University of Central Florida: UCF Researchers Help Restore the Lost History of Indigenous Prisoners in St. Augustine

University of Central Florida: UCF Researchers Help Restore the Lost History of Indigenous Prisoners in St. Augustine. “During the Plains Wars of the mid-1800s, thousands of indigenous peoples were forced from their homelands. Dozens of their leaders and warriors were imprisoned over a thousand miles away from home in Fort Marion (now known as the Castillo de San Marcos) in St. Augustine, Florida. Today, UCF researchers are collaborating with the Cheyenne and Arapaho tribes of Oklahoma, the National Park Service, the Florida National Guard and Flagler College to help restore the lost prisoners’ experiences for their descendants and the public.”

Reuniting Makers and Masterpieces: Introduction (Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma)

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma: Reuniting Makers and Masterpieces: Introduction. “This project worked to systematically search state-by-state through collections for our ancestors and their funerary objects. As we were contacting these institutions, we also asked them if their collections contained non-funerary objects of Choctaw traditional art. Historic Preservation put together a simple online database to begin sharing these pieces of traditional art held in institutions all over the country with community members.”

Smithsonian: Online Native Cinema Showcase Brings Indigenous Films to Audiences Worldwide

Smithsonian: Online Native Cinema Showcase Brings Indigenous Films to Audiences Worldwide. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian’s Native Cinema Showcase returns to an online format Nov. 18–25 for American Indian Heritage Month. An annual celebration of the best in Indigenous film, the selections show how filmmakers are embracing their communities’ oral histories, knowledge and ancestral lands to seek guidance from the past and envision new paths for the future.” All films are free and available on demand. Two films require registration to view.

US Government Accountability Office: Efforts to Protect and Repatriate Native American Cultural Items and Human Remains

US Government Accountability Office: Efforts to Protect and Repatriate Native American Cultural Items and Human Remains. “Despite federal legislation calling for their protection and repatriation, cultural items located on federal and Indian lands remain vulnerable to theft, vandalism, and destruction. Moreover, a 2020 report estimated that there are more than 116,000 Native American human remains still in museums and other collections. For Native American Heritage Month (November), today’s WatchBlog post looks at our recent work on federal efforts to protect Native American cultural items.”

Capital Gazette: Maryland State Archives launches Native American history research tool on Indigenous Peoples’ Day

Capital Gazette: Maryland State Archives launches Native American history research tool on Indigenous Peoples’ Day. “The Maryland State Archives launched a new website on Indigenous Peoples’ Day Monday that allows students, residents and visitors to research Native American tribes and events in Maryland history…. It allows students, researchers and Maryland residents or visitors to search records featuring the history of words or places with native names using various search functions.”

NBC News: Search for missing Native artifacts led to the discovery of bodies stored in ‘the most inhumane way possible’

NBC News: Search for missing Native artifacts led to the discovery of bodies stored in ‘the most inhumane way possible’. “Since the passage of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) in 1990, federal law has required institutions that receive federal funding to catalog their collections with the National Parks Service and work toward returning them to the tribal nations they were taken from. But the University of North Dakota has no entries in the federal inventory, even though its administrators acknowledge it has possessed Indigenous artifacts since its inception in 1883.”

University of Maryland: Who Owns the Sounds and Images of Native People’s Pasts?

University of Maryland: Who Owns the Sounds and Images of Native People’s Pasts?. “The last known fluent speaker of the tribe’s native Western dialect died in 2010, and the remaining tribal citizens–who traditionally don’t count their members but are estimated to number about 350 speak an amalgam of Ahtna’s Western and Central dialects. Audio recordings of Western Ahtna exist, but many are kept in mainstream archives that don’t belong to the Chickaloon tribe. Now, two University of Maryland faculty members are part of a new effort to bring those recordings, and other pieces of history, back to the Native people who lived the stories within them.”

NBC News: Lakota elders helped a white man preserve their language. Then he tried to sell it back to them.

NBC News: Lakota elders helped a white man preserve their language. Then he tried to sell it back to them.. “The Lakota Language Consortium had promised to preserve the tribe’s native language and had spent years gathering recordings of elders, including Taken Alive’s grandmother, to create a new, standardized Lakota dictionary and textbooks. But when [Ray] Taken Alive, 35, asked for copies, he was shocked to learn that the consortium, run by a white man, had copyrighted the language materials, which were based on generations of Lakota tradition.”

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian To Launch “Ancestors Know Who We Are” June 15

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian To Launch “Ancestors Know Who We Are” June 15. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian will launch the digital exhibition ‘Ancestors Know Who We Are’ June 15. The exhibition features works by six contemporary Black-Indigenous women artists that address issues of race, gender, multiracial identity and intergenerational knowledge.”

Raven Radio: Southeast Native Radio aired for just 16 years, but its voices will live on in a new digital archive

Raven Radio: Southeast Native Radio aired for just 16 years, but its voices will live on in a new digital archive . “Southeast Native Radio was broadcast over KTOO in Juneau for 16 years, from 1985 to 2001. The volunteer-produced show played as current affairs at the time, but twenty-one years later it’s become a window into the lives of the people and events that shaped Native culture in the region over the last century.”

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art. “What is known is that these caves are regarded as sacred places by Native Americans in the American Southeast—considered pathways to the underworld. This is why researchers theorize that the anthropomorphic figures may have been spiritually important. These massive figures are also described in the study as ‘invisible.’ The cave is so cramped, and etchings so faint, that the artwork was overlooked when researchers entered the chamber more than 20 years ago. To solve this, the study team used a technique known as high-resolution 3D photogrammetry to digitally manipulate the chamber space and reveal the artwork.”