University of Hawaii: $1M to UH and collaborators to develop web-based research tool

University of Hawaii: $1M to UH and collaborators to develop web-based research tool. “The National Science Foundation has awarded the University of Hawaiʻi’s Hawaiʻi Data Science Institute (HI-DSI) $1 million for the development of a web-based programming interface called Tapis, in partnership with the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) and the University of Texas at Austin. The development of Tapis will provide scientists with important tools to gather data and conduct computationally intensive research. The framework, which will serve a diverse group of users, can help automate and streamline large workflows or pipelines of software applications and allow scientists easier, user-friendly access to computational resources.”

Alaska Native News: National Science Foundation Supports Additional Alutiiq Language Research

Alaska Native News: National Science Foundation Supports Additional Alutiiq Language Research. “With a $56,462 grant from the National Science Foundation (award #1360839), the Alutiiq Museum will extend its Naken–Natmen (Where From–Where To) language project for an additional year. First funded in 2014, the multi-year project improved access to Alutiiq language resources by developing an online archive of Alutiiq recordings, creating an Alutiiq speaker registry, and planning future language documentation projects. Now, a supplemental grant will allow the museum to study rare examples of written Alutiiq preserved in historic texts.”

CNET: Amazon to fund $10M to improve fairness in AI research

CNET: Amazon to fund $10M to improve fairness in AI research. “Amazon is giving money to broaden AI acceptance. The e-commerce giant on Monday said it’s working with the National Science Foundation (NSF) to commit up to $10 million each in research grants over the next three years to help improve fairness in artificial intelligence.”

Chronicle of Higher Education: If History Is Any Guide, End of Federal Shutdown Won’t Bring Quick Relief for College Researchers

Chronicle of Higher Education: If History Is Any Guide, End of Federal Shutdown Won’t Bring Quick Relief for College Researchers. “Neal F. Lane didn’t mince words when he spoke at the 1996 American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting, in Baltimore. On the heels of a 21-day government shutdown, then the longest in U.S. history, the National Science Foundation’s director was reeling. Funds for many continuing grants had run out. He expected funding gaps for renewals and delays in funding new awards. New programs could be pushed back significantly — perhaps six months to a year — or canceled. The shutdown, he said, had ‘demoralized our work force and destroyed any efficient timetable for our already pressured work.'”

The Verge: How The Government Shutdown Could Harm The Future Of American Science

The Verge: How The Government Shutdown Could Harm The Future Of American Science. “Graduate students and early-career researchers are watching what the government has done to their colleagues at shuttered federal agencies like the National Science Foundation and the Department of the Interior, and they’re not liking what they’re seeing. For some, the ongoing threat of government shutdowns isn’t enough to change their career goals. But for others, it’s making them rethink whether a career in the federal government is really worth the frustration. ‘I don’t know if I want a job that could be used as a pawn to further someone’s agenda,’ says Kathleen Farley, a graduate student at Rutgers University-Newark.”

Nature: Scientists despair as US government shutdown drags on

Nature: Scientists despair as US government shutdown drags on. “As the shutdown hits the two-week mark with no end in sight, its effects on science have begun to compound, leaving many government researchers weary, worried and demoralized. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has suspended reviews of grant proposals indefinitely, and is likely to delay panels scheduled to judge applications for postdoctoral fellowships in early January. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has taken widely used weather and climate databases offline. And at NASA, the shutdown threatens to disrupt preparations for upcoming spacecraft launches.”

National Science Foundation: NSF supports development of new nationwide data storage network

National Science Foundation: NSF supports development of new nationwide data storage network. “The National Science Foundation (NSF) is announcing a $1.8 million grant for the initial development of a data storage network over the next two years. A collaborative team will combine their expertise, facilities and research challenges to develop the Open Storage Network (OSN). OSN will enable academic researchers across the nation to work with and share their data more efficiently than ever before.”