier conditions that can spark intense wildfires that can permanently alter Yosemite’s landscapes, to sea level rise triggered by warming temperatures that threaten the Everglades. In fact, nearly 100 parks have been preparing for and adapting to the damaging effects of climate change for years under the National Park Service’s ‘Climate Friendly Parks Program’ (CFP). However, you’ll no longer be able to easily find these well-documented efforts to reduce emissions and move to more sustainable operations—that’s because their work has been completely scrubbed from the Climate Friendly Parks Program website, a watchdog group has found.”

Phys.org: Visitor patterns and emerging activities in national parks revealed by social media posts

Phys.org: Visitor patterns and emerging activities in national parks revealed by social media posts. “Social media data provide a reliable information to support decision making in national parks. Researchers from the Digital Geography at the University of Helsinki have been studying whether social media data could be used to understand visitor’s activities in national parks and most recent results are presented in Scientific reports: ‘Instagram, Flickr, or Twitter: Assessing the usability of social media data for visitor monitoring in protected areas.'”