National Archives News: New Finding Aid Improves Search for Native American Photos

National Archives News: New Finding Aid Improves Search for Native American Photos. “It is now easier than ever to search through more than 18,000 digitized photos from the Bureau of Indian Affairs, thanks to a new finding aid from the National Archives and Records Administration. Released on November 19, 2020, the finding aid presents more than a century of archived photographs of Native American communities from the National Archives Catalog in a researcher-friendly format, searchable by Tribal Nation, topic, or state.”

Wall Street Journal: Covid Upends a Rural Hospital, Where Staff Know All the Patients

Wall Street Journal: Covid Upends a Rural Hospital, Where Staff Know All the Patients. “The Crow reservation, home to about 7,200 people in southern Montana, has been struck by one of the nation’s worst outbreaks in recent weeks. That has created a situation at this 24-bed hospital, operated by the U.S. Indian Health Service, unlike almost any other medical facility in the country: The people helping combat the disease know many of the sick.”

Billings Gazette: New Crow language app launches

Billings Gazette: New Crow language app launches . “For years, organizers have been collecting a massive database of Crow words, comparing nuance about their meanings and translations, and seeking out as many speakers of the language as possible — all with the goal of creating a new way for people to learn the language. It’s ready. A new Crow language app launched in mid-November, offering convenient access to a wealth of knowledge. ”

CNN: Covid-19 is sending Black, Latino and Native American people to the hospital at about 4 times the rate of others

CNN: Covid-19 is sending Black, Latino and Native American people to the hospital at about 4 times the rate of others. “Black, Hispanic and Native American people infected with Covid-19 are about four times more likely to be hospitalized than others, data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows.”

NET Nebraska: Digital Archive Catalogues Abuses Of Genoa Indian School

NET Nebraska: Digital Archive Catalogues Abuses Of Genoa Indian School. “From its opening in 1884 until its decommissioning in 1934, the Genoa Indian School in Genoa, Nebraska harbored Native American children with the goal of destroying native culture through assimilation. Now, there’s a digital project that seeks to document the experiences of those who attended for future generations.”

KSL NewsRadio: Navajo eligible to apply for CARES Act pandemic assistance

KSL NewsRadio: Navajo eligible to apply for CARES Act pandemic assistance. “Enrolled members of the Navajo Nation can now apply for federal CARES Act funding through a new website. The COVID-19 pandemic hit the Navajo Nation particularly hard, resulting in strict lockdowns and resource donations to fight the spread.”

University of Arkansas Little Rock: UA Little Rock’s Sequoyah National Research Center creates website visualizing American Indian removal through Arkansas

University of Arkansas Little Rock: UA Little Rock’s Sequoyah National Research Center creates website visualizing American Indian removal through Arkansas. “The center has completed a two-year research project, ‘Journey of Survival: Indian Removal Through Arkansas,’ that includes a website and interactive touchscreen table that visually maps the journey of American Indians who journeyed through Arkansas after the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The project was funded by a grant from the Arkansas Natural and Cultural Resources Council.”

WBUR: Online Exhibit At Harvard’s Peabody Museum Elevates Wampanoag Voices

WBUR: Online Exhibit At Harvard’s Peabody Museum Elevates Wampanoag Voices. “‘Listening to Wampanoag Voices: Beyond 1620’ features artists, storytellers and researchers, discussing some of their cultural items and photographs that are housed in the museum’s collection. “Early on, we decided to blur the focus on the 17th century,” says Meredith Vasta, collections steward at the Peabody. ‘We wanted to look at more contemporary lives and perspectives of Wampanoag people.'”

KOAT: COVID-19 vaccine trials at Navajo Nation ‘overwhelmingly positive’

KOAT: COVID-19 vaccine trials at Navajo Nation ‘overwhelmingly positive’. “As COVID-19 vaccine trials around the world are put on hold because of safety concerns, the trials happening at the Navajo Nation are seeing great success. The nation became one of the first groups in the country to begin vaccine trials. Currently the medical team at the John Hopkins Center for American Indian Health, said that since the trials began in September at least 40 people have signed up to participate in the trials.”

The Alcatraz Logbook: Signs of Red Power (Autry Museum of the American West)

Autry Museum of the American West: The Alcatraz Logbook: Signs of Red Power . “On November 20, 1969, a group of Native Americans landed and occupied Alcatraz Island for 19 months. The initial group of over eighty occupiers referred to themselves as ‘Indians of All Tribes’ reflecting the diversity of Native Americans in the Bay Area during this time period…Much of the history of the occupation and its key players have been recorded elsewhere, but one key element of the story has been missing. A logbook of those who visited the island exists and is presented here to the public for the first time.”

New York Times: Pandemic Highlights Deep-Rooted Problems in Indian Health Service

New York Times: Pandemic Highlights Deep-Rooted Problems in Indian Health Service. “Few hospital beds, lack of equipment, a shipment of body bags in response to a request for coronavirus tests: The agency providing health care to tribal communities struggled to meet the challenge.”

Smithsonian Magazine: A Native American Community in Baltimore Reclaims Its History

Smithsonian Magazine: A Native American Community in Baltimore Reclaims Its History. “Baltimore may be famous for John Waters, Edgar Allan Poe, and steamed crabs, but very few people are aware that there was once a sizeable population of American Indians, the Lumbee tribe, who lived in the neighborhoods of Upper Fells Point and Washington Hill. By the 1960s, there were so many Native Americans living in the area that many Lumbee affectionately referred to it as ‘The Reservation.’ In the early 1970s, this part of Baltimore underwent a massive urban renewal development project and many Lumbee residences were destroyed, including most of the 1700 block of East Baltimore Street.”

ProPublica: The Federal Government Promised Native American Students Computers and Internet. Many Are Still Waiting.

ProPublica: The Federal Government Promised Native American Students Computers and Internet. Many Are Still Waiting.. “Computer shortages have raised nationwide concerns about educational inequities, which are amplified in tribal communities that resisted the Bureau of Indian Education’s desire for in-person instruction in an effort to control rising cases of COVID-19. The inability to attend classes in person, coupled with the bureau’s delay in distributing emergency CARES Act funding, forced some students attending the federally-operated schools to start the new year the same way the last one ended, working on paper packets from home while getting little instruction from their teachers.”

New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs: MIAC Presents Virtual Event for New Online Treaties Explorer Resource

New Mexico Department of Cultural Affairs: MIAC Presents Virtual Event for New Online Treaties Explorer Resource. “The Museum of Indian Arts & Culture (MIAC), in partnership with the U.S. National Archives Office of Innovation, is pleased to announce an online launch event of the Indigenous Digital Archive’s Treaties Explorer, also known as ‘DigiTreaties.’ Thanks to an anonymous donor, the U.S. National Archives has been able to conserve and make the first-ever scans of its holdings of 374 Ratified Indian Treaties.”

Montana State University: MSU Extension, Montana Legal Services announce do-it-yourself Will-in-a-Box for tribal communities

Montana State University: MSU Extension, Montana Legal Services announce do-it-yourself Will-in-a-Box for tribal communities. “A new online program featured on the Montana State University Extension website aims to provide free help for Native Americans looking to write an Indian will. The program, called Will-in-a-Box, is the result of a partnership between the Montana Legal Services Association and the Indian Land Tenure Foundation. It is featured on Extension’s website on planning for the passing reservation lands to future generations, which explains major sections of the American Indian Probate Reform Act.”