University of Maryland: Who Owns the Sounds and Images of Native People’s Pasts?

University of Maryland: Who Owns the Sounds and Images of Native People’s Pasts?. “The last known fluent speaker of the tribe’s native Western dialect died in 2010, and the remaining tribal citizens–who traditionally don’t count their members but are estimated to number about 350 speak an amalgam of Ahtna’s Western and Central dialects. Audio recordings of Western Ahtna exist, but many are kept in mainstream archives that don’t belong to the Chickaloon tribe. Now, two University of Maryland faculty members are part of a new effort to bring those recordings, and other pieces of history, back to the Native people who lived the stories within them.”

US Department of Education: Funding Available to Support Native Language Revitalization

US Department of Education: Funding Available to Support Native Language Revitalization. “Advancing its commitment to maintaining, protecting, and revitalizing Native American languages – the U.S. Department of Education has announced approximately $1 million in grant funding available for Native American Language (NAL@ED) projects.”

NBC News: Lakota elders helped a white man preserve their language. Then he tried to sell it back to them.

NBC News: Lakota elders helped a white man preserve their language. Then he tried to sell it back to them.. “The Lakota Language Consortium had promised to preserve the tribe’s native language and had spent years gathering recordings of elders, including Taken Alive’s grandmother, to create a new, standardized Lakota dictionary and textbooks. But when [Ray] Taken Alive, 35, asked for copies, he was shocked to learn that the consortium, run by a white man, had copyrighted the language materials, which were based on generations of Lakota tradition.”

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian To Launch “Ancestors Know Who We Are” June 15

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian To Launch “Ancestors Know Who We Are” June 15. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian will launch the digital exhibition ‘Ancestors Know Who We Are’ June 15. The exhibition features works by six contemporary Black-Indigenous women artists that address issues of race, gender, multiracial identity and intergenerational knowledge.”

Raven Radio: Southeast Native Radio aired for just 16 years, but its voices will live on in a new digital archive

Raven Radio: Southeast Native Radio aired for just 16 years, but its voices will live on in a new digital archive . “Southeast Native Radio was broadcast over KTOO in Juneau for 16 years, from 1985 to 2001. The volunteer-produced show played as current affairs at the time, but twenty-one years later it’s become a window into the lives of the people and events that shaped Native culture in the region over the last century.”

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art. “What is known is that these caves are regarded as sacred places by Native Americans in the American Southeast—considered pathways to the underworld. This is why researchers theorize that the anthropomorphic figures may have been spiritually important. These massive figures are also described in the study as ‘invisible.’ The cave is so cramped, and etchings so faint, that the artwork was overlooked when researchers entered the chamber more than 20 years ago. To solve this, the study team used a technique known as high-resolution 3D photogrammetry to digitally manipulate the chamber space and reveal the artwork.”

Library of Congress: Library to Celebrate Joy Harjo’s Three Terms as U.S. Poet Laureate with Reading, Dance Party and Retreat

Library of Congress: Library to Celebrate Joy Harjo’s Three Terms as U.S. Poet Laureate with Reading, Dance Party and Retreat. “The Library of Congress will celebrate Joy Harjo, the first Native American U.S. poet laureate, as her three terms in the position come to a conclusion with two public programs at the end of April.” The closing event takes place tomorrow night (Thursday, April 28) and will be livestreamed.

Mashable: Spiritual hustlers are all over social media. Don’t let them scam you.

Mashable: Spiritual hustlers are all over social media. Don’t let them scam you.. “Social media accounts peddling Native-esque wisdom are saturated with imagery such as feathers, sage bundles, abalone shells, dreamcatchers, flutes, and hand drums. Links in those accounts’ bios invite you to participate in sweat lodges, soul healing sessions, medium readings, shamanic circles, and quantum healing. Posts advertise workshops for hundreds of dollars that give you exclusive access to privileged information meant to help on your life’s journey. Hashtags like #medicineman and #medicinewoman offer glimpses of this at play.”

OU Daily: Sam Noble Museum receives federal grant to create online database for Native American Languages Collection

OU Daily (University of Oklahoma): Sam Noble Museum receives federal grant to create online database for Native American Languages Collection. “The Sam Noble Museum of Natural History received a $345,494 federal grant to add and improve online access to the Native American Languages Collection. The grant is to be used over three years to create an online collection of 9,000 pieces with over 1,300 Indigenous languages included for public use.”

Montana State University: MSU’s Woodcock-Medicine Horse receives grant to create contemporary Indigenous art website

Montana State University: MSU’s Woodcock-Medicine Horse receives grant to create contemporary Indigenous art website. “A Montana State University art history and Native American studies instructor and the Little Shell Tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana have received a $50,000 grant from the National Endowment of the Humanities to create a multimedia website showcasing contemporary Native American art of the region.”

‘You’re all on the same team’: Junior Native Youth Olympics bring Alaskan kids together (Alaska Public Media)

Alaska Public Media: ‘You’re all on the same team’: Junior Native Youth Olympics bring Alaskan kids together. “The Native Youth Olympic Games test athletic abilities required to survive in Alaska. The games were traditionally used to build the strength, endurance and teamwork needed for subsistence activities like hunting and foraging. This year’s Junior Native Youth Olympic Games are virtual, with nearly 300 participants sending in videos of themselves competing in the events.”

Penn State University: Libraries launches Library Guide for Indigenous Peoples in Pennsylvania History

Penn State University: Libraries launches Library Guide for Indigenous Peoples in Pennsylvania History. “Penn State University Libraries recently completed development of a new Library Guide to Indigenous Peoples in Pennsylvania History. Finalized in November, in time for the observance of Native American Heritage Month, the Library Guide is a collection of resources related to the history of Native Americans in Pennsylvania, including maps, treaties and land appropriations.”

Google Blog: The new Indigenous Americas hub on Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: The new Indigenous Americas hub on Google Arts & Culture. “On the occasion of Native American Heritage Month in the United States, we are proud to be collaborating with Google Arts & Culture and over 40 other cultural institutions to bring online 90+ stories to the new Indigenous Americas hub: a collection of Indigenous art and culture that spans beyond the U.S. and across the Americas to make these stories available to anyone, anywhere in the world.”

Penn State: Multi-university project to focus on language and history of the Choctaw Nation

Penn State: Multi-university project to focus on language and history of the Choctaw Nation. “Working with a ‘rare and rich’ digital archive of 19th-century Choctaw language court documents, Penn State history scholars and graduate students are partnering with linguists from the University of Florida on a multi-faceted initiative called the Choctaw Language and History Workshop. The project, which promotes a new model for graduate students studying Native American history, will have multiple deliverables, including several scholarly articles and a Choctaw language dictionary developed in consultation with the Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians.”

Library of Congress: Celebrate Native American Heritage Month with U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo and New Resources from the Library of Congress

Library of Congress: Celebrate Native American Heritage Month with U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo and New Resources from the Library of Congress. “‘Living Nations, Living Words’ is Harjo’s signature project as U.S. Poet Laureate. With an emphasis on poetry, and sharing and elevating the voices of living Native poets, the project consists of two main components: a story map and a poetry collection. Together, they present works by 47 Native poets that explore the themes of place and displacement, as well as the ‘touchpoints’ of persistence, resistance, acknowledgment and visibility.”