NET Nebraska: Digital Archive Catalogues Abuses Of Genoa Indian School

NET Nebraska: Digital Archive Catalogues Abuses Of Genoa Indian School. “From its opening in 1884 until its decommissioning in 1934, the Genoa Indian School in Genoa, Nebraska harbored Native American children with the goal of destroying native culture through assimilation. Now, there’s a digital project that seeks to document the experiences of those who attended for future generations.”

University of Arkansas Little Rock: UA Little Rock’s Sequoyah National Research Center creates website visualizing American Indian removal through Arkansas

University of Arkansas Little Rock: UA Little Rock’s Sequoyah National Research Center creates website visualizing American Indian removal through Arkansas. “The center has completed a two-year research project, ‘Journey of Survival: Indian Removal Through Arkansas,’ that includes a website and interactive touchscreen table that visually maps the journey of American Indians who journeyed through Arkansas after the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The project was funded by a grant from the Arkansas Natural and Cultural Resources Council.”

WBUR: Online Exhibit At Harvard’s Peabody Museum Elevates Wampanoag Voices

WBUR: Online Exhibit At Harvard’s Peabody Museum Elevates Wampanoag Voices. “‘Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620’ features artists, storytellers and researchers, discussing some of their cultural items and photographs that are housed in the museum’s collection. “Early on, we decided to blur the focus on the 17th century,” says Meredith Vasta, collections steward at the Peabody. ‘We wanted to look at more contemporary lives and perspectives of Wampanoag people.'”

The Alcatraz Logbook: Signs of Red Power (Autry Museum of the American West)

Autry Museum of the American West: The Alcatraz Logbook: Signs of Red Power . “On November 20, 1969, a group of Native Americans landed and occupied Alcatraz Island for 19 months. The initial group of over eighty occupiers referred to themselves as ‘Indians of All Tribes’ reflecting the diversity of Native Americans in the Bay Area during this time period…Much of the history of the occupation and its key players have been recorded elsewhere, but one key element of the story has been missing. A logbook of those who visited the island exists and is presented here to the public for the first time.”

Smithsonian Magazine: A Native American Community in Baltimore Reclaims Its History

Smithsonian Magazine: A Native American Community in Baltimore Reclaims Its History. “Baltimore may be famous for John Waters, Edgar Allan Poe, and steamed crabs, but very few people are aware that there was once a sizeable population of American Indians, the Lumbee tribe, who lived in the neighborhoods of Upper Fells Point and Washington Hill. By the 1960s, there were so many Native Americans living in the area that many Lumbee affectionately referred to it as ‘The Reservation.’ In the early 1970s, this part of Baltimore underwent a massive urban renewal development project and many Lumbee residences were destroyed, including most of the 1700 block of East Baltimore Street.”

New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs: MIAC Presents Virtual Event for New Online Treaties Explorer Resource

New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs: MIAC Presents Virtual Event for New Online Treaties Explorer Resource. “The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC), in partnership with the U.S. National Archives Office of Innovation, is pleased to announce an online launch event of the Indigenous Digital Archive’s Treaties Explorer, also known as ‘DigiTreaties.’ Thanks to an anonymous donor, the U.S. National Archives has been able to conserve and make the first-ever scans of its holdings of 374 Ratified Indian Treaties.”

Cornell University Library: Artifacts from upstate Indigenous towns digitized, repatriated

Cornell University Library: Artifacts from upstate Indigenous towns digitized, repatriated. “Unearthed, digitized and soon to be repatriated, artifacts from two Native American towns are beginning to share their rich stories online thanks to a collaborative project by anthropologists, librarians and Indigenous community members.”

NPR: How A Graphic Novel Resurrected A Forgotten Chapter In American History

NPR: How A Graphic Novel Resurrected A Forgotten Chapter In American History. “Ghost River: The Fall and Rise of the Conestoga, a new graphic novel and art exhibit, depicts a gruesome, footnoted event in American history — the Conestoga Massacre. The massacre was an act of brutality that killed an entire community of Native people and almost erased their voices from history. Ghost River hopes to give that voice back, reenvisioning the events through the eyes of Native people. (The comic is available to read online. A free exhibit featuring art from the book is running at the Library Company of Philadelphia until April.)”

Crosscut: Closing Seattle’s National Archives is a ‘paper genocide’ for some Natives

Crosscut: Closing Seattle’s National Archives is a ‘paper genocide’ for some Natives. “In displacing Native peoples, identities have been imprinted, often very imperfectly, on the documents here. David Z. Bean, chairman of the Puyallup Tribe, described in a letter objecting to the closure of the archives that they contain not only original treaties and drafts from the mid-19th century, but original correspondence with Indian agents and records ‘associated with litigation that document the Tribe’s effort to protect our treaty rights and territory.’ Moving them, he wrote, would have a ‘profound, negative and irreparable impact.’ Tribes, it should be noted, were not systematically consulted in advance of the decision to close the archives and sell off the property.”

KVAL: UO museum works to digitize collection of fragile Native American baskets

KVAL: UO museum works to digitize collection of fragile Native American baskets. “Close up and through a camera – that’s what’s happening quietly behind the scenes at the University of Oregon Museum of Natural and Cultural History….Teams from the museum are digitizing the UO’s entire collection of historic Native American baskets, a project made possible through grants from the State Heritage Commission and other sources.” There’s a video news story that goes with this — about two and a half minutes — that’s worth watching.

Daily Bruin: New online maps documents Native American ancestral territory at Fowler

New-to-me, from the Daily Bruin: New online maps documents Native American ancestral territory at Fowler. “Current literature on indigenous Los Angeles rarely comes from those doing work inside tribal communities. Wendy Teeter, curator of archaeology at the Fowler Museum, will be giving a lecture at the Fowler Museum on Wednesday to discuss the web-based project ‘Mapping Indigenous Los Angeles.'”

National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition: National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Announces Ten-year Strategic Plan And Receives $10m Grant

National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition: National Native American Boarding School Healing Coalition Announces Ten-year Strategic Plan And Receives $10m Grant. “The new plan consists of four strategic pillars focusing the organization’s work in global advocacy, healing values and practices, organizational infrastructure and education; a number of positive outcomes are expected for each. These include establishing a national truth and healing center, developing curriculum, producing a documentary series, creating a national digital archive and issuing policy statements that support the work of tribes and other agencies related to boarding schools.”

Lexington Herald-Leader: Collaboration key to assembling Native American photo trove

Lexington Herald-Leader: Collaboration key to assembling Native American photo trove. “Of the roughly 1,000 images of Native Americans from the 19th through the early 20th century, Eric Hemenway kept returning to one: a lone woman hoeing potatoes in a Michigan garden. The director of archives and records for the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians was poring over boxes of photos in the Clements Library of University of Michigan, which acquired the rare trove from a collector. Others might be drawn to Sitting Bull staring into the camera lens, or Geronimo posing with this elite band before capture. But for Hemenway, the picture of Viola Assinaway, an ancestor through marriage, is commonplace yet compelling: It offers visual proof of his people’s continuous presence.”

University of North Carolina: Archaeologists open ‘virtual museum’ of ancient NC history online

University of North Carolina: Archaeologists open ‘virtual museum’ of ancient NC history online. “The public got its first peek at decades of work by Carolina archaeologists when the new interactive website, Ancient North Carolinians: A Virtual Museum of North Carolina Archaeology, launched Nov. 15. Using lesson plans, travel guides and a gallery of 3D artifact images, AncientNC raises awareness of the 15,000-year history of North Carolina’s indigenous populations and provides educational resources for the state’s teachers and students.”

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford. “The graves of hundreds of African Americans and Native Americans lie in downtown Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground, but without headstones they remain invisible. Excluded from official records or referred to only by race, their stories remain as hidden as their graves. Four centuries after enslaved people were first brought to America, a new project organized by the Ancient Burying Ground Association investigates hundreds of these untold stories. ‘Uncovering Their History’ shares the stories of colonists of color: an enslaved couple given away as a wedding present, black men who joined the Continental Navy in hopes of obtaining their freedom, Native American doctors and servants.”