CNBC: Navajo Nation reports no new daily Covid cases, deaths for the first time in six months

CNBC: Navajo Nation reports no new daily Covid cases, deaths for the first time in six months. “The Navajo Nation, which inhabits the largest area of land retained by an indigenous tribe in the United States, reported Monday that it had zero new coronavirus cases and deaths in the previous 24 hours after rolling out an aggressive vaccination campaign. The tribe, whose land stretches across Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, had the highest per capita infection rate in the U.S. at the height of the pandemic.”

Mississippi Department of Archives & History: MDAH Completes Largest Repatriation of Native American Ancestors in State History

Mississippi Department of Archives & History: MDAH Completes Largest Repatriation of Native American Ancestors in State History. “The Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH) has transferred the remains of 403 Native Americans and eighty-three lots of burial objects to the Chickasaw Nation. This is the largest return of human remains in Mississippi history, and the first for MDAH.”

BuzzFeed News: A Native American Tribe In Oklahoma Denied Black Citizens COVID-19 Vaccines And Financial Relief

BuzzFeed News: A Native American Tribe In Oklahoma Denied Black Citizens COVID-19 Vaccines And Financial Relief. “By the time the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma began distributing vaccines to tribal citizens, LeEtta Osborne-Sampson had already witnessed nearly two dozen members of her extended family die of COVID-19. She was relieved vaccine doses had finally arrived to protect those who remained. But when she showed up at the Indian Health Service clinic in Wewoka, the capital of the Seminole Nation, staffers refused to give her a shot. They told her that she wasn’t eligible because her tribal ID card identifies her as a Freedman, a Seminole citizen who is a descendant of enslaved Black people.”

Macleod Gazette: Project creates digital home for Blackfoot items

Macleod Gazette: Project creates digital home for Blackfoot items. “Mootookakio’ssin, at its simplest description, is a project to create detailed images of historical Blackfoot objects housed in British museums. At its most complex, it is creating a virtual home for Indigenous objects, a place to reactivate the Blackfoot relations within them and transfer that knowledge all the way from Britain back to their peoples in southern Alberta. After two years of research, construction and creation, this collaborative project between University of Lethbridge and UK researchers, led by Blackfoot advisors and elders, is coming to fruition, culminating in presentations, exhibitions, workshops, and the launch of the digital object microsite in summer 2021, to be housed in the Blackfoot Digital Library.”

KULR: Blackfeet woman creates international travel website and app to share history, resources, information

KULR: Blackfeet woman creates international travel website and app to share history, resources, information. “A Blackfeet woman has started a non-profit organization to gather and share information, resources, and history of the tribe with travelers across Montana and Canada. The project promotes interaction and contribution from the public. Souta Calling Last collects centuries worth of information through storytelling, factual data, and social trends to help tribal members and tourists better understand the area where they live or explore.”

Emory University: U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo to give free Emory University reading online

Emory University: U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo to give free Emory University reading online. “Current U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, the first Native American to hold the position, will read her poems at an event hosted by the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library on Saturday, March 20, at 4 p.m. Although this is normally a large, annual, in-person event — part of the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library Reading Series — Harjo’s program will be online due to ongoing COVID-19 restrictions.” The event is free but registration is required.

DigitalNC: Fill-In Batch of The Carolina Indian Voice Now Online

DigitalNC: Fill-In Batch of The Carolina Indian Voice Now Online. “DigitalNC is happy to announce a new batch of digitized newspaper issues from The Carolina Indian Voice. This round of issues includes most of 1976, all of 1977, and fill-ins for the years 1979-1996. These additions have brought us that much closer to a complete online collection of The Voice. We would like to thank our partners at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for providing the physical issues that made this possible.”

New Yorker: The Rural Alaskan Towns Leading the Country in Vaccine Distribution

New Yorker: The Rural Alaskan Towns Leading the Country in Vaccine Distribution. “In Sitka, the small Alaskan town where I live, fifteen hundred people—out of a total population of eight thousand—have already received second doses. We’re on track to complete vaccinations this spring. In many rural towns throughout the state, it is the tribal health organizations, not the state government, that are in charge of vaccine distribution.”

Mother Jones: COVID-19 Has Killed 1 in 475 Native Americans

Mother Jones: COVID-19 Has Killed 1 in 475 Native Americans. “Nationwide one in every 475 Native Americans has died from Covid since the start of the pandemic, compared with one in every 825 white Americans and one in every 645 Black Americans. Native Americans have suffered 211 deaths per 100,000 people, compared with 121 white Americans per 100,000.”

Daily Star: Fenimore museum places collections online

Daily Star: Fenimore museum places collections online. “Fenimore Art Museum has announced the launch of a digital database showcasing the museum’s collections of fine art, folk art and The Thaw Collection of American Indian Art. The site ‘dramatically improves online access and representation of the Museum’s holdings consisting of more than 2,000 objects and works of art,’ presenters said in a media release.”

Nature: How to include Indigenous researchers and their knowledge

Nature: How to include Indigenous researchers and their knowledge. “Although racial-justice initiatives around the world have sparked a renewed focus on the need to recruit and retain more people from minority ethnic groups in STEM, Indigenous researchers — and Indigenous knowledge — remain at risk of being overlooked. Nature spoke to four Indigenous academic scientists about the challenges these early-career researchers face, and how scientists can respectfully and effectively bring together traditional knowledge and Western science.”

ABC News: Washington, Oregon, 29 tribes sue over plan to move archives

ABC News: Washington, Oregon, 29 tribes sue over plan to move archives. “Washington, Oregon, more than two dozen Native American and Alaska Native tribes and cultural groups from the Northwest are suing the federal government to stop the sale of the National Archives building in Seattle, a plan that would force the relocation of millions of invaluable historical records to California and Missouri.”

Muskogee Phoenix: Muscogee (Creek) Nation National Library and Archives receives grant

Muskogee Phoenix: Muscogee (Creek) Nation National Library and Archives receives grant. “The project will include 40 oral history interviews from Muscogee citizens and community members concerning their experiences with the COVID-19 pandemic. The grant will also aid in the purchase of oral history recording equipment and supplies, the creation of a digital archive and Oral History Research Station, located in the MCN National Library and Archives, and the creation of a library website.”