Indigeneity in All Its Complexity: Web Series and Podcast Picks (Women and Hollywood)

Women and Hollywood: Indigeneity in All Its Complexity: Web Series and Podcast Picks. “Storytelling, through different forms of media, is an effective tool in dismantling media-based prejudice against Indigenous communities. By expressing their own individual stories, Indigenous creatives reclaim the narrative and establish themselves as complex individuals, and reject the one-dimensional, or even caricatured, characters and plot lines so often employed by the media. This week’s web series and podcast picks focus on works by Native creators who shed light on the unique experiences of being Indigenous.”

Smithsonian: Native Cinema Showcase Returns as a Virtual Program With Messages of Strength and Resilience

Smithsonian: Native Cinema Showcase Returns as a Virtual Program With Messages of Strength and Resilience. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian brings its annual Native Cinema Showcase to online audiences Nov. 12–18. This year’s showcase focuses on Native people boldly asserting themselves through language, healing, building community and a continued relationship with the land. Activism lies at the heart of all these stories. The showcase provides a unique forum for engagement with Native filmmakers from Indigenous communities throughout the Western Hemisphere and Arctic.”

Johns Hopkins: New data shows COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on American Indian, Alaska Native tribes

Johns Hopkins: New data shows COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on American Indian, Alaska Native tribes. “The Johns Hopkins Coronavirus Resource Center today launched new data and maps tracking the pandemic’s impact across American Indian and Alaska Native communities. Developed in collaboration with the Johns Hopkins Center for American Indian Health and Indian Country Today, the map provides one of the most comprehensive views of how the pandemic has unfolded across more than 100 Tribal Nations.”

Willamette Week: On Indigenous People’s Day, Researchers Publish Database of Those Buried at Chemawa School

Willamette Week: On Indigenous People’s Day, Researchers Publish Database of Those Buried at Chemawa School . “In conjunction with Indigenous People’s Day, two researchers are providing public access to a new database of more than 300 people who died at Chemawa School, a federal boarding school for Indigenous people located near Salem. The genocidal legacy of boarding schools for Indigenous students received new attention this May in British Columbia, where the bodies of 215 children were discovered at one site. The history of Oregon’s schools is less known, but the two researchers examined what happened in their Washington County town.”

New York Times: Marie Wilcox, Who Saved Her Native Language From Extinction, Dies at 87

New York Times: Marie Wilcox, Who Saved Her Native Language From Extinction, Dies at 87. “For many years, Marie Wilcox was the guardian of the Wukchumni language, one of several Indigenous languages that were once common in Central California but have either disappeared or nearly disappeared. She was the only person for a time who could speak it fluently. She started writing down words in Wukchumni as she remembered them in the late 1990s, scrawling on the backs of envelopes and slips of paper. Then she started typing them into an old boxy computer. Soon she was getting up early to devote her day to gathering words and working into the night.”

News@Northeastern: The Race To Save Indigenous Languages, Using Automatic Speech Recognition

News@Northeastern: The Race To Save Indigenous Languages, Using Automatic Speech Recognition. “Growing up in the windy plains near the Northern Cheyenne Indian Reservation, [Michael] Running Wolf says that although his family—which is part Cheyenne, part Lakota—didn’t have daily access to running water or electricity, sometimes, when the winds died down, the power would flicker on, and he’d plug in his Atari console and play games with his sisters. These early experiences would spur forward a lifelong interest in computers, artificial intelligence, and software engineering that Running Wolf is now harnessing to help reawaken endangered indigenous languages in North and South America, some of which are so critically at risk of extinction that their tallies of living native speakers have dwindled into the single digits.”

New York University: NYU, University of Waikato Receive Mellon Foundation Grant to Protect Indigenous Knowledge and Data

New York University: NYU, University of Waikato Receive Mellon Foundation Grant to Protect Indigenous Knowledge and Data. “Equity for Indigenous Research and Innovation Coordinating Hub (ENRICH), launched in 2019, aims to establish and solidify Indigenous cultural authority within digital infrastructures and to increase Indigenous rights within historical records and future research…. Under the Mellon grant, ENRICH will expand its training and resources developed by and for Indigenous communities in order to bolster efforts in the United States, New Zealand, Canada, and Australia to properly connect Indigenous cultural material and data to present-day communities and to establish cultural authority as well as intellectual property legal protections over them.”

Getty: Wupatki National Monument in Arizona Receives $1.3 Million Conservation Grant

Getty: Wupatki National Monument in Arizona Receives $1.3 Million Conservation Grant. “Once home to the ancestors of the Hopi, Zuni, Navajo, Yavapai, Havasupai, Hualapai, and several bands of Apache and Paiute, the Wupatki National Monument in Northern Arizona holds a precious record of migration, trade, and other practices dating back to the 11th century. The Center for Architectural Conservation at the University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design has received a $1.3 million grant from Getty to develop a conservation and management plan and professional training program for the site, which faces a variety of threats.”

US Department of Justice: 12 Tribes Selected For Participation In Program Enhancing Tribal Access To National Crime Information Databases

US Department of Justice: 12 Tribes Selected For Participation In Program Enhancing Tribal Access To National Crime Information Databases. “The Department of Justice has selected an additional 12 federally recognized tribes to participate in the expansion of the Tribal Access Program for National Crime Information (TAP), a program that provides tribal governments with means to access, enter, and exchange data with national crime information systems, including those maintained by the FBI Criminal Justice Information Services (CJIS) Division and the states.”

Smithsonian: Smithsonian To Host the Virtual Symposium “The Other Slavery” Sept. 24–27

Smithsonian: Smithsonian To Host the Virtual Symposium “The Other Slavery” Sept. 24–27. “Stories of enslaved Indigenous peoples have often been absent from the historical narrative. From Sept. 24–27, the Smithsonian will host the virtual symposium ‘The Other Slavery: Histories of Indian Bondage from New Spain to the Southwestern United States,’ which will explore the hidden stories of enslaved Indigenous peoples, focusing on the legacy of Spanish colonization in the Americas and Asia and its impact on what is now the southwestern United States. This program seeks to give a comprehensive first voice to these hushed stories and living legacies.”

Associated Press: Missouri cave with ancient Native American drawings sold

Associated Press: Missouri cave with ancient Native American drawings sold. “Bryan Laughlin, director of Selkirk Auctioneers & Appraisers, the St. Louis-based firm handling the auction, said the winning bidder declined to be named. A St. Louis family that’s owned the land since 1953 has mainly used it for hunting. The cave was the site of sacred rituals and burying of the dead. It also has more than 290 prehistoric glyphs, or hieroglyphic symbols used to represent sounds or meanings, ‘making it the largest collection of indigenous people’s polychrome paintings in Missouri,’ according to the auction website.”

Green Bay Press-Gazette: Ron Corn Jr. is one of fewer than 20 fluent speakers of the Menominee language. He’s working to change that.

Green Bay Press-Gazette: Ron Corn Jr. is one of fewer than 20 fluent speakers of the Menominee language. He’s working to change that.. “The Menominee Nation offers language instruction through its education system, including an immersion program in which small children are fully immersed in the language. But grassroots programs, such as Menomini yoU, allow for tribal citizens, or anyone else not attending Menominee schools, to learn from home any time.Their website… informs users that they can learn at their own pace, whether 10 minutes or four hours a day and whether it’s in the morning, afternoon or evening.”

Opinion: For Navajo, crowded homes have always been a lifeline. The pandemic threatens that. (Washington Post)

Washington Post: Opinion: For Navajo, crowded homes have always been a lifeline. The pandemic threatens that.. “Kay Atene’s family lives together on the same red earth in Oljato-Monument Valley in Utah that her great-grandparents returned to after surviving the ‘Long Walk’ more than 150 years ago. Generations living together is central to how the Navajo have navigated crises for centuries. But the coronavirus has put that in jeopardy: Crowded homes have become one of the deadliest places to be during the pandemic.”

Los Angeles Times: Despite obstacles, Native Americans have the nation’s highest COVID-19 vaccination rate

Los Angeles Times: Despite obstacles, Native Americans have the nation’s highest COVID-19 vaccination rate. “It’s not just the Fort Belknap reservation that has managed to protect itself. Experts say Native Americans have a higher vaccination rate than any other major racial or ethnic group. Those rates are difficult to determine, because many vaccine recipients do not provide their race or ethnicity when they get shots. But more than 100 million have done so. That data — collected by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — suggest that Native Americans are 24% more likely than whites to be fully vaccinated, 31% more likely than Latinos, 64% more likely than African Americans and 11% more likely than Asian Americans.”

Wall Street Journal: At Schools Where Native American Children Died, New Hope for Answers

Wall Street Journal: At Schools Where Native American Children Died, New Hope for Answers. “Sifting through archived records, the volunteer group has compiled 67 names, but with little funding for more research, they have no way of knowing how many of the children are buried in Chilocco’s cemetery, which bears only a single marked grave. Theirs is one of numerous efforts by tribal historians and researchers over the past several years to uncover evidence of Native Americans who died at the boarding schools. Until now, these grass roots investigations have been stymied by limited resources and logistical hurdles. Now, those leading the projects are hoping a new federal investigation can shed light on a mystery that has haunted Indian Country for generations.”