NPR: The 400 Years Project Looks At Native American Identity Through The Native Lens

Launched late last year and new-to-me, from NPR: The 400 Years Project Looks At Native American Identity Through The Native Lens . “‘The Mayflower and its aftermath has become the first and most culturally iconic story told to many young Americans about the country’s founding and initial relationships with Native people,’ says photographer Sarah Stacke. ‘But the stories they’re told of a golden age of friendship, new beginnings, and untouched wilderness, is a myth.’ Correcting those myths and looking at the evolution of Native American identity over the last 400 years is the mission of The 400 Years Project, a pictorial collection of Native American life. It includes original photo essays, text essays and a digital library of Native photographers from the mid-1800s to the present.”

KNBA: Museums, Native heritage organizations look to future of digital collection, repatriation

KNBA: Museums, Native heritage organizations look to future of digital collection, repatriation. “The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act certainly has its flaws. But museums and Native cultural organizations look to the future of digital collections and repatriation. The Alutiiq Museum, which is based in Kodiak, will begin to digitize its collection with the eventual goal of expanding and digitizing collections from other museums.”

KULR: Blackfeet woman creates international travel website and app to share history, resources, information

KULR: Blackfeet woman creates international travel website and app to share history, resources, information. “A Blackfeet woman has started a non-profit organization to gather and share information, resources, and history of the tribe with travelers across Montana and Canada. The project promotes interaction and contribution from the public. Souta Calling Last collects centuries worth of information through storytelling, factual data, and social trends to help tribal members and tourists better understand the area where they live or explore.”

DigitalNC: Fill-In Batch of The Carolina Indian Voice Now Online

DigitalNC: Fill-In Batch of The Carolina Indian Voice Now Online. “DigitalNC is happy to announce a new batch of digitized newspaper issues from The Carolina Indian Voice. This round of issues includes most of 1976, all of 1977, and fill-ins for the years 1979-1996. These additions have brought us that much closer to a complete online collection of The Voice. We would like to thank our partners at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for providing the physical issues that made this possible.”

Muskogee Phoenix: Muscogee (Creek) Nation National Library and Archives receives grant

Muskogee Phoenix: Muscogee (Creek) Nation National Library and Archives receives grant. “The project will include 40 oral history interviews from Muscogee citizens and community members concerning their experiences with the COVID-19 pandemic. The grant will also aid in the purchase of oral history recording equipment and supplies, the creation of a digital archive and Oral History Research Station, located in the MCN National Library and Archives, and the creation of a library website.”

National Archives News: New Finding Aid Improves Search for Native American Photos

National Archives News: New Finding Aid Improves Search for Native American Photos. “It is now easier than ever to search through more than 18,000 digitized photos from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, thanks to a new finding aid from the National Archives and Records Administration. Released on November 19, 2020, the finding aid presents more than a century of archived photographs of Native American communities from the National Archives Catalog in a researcher-friendly format, searchable by Tribal Nation, topic, or state.”

NET Nebraska: Digital Archive Catalogues Abuses Of Genoa Indian School

NET Nebraska: Digital Archive Catalogues Abuses Of Genoa Indian School. “From its opening in 1884 until its decommissioning in 1934, the Genoa Indian School in Genoa, Nebraska harbored Native American children with the goal of destroying native culture through assimilation. Now, there’s a digital project that seeks to document the experiences of those who attended for future generations.”

University of Arkansas Little Rock: UA Little Rock’s Sequoyah National Research Center creates website visualizing American Indian removal through Arkansas

University of Arkansas Little Rock: UA Little Rock’s Sequoyah National Research Center creates website visualizing American Indian removal through Arkansas. “The center has completed a two-year research project, ‘Journey of Survival: Indian Removal Through Arkansas,’ that includes a website and interactive touchscreen table that visually maps the journey of American Indians who journeyed through Arkansas after the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The project was funded by a grant from the Arkansas Natural and Cultural Resources Council.”

WBUR: Online Exhibit At Harvard’s Peabody Museum Elevates Wampanoag Voices

WBUR: Online Exhibit At Harvard’s Peabody Museum Elevates Wampanoag Voices. “‘Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620’ features artists, storytellers and researchers, discussing some of their cultural items and photographs that are housed in the museum’s collection. “Early on, we decided to blur the focus on the 17th century,” says Meredith Vasta, collections steward at the Peabody. ‘We wanted to look at more contemporary lives and perspectives of Wampanoag people.’”

The Alcatraz Logbook: Signs of Red Power (Autry Museum of the American West)

Autry Museum of the American West: The Alcatraz Logbook: Signs of Red Power . “On November 20, 1969, a group of Native Americans landed and occupied Alcatraz Island for 19 months. The initial group of over eighty occupiers referred to themselves as ‘Indians of All Tribes’ reflecting the diversity of Native Americans in the Bay Area during this time period…Much of the history of the occupation and its key players have been recorded elsewhere, but one key element of the story has been missing. A logbook of those who visited the island exists and is presented here to the public for the first time.”

Smithsonian Magazine: A Native American Community in Baltimore Reclaims Its History

Smithsonian Magazine: A Native American Community in Baltimore Reclaims Its History. “Baltimore may be famous for John Waters, Edgar Allan Poe, and steamed crabs, but very few people are aware that there was once a sizeable population of American Indians, the Lumbee tribe, who lived in the neighborhoods of Upper Fells Point and Washington Hill. By the 1960s, there were so many Native Americans living in the area that many Lumbee affectionately referred to it as ‘The Reservation.’ In the early 1970s, this part of Baltimore underwent a massive urban renewal development project and many Lumbee residences were destroyed, including most of the 1700 block of East Baltimore Street.”

New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs: MIAC Presents Virtual Event for New Online Treaties Explorer Resource

New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs: MIAC Presents Virtual Event for New Online Treaties Explorer Resource. “The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC), in partnership with the U.S. National Archives Office of Innovation, is pleased to announce an online launch event of the Indigenous Digital Archive’s Treaties Explorer, also known as ‘DigiTreaties.’ Thanks to an anonymous donor, the U.S. National Archives has been able to conserve and make the first-ever scans of its holdings of 374 Ratified Indian Treaties.”

NPR: How A Graphic Novel Resurrected A Forgotten Chapter In American History

NPR: How A Graphic Novel Resurrected A Forgotten Chapter In American History. “Ghost River: The Fall and Rise of the Conestoga, a new graphic novel and art exhibit, depicts a gruesome, footnoted event in American history — the Conestoga Massacre. The massacre was an act of brutality that killed an entire community of Native people and almost erased their voices from history. Ghost River hopes to give that voice back, reenvisioning the events through the eyes of Native people. (The comic is available to read online. A free exhibit featuring art from the book is running at the Library Company of Philadelphia until April.)”