Alaska Native News: Museum Leads Effort to Preserve Alutiiq Family Photos

Alaska Native News: Museum Leads Effort to Preserve Alutiiq Family Photos. “To assist Alutiiq families with the preservation of their paper photographs the Alutiiq Museum is leading a Community Photo Archive project. In the coming months, museum staff members will work with tribal councils and community members to identify Alutiiq family photos, scan the images, and create digital copies to their owners. Staff members will invite families to deposit digital copies with the museum, but sharing is not a requirement for participation. This one-year effort is funded by the US Bureau of Indian Affairs with assistance from the Sun’aq Tribe of Kodiak.”

NPR: How A Graphic Novel Resurrected A Forgotten Chapter In American History

NPR: How A Graphic Novel Resurrected A Forgotten Chapter In American History. “Ghost River: The Fall and Rise of the Conestoga, a new graphic novel and art exhibit, depicts a gruesome, footnoted event in American history — the Conestoga Massacre. The massacre was an act of brutality that killed an entire community of Native people and almost erased their voices from history. Ghost River hopes to give that voice back, reenvisioning the events through the eyes of Native people. (The comic is available to read online. A free exhibit featuring art from the book is running at the Library Company of Philadelphia until April.)”

Expert: It would take hundreds of years to digitize records at Seattle National Archives (MyNorthwest)

MyNorthwest: Expert: It would take hundreds of years to digitize records at Seattle National Archives. “When officials from the Washington, D.C. office of the National Archives and Records Administration met with a handful of tribal representatives at the National Archives in Seattle earlier this month, one solution that was offered was digitization. That is, since access to the materials now stored in Seattle will be more difficult once those materials are moved to a NARA facility in California roughly four years from now, D.C. officials suggested that scanning the priceless photos, maps, and documents before they’re moved could help minimize any difficulties created by the surprise closure. Very little of what’s stored in Seattle has been digitized — perhaps far, far less than even one percent, according to some estimates.”

NiemanLab: Report for America will support 19 journalists to cover Native American communities

NiemanLab: Report for America will support 19 journalists to cover Native American communities. “It’s hard to say that Native Americans have, historically, gotten the kind of journalism they deserve. Mainstream news outlets typically pay them little attention, and when they do, indigenous people are more often the subject of reporting than its target audience. Less than one half of one percent of journalists at U.S. news organizations are Native, compared to 1.7 percent of the national population. And that’s not even to mention how Native Americans are portrayed in the limited coverage they do see.”

Crosscut: Closing Seattle’s National Archives is a ‘paper genocide’ for some Natives

Crosscut: Closing Seattle’s National Archives is a ‘paper genocide’ for some Natives. “In displacing Native peoples, identities have been imprinted, often very imperfectly, on the documents here. David Z. Bean, chairman of the Puyallup Tribe, described in a letter objecting to the closure of the archives that they contain not only original treaties and drafts from the mid-19th century, but original correspondence with Indian agents and records ‘associated with litigation that document the Tribe’s effort to protect our treaty rights and territory.’ Moving them, he wrote, would have a ‘profound, negative and irreparable impact.’ Tribes, it should be noted, were not systematically consulted in advance of the decision to close the archives and sell off the property.”

MyNorthwest: National Archives tries ‘re-set’ with tribes about Seattle closure

MyNorthwest: National Archives tries ‘re-set’ with tribes about Seattle closure. “Officials from the Washington, D.C, offices of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA) are in Seattle this week, quietly meeting with staff of the threatened Seattle facility and with representatives of Puget Sound area Native American tribes. The meetings have not been publicized, but multiple sources alerted KIRO Radio that they were taking place.”

Spotlight on Collections: Expanding Both What We Know and What’s Available Online (Smithsonian)

Smithsonian: Spotlight on Collections: Expanding Both What We Know and What’s Available Online. “The National Museum of the American Indian has taken a major step toward making our collections more widely available: We have posted all of the museum’s ethnographic and contemporary art collections to the Smithsonian’s online collections search center. Last week, records for some 38,000 objects and sets of objects were available on the search site. Now, more than 122,000 records are available.”