Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian To Launch “Ancestors Know Who We Are” June 15

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian To Launch “Ancestors Know Who We Are” June 15. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian will launch the digital exhibition ‘Ancestors Know Who We Are’ June 15. The exhibition features works by six contemporary Black-Indigenous women artists that address issues of race, gender, multiracial identity and intergenerational knowledge.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: 3D scan will reveal the stories hidden within 1,200-year-old Wisconsin canoe

University of Wisconsin-Madison: 3D scan will reveal the stories hidden within 1,200-year-old Wisconsin canoe. “[Lennon] Rodgers — who directs the Grainger Engineering Design and Innovation Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin–Madison — was there to help archaeologists better understand a 1,200-year-old, 15-foot dugout canoe recovered in 2021 from the waters of Lake Mendota, the largest of Madison’s four lakes and part of the ancestral home of the Ho-Chunk Nation. At the invitation of Wisconsin State Archaeologist James Skibo and Scott Roller, senior collections manager for the Wisconsin Historical Society, Rodgers scanned the canoe and created detailed 3D renderings that will preserve the boat’s legacy and allow researchers to study the craft while it undergoes a multiyear preservation process.”

Raven Radio: Southeast Native Radio aired for just 16 years, but its voices will live on in a new digital archive

Raven Radio: Southeast Native Radio aired for just 16 years, but its voices will live on in a new digital archive . “Southeast Native Radio was broadcast over KTOO in Juneau for 16 years, from 1985 to 2001. The volunteer-produced show played as current affairs at the time, but twenty-one years later it’s become a window into the lives of the people and events that shaped Native culture in the region over the last century.”

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art. “What is known is that these caves are regarded as sacred places by Native Americans in the American Southeast—considered pathways to the underworld. This is why researchers theorize that the anthropomorphic figures may have been spiritually important. These massive figures are also described in the study as ‘invisible.’ The cave is so cramped, and etchings so faint, that the artwork was overlooked when researchers entered the chamber more than 20 years ago. To solve this, the study team used a technique known as high-resolution 3D photogrammetry to digitally manipulate the chamber space and reveal the artwork.”

NARA: Archivist Explores History of 1950 Census Indian Reservation Schedule

NARA: Archivist Explores History of 1950 Census Indian Reservation Schedule. “Cody White, archivist and subject matter expert for Native American–related records at the National Archives and Records Administration, set out to explore the history and context of the Form P8, Indian Reservation Schedule, in the 1950 Census to better understand why the Census Bureau created an entirely separate form to be used in some communities.”

Penn State University: Libraries launches Library Guide for Indigenous Peoples in Pennsylvania History

Penn State University: Libraries launches Library Guide for Indigenous Peoples in Pennsylvania History. “Penn State University Libraries recently completed development of a new Library Guide to Indigenous Peoples in Pennsylvania History. Finalized in November, in time for the observance of Native American Heritage Month, the Library Guide is a collection of resources related to the history of Native Americans in Pennsylvania, including maps, treaties and land appropriations.”

Google Blog: The new Indigenous Americas hub on Google Arts & Culture

Google Blog: The new Indigenous Americas hub on Google Arts & Culture. “On the occasion of Native American Heritage Month in the United States, we are proud to be collaborating with Google Arts & Culture and over 40 other cultural institutions to bring online 90+ stories to the new Indigenous Americas hub: a collection of Indigenous art and culture that spans beyond the U.S. and across the Americas to make these stories available to anyone, anywhere in the world.”

Oklahoma State University: OSU Library project unveiled at White House Tribal Nations Summit

Oklahoma State University: OSU Library project unveiled at White House Tribal Nations Summit. “The new “Tribal Treaties Database” is a free public resource available at treaties.okstate.edu. The first phase of the project focuses on U.S. government treaties with Native Americans from 1778-1883. The treaties are indexed and can be browsed by tribe, treaty or location.”

Smithsonian: Native Cinema Showcase Returns as a Virtual Program With Messages of Strength and Resilience

Smithsonian: Native Cinema Showcase Returns as a Virtual Program With Messages of Strength and Resilience. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian brings its annual Native Cinema Showcase to online audiences Nov. 12–18. This year’s showcase focuses on Native people boldly asserting themselves through language, healing, building community and a continued relationship with the land. Activism lies at the heart of all these stories. The showcase provides a unique forum for engagement with Native filmmakers from Indigenous communities throughout the Western Hemisphere and Arctic.”

Willamette Week: On Indigenous People’s Day, Researchers Publish Database of Those Buried at Chemawa School

Willamette Week: On Indigenous People’s Day, Researchers Publish Database of Those Buried at Chemawa School . “In conjunction with Indigenous People’s Day, two researchers are providing public access to a new database of more than 300 people who died at Chemawa School, a federal boarding school for Indigenous people located near Salem. The genocidal legacy of boarding schools for Indigenous students received new attention this May in British Columbia, where the bodies of 215 children were discovered at one site. The history of Oregon’s schools is less known, but the two researchers examined what happened in their Washington County town.”

Associated Press: Missouri cave with ancient Native American drawings sold

Associated Press: Missouri cave with ancient Native American drawings sold. “Bryan Laughlin, director of Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers, the St. Louis-based firm handling the auction, said the winning bidder declined to be named. A St. Louis family that’s owned the land since 1953 has mainly used it for hunting. The cave was the site of sacred rituals and burying of the dead. It also has more than 290 prehistoric glyphs, or hieroglyphic symbols used to represent sounds or meanings, ‘making it the largest collection of indigenous people’s polychrome paintings in Missouri,’ according to the auction website.”

Wall Street Journal: At Schools Where Native American Children Died, New Hope for Answers

Wall Street Journal: At Schools Where Native American Children Died, New Hope for Answers. “Sifting through archived records, the volunteer group has compiled 67 names, but with little funding for more research, they have no way of knowing how many of the children are buried in Chilocco’s cemetery, which bears only a single marked grave. Theirs is one of numerous efforts by tribal historians and researchers over the past several years to uncover evidence of Native Americans who died at the boarding schools. Until now, these grass roots investigations have been stymied by limited resources and logistical hurdles. Now, those leading the projects are hoping a new federal investigation can shed light on a mystery that has haunted Indian Country for generations.”

Mississippi State University: Digitized photos from MSU Libraries’ Holder Collection unveil beauty of Montana’s Crow Indian tribe

Mississippi State University: Digitized photos from MSU Libraries’ Holder Collection unveil beauty of Montana’s Crow Indian tribe. “The photographic beauty of both the natural and built environments of Montana’s Crow Indian tribe is now easily accessible to academic researchers and U.S. history enthusiasts through Mississippi State University Libraries’ digital collections.” Not a huge collection, but good photography.