Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford

Hartford Courant: A new project reveals the hidden history of colonial people of color who are buried in downtown Hartford. “The graves of hundreds of African Americans and Native Americans lie in downtown Hartford’s Ancient Burying Ground, but without headstones they remain invisible. Excluded from official records or referred to only by race, their stories remain as hidden as their graves. Four centuries after enslaved people were first brought to America, a new project organized by the Ancient Burying Ground Association investigates hundreds of these untold stories. ‘Uncovering Their History’ shares the stories of colonists of color: an enslaved couple given away as a wedding present, black men who joined the Continental Navy in hopes of obtaining their freedom, Native American doctors and servants.”

VT: Police hunt Instagram couple who vandalised 8,000-year-old Native American site

VT: Police hunt Instagram couple who vandalised 8,000-year-old Native American site. “Police are currently hunting for a pair of Instagrammers who allegedly vandalised an ancient, 8000-year Native American site. The sacred ground, which is called the Council Overhang, is a waterfall in the middle of the woodland Starved Rock State Park in the state of Illinois.”

NPR: Historic Recordings Revitalize Language For Passamaquoddy Tribal Members

NPR: Historic Recordings Revitalize Language For Passamaquoddy Tribal Members. “Dwayne Tomah sits at his kitchen table in Perry, Maine, and pulls up an audio file on his computer. When he hits play, the speakers emit a cracked, slightly garbled recording. Through the white noise, Tomah scratches out the words he hears, rewinding every few seconds. Word by word, Tomah is attempting to transcribe and interpret dozens of recordings of Passamaquoddy tribal members, some of which are only recently being heard and publicly shared for the first time in more than a century.”

Tahlequah Daily Press: Natives encouraged to sign up for film database

Tahlequah Daily Press: Natives encouraged to sign up for film database. “The next big star could be discovered this weekend during the 67th Annual Cherokee National Holiday, as the Cherokee Nation Film Office is signing up actors to be included in a Native American talent and crew database for filmmakers. Jennifer Loren, CNFO senior Manager, said the agency constantly hears about Hollywood casting non-Native people for Native American roles, so they’ve devised a way to bring Natives to Hollywood.”

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian Launches New Online Materials Based on Accurate and Comprehensive Native Peoples History

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian Launches New Online Materials Based on Accurate and Comprehensive Native Peoples History. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian is looking to change the narrative about American Indians in classrooms, transforming how teachers are teaching history to achieve a more inclusive, accurate and complete education. As part of its national education initiative, Native Knowledge 360 Degrees (NK360°), the National Museum of the American Indian has launched new online educational resources about the Pawnee Treaties, the Cherokee Nation Removal and the Inka Empire that will expand teachers and students’ knowledge and understanding of the contributions and experiences of Native Peoples of the Western Hemisphere.”

Confluence: New Digital Library Brings Indigenous Voices into the Classroom

Confluence: New Digital Library Brings Indigenous Voices into the Classroom. “A new digital resource library will give Oregon and Washington students access to Indigenous stories and perspectives to support lessons on the history, cultures and ecology of the Columbia River system. The Confluence Library is a collection of documentary shorts, interview excerpts, photo galleries and research papers that help educators teach a more inclusive understanding of our region.’

KUOW: ‘Our women are no longer invisible.’ Counting missing and murdered indigenous women from the Northwest

KUOW: ‘Our women are no longer invisible.’ Counting missing and murdered indigenous women from the Northwest. “Seattle’s Native community wants better data on missing and murdered indigenous women, and they’re taking it on themselves to make that happen. The Urban Indian Health Institute, the research arm of the Seattle Indian Health Board, is holding events where people can enter information about missing loved ones into the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System (NamUs), a federal database.”