Poynter: Governments created an informational black hole for Indigenous communities and COVID-19

Poynter: Governments created an informational black hole for Indigenous communities and COVID-19. “We may never know how many American Indians or Alaska Natives died of COVID-19. The Indian Health Service, a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, is not keeping track. The Centers for Disease Control cannot tell us. And some state health authorities will not disclose that data, despite multiple public records requests, even though it would shed light on the pandemic’s death toll in Indian Country.”

Announcement | Stolen Relations: Recovering Stories of Indigenous Enslavement in the Americas (Brown University Library News)

Brown University Library News: Announcement | Stolen Relations: Recovering Stories of Indigenous Enslavement in the Americas. “The Library has been contributing to a community-centered database project led by Professor Linford Fisher that seeks to document the many instances of Indigenous enslavement in the Americas between 1492 through 1900. Formerly entitled, Database of Indigenous Slavery Archive (DISA), the project is now named, Stolen Relations: Recovering Stories of Indigenous Enslavement in the Americas.”

Department of the Interior: Secretary Haaland Announces Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative

Department of the Interior: Secretary Haaland Announces Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative. “The Federal Indian Boarding School Initiative will serve as an investigation about the loss of human life and the lasting consequences of residential Indian boarding schools. The primary goal will be to identify boarding school facilities and sites; the location of known and possible student burial sites located at or near school facilities; and the identities and Tribal affiliations of children interred at such locations.”

NPR: The 400 Years Project Looks At Native American Identity Through The Native Lens

Launched late last year and new-to-me, from NPR: The 400 Years Project Looks At Native American Identity Through The Native Lens . “‘The Mayflower and its aftermath has become the first and most culturally iconic story told to many young Americans about the country’s founding and initial relationships with Native people,’ says photographer Sarah Stacke. ‘But the stories they’re told of a golden age of friendship, new beginnings, and untouched wilderness, is a myth.’ Correcting those myths and looking at the evolution of Native American identity over the last 400 years is the mission of The 400 Years Project, a pictorial collection of Native American life. It includes original photo essays, text essays and a digital library of Native photographers from the mid-1800s to the present.”

KNBA: Museums, Native heritage organizations look to future of digital collection, repatriation

KNBA: Museums, Native heritage organizations look to future of digital collection, repatriation. “The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act certainly has its flaws. But museums and Native cultural organizations look to the future of digital collections and repatriation. The Alutiiq Museum, which is based in Kodiak, will begin to digitize its collection with the eventual goal of expanding and digitizing collections from other museums.”

KHQ: New database and portal aims to ‘streamline’ reports of missing indigenous people

KHQ: New database and portal aims to ‘streamline’ reports of missing indigenous people. “The Blackfeet Community College unveiled a new portal that will help people report cases of Montana’s missing and murdered indigenous people…. People can submit a missing persons report, which will get sent to local law enforcement agencies. The coalition will make sure that agencies got it, and will keep in touch with the person who submitted it. They’ll also post the report on social media pages.”

CBC: Instagram apology for MMIWG posts that disappeared is inadequate, advocate says

CBC: Instagram apology for MMIWG posts that disappeared is inadequate, advocate says. “Instagram issued an apology Thursday night after posts about missing and murdered Indigenous women and girls (MMIWG) disappeared on a day meant to raise awareness of the issue, but advocates say it doesn’t go far enough to address the harm that was done. ‘I really don’t think that Instagram has adequately addressed that feeling of silencing and erasure,’ said Emily Henderson, an Inuk arts and culture writer based out of Toronto.”

CNBC: Navajo Nation reports no new daily Covid cases, deaths for the first time in six months

CNBC: Navajo Nation reports no new daily Covid cases, deaths for the first time in six months. “The Navajo Nation, which inhabits the largest area of land retained by an indigenous tribe in the United States, reported Monday that it had zero new coronavirus cases and deaths in the previous 24 hours after rolling out an aggressive vaccination campaign. The tribe, whose land stretches across Utah, Arizona and New Mexico, had the highest per capita infection rate in the U.S. at the height of the pandemic.”

Mississippi Department of Archives & History: MDAH Completes Largest Repatriation of Native American Ancestors in State History

Mississippi Department of Archives & History: MDAH Completes Largest Repatriation of Native American Ancestors in State History. “The Mississippi Department of Archives and History (MDAH) has transferred the remains of 403 Native Americans and eighty-three lots of burial objects to the Chickasaw Nation. This is the largest return of human remains in Mississippi history, and the first for MDAH.”

BuzzFeed News: A Native American Tribe In Oklahoma Denied Black Citizens COVID-19 Vaccines And Financial Relief

BuzzFeed News: A Native American Tribe In Oklahoma Denied Black Citizens COVID-19 Vaccines And Financial Relief. “By the time the Seminole Nation of Oklahoma began distributing vaccines to tribal citizens, LeEtta Osborne-Sampson had already witnessed nearly two dozen members of her extended family die of COVID-19. She was relieved vaccine doses had finally arrived to protect those who remained. But when she showed up at the Indian Health Service clinic in Wewoka, the capital of the Seminole Nation, staffers refused to give her a shot. They told her that she wasn’t eligible because her tribal ID card identifies her as a Freedman, a Seminole citizen who is a descendant of enslaved Black people.”

Macleod Gazette: Project creates digital home for Blackfoot items

Macleod Gazette: Project creates digital home for Blackfoot items. “Mootookakio’ssin, at its simplest description, is a project to create detailed images of historical Blackfoot objects housed in British museums. At its most complex, it is creating a virtual home for Indigenous objects, a place to reactivate the Blackfoot relations within them and transfer that knowledge all the way from Britain back to their peoples in southern Alberta. After two years of research, construction and creation, this collaborative project between University of Lethbridge and UK researchers, led by Blackfoot advisors and elders, is coming to fruition, culminating in presentations, exhibitions, workshops, and the launch of the digital object microsite in summer 2021, to be housed in the Blackfoot Digital Library.”

KULR: Blackfeet woman creates international travel website and app to share history, resources, information

KULR: Blackfeet woman creates international travel website and app to share history, resources, information. “A Blackfeet woman has started a non-profit organization to gather and share information, resources, and history of the tribe with travelers across Montana and Canada. The project promotes interaction and contribution from the public. Souta Calling Last collects centuries worth of information through storytelling, factual data, and social trends to help tribal members and tourists better understand the area where they live or explore.”

Emory University: U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo to give free Emory University reading online

Emory University: U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo to give free Emory University reading online. “Current U.S. Poet Laureate Joy Harjo, the first Native American to hold the position, will read her poems at an event hosted by the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library on Saturday, March 20, at 4 p.m. Although this is normally a large, annual, in-person event — part of the Raymond Danowski Poetry Library Reading Series — Harjo’s program will be online due to ongoing COVID-19 restrictions.” The event is free but registration is required.

DigitalNC: Fill-In Batch of The Carolina Indian Voice Now Online

DigitalNC: Fill-In Batch of The Carolina Indian Voice Now Online. “DigitalNC is happy to announce a new batch of digitized newspaper issues from The Carolina Indian Voice. This round of issues includes most of 1976, all of 1977, and fill-ins for the years 1979-1996. These additions have brought us that much closer to a complete online collection of The Voice. We would like to thank our partners at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for providing the physical issues that made this possible.”

New Yorker: The Rural Alaskan Towns Leading the Country in Vaccine Distribution

New Yorker: The Rural Alaskan Towns Leading the Country in Vaccine Distribution. “In Sitka, the small Alaskan town where I live, fifteen hundred people—out of a total population of eight thousand—have already received second doses. We’re on track to complete vaccinations this spring. In many rural towns throughout the state, it is the tribal health organizations, not the state government, that are in charge of vaccine distribution.”