WAAY: Alabama archives to return Native American remains, burial objects

WAAY: Alabama archives to return Native American remains, burial objects. “The remains of Native American people who once lived in Alabama were dug up a century ago — often by amateur archeologists — and given to the state along with the jewelry, urns and other objects buried with them.”

University of Melbourne: How Data Expertise Is Fostering Endangered Languages

University of Melbourne: How Data Expertise Is Fostering Endangered Languages. “The PARADISEC digital archive model revitalising endangered languages around the Pacific has now been taken up in North America by the Cherokee Nation.”

Associated Press: Wounded Knee artifacts highlight slow pace of repatriations

Associated Press: Wounded Knee artifacts highlight slow pace of repatriations. “Some 870,000 Native American artifacts — including nearly 110,000 human remains — that should be returned to tribes under federal law are still in the possession of colleges, museums and other institutions across the country, according to an Associated Press review of data maintained by the National Park Service.”

EIN Presswire: Ho-Chunk Nation Releases Milestone Indigenous Language Digital Dictionary

EIN Presswire: Ho-Chunk Nation Releases Milestone Indigenous Language Digital Dictionary (PRESS RELEASE). “On July 30, 2022, Ho-Chunk Nation is proudly releasing their dictionary at the General Council in Madison, Wisconsin…. The new Hoocąk Wazijaci dictionary is freely available online and via mobile download. It includes nearly 12,000 entries and over 9,000 example sentences.”

Albuquerque Journal: New database lists missing Native Americans from New Mexico, Navajo Nation

Albuquerque Journal: New database lists missing Native Americans from New Mexico, Navajo Nation. “The FBI on Monday unveiled a new database listing the names of 177 missing Native Americans from New Mexico and throughout the Navajo Nation, as part of the Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Relatives initiative, Raul Bujanda, special agent in charge of the Albuquerque FBI Division, said at a news conference.”

University of Maryland: Who Owns the Sounds and Images of Native People’s Pasts?

University of Maryland: Who Owns the Sounds and Images of Native People’s Pasts?. “The last known fluent speaker of the tribe’s native Western dialect died in 2010, and the remaining tribal citizens–who traditionally don’t count their members but are estimated to number about 350 speak an amalgam of Ahtna’s Western and Central dialects. Audio recordings of Western Ahtna exist, but many are kept in mainstream archives that don’t belong to the Chickaloon tribe. Now, two University of Maryland faculty members are part of a new effort to bring those recordings, and other pieces of history, back to the Native people who lived the stories within them.”

The Harvard Crimson: Harvard Holds Human Remains of 19 Likely Enslaved Individuals, Thousands of Native Americans, Draft Report Says

The Harvard Crimson: Harvard Holds Human Remains of 19 Likely Enslaved Individuals, Thousands of Native Americans, Draft Report Says. “Harvard University holds the human remains of at least 19 individuals who were likely enslaved and almost 7,000 Native Americans — collections that represent ‘the University’s engagement and complicity’ with slavery and colonialism, according to a draft University report obtained by The Crimson.”

US Department of Education: Funding Available to Support Native Language Revitalization

US Department of Education: Funding Available to Support Native Language Revitalization. “Advancing its commitment to maintaining, protecting, and revitalizing Native American languages – the U.S. Department of Education has announced approximately $1 million in grant funding available for Native American Language (NAL@ED) projects.”

NBC News: Lakota elders helped a white man preserve their language. Then he tried to sell it back to them.

NBC News: Lakota elders helped a white man preserve their language. Then he tried to sell it back to them.. “The Lakota Language Consortium had promised to preserve the tribe’s native language and had spent years gathering recordings of elders, including Taken Alive’s grandmother, to create a new, standardized Lakota dictionary and textbooks. But when [Ray] Taken Alive, 35, asked for copies, he was shocked to learn that the consortium, run by a white man, had copyrighted the language materials, which were based on generations of Lakota tradition.”

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian To Launch “Ancestors Know Who We Are” June 15

Smithsonian: National Museum of the American Indian To Launch “Ancestors Know Who We Are” June 15. “The Smithsonian’s National Museum of the American Indian will launch the digital exhibition ‘Ancestors Know Who We Are’ June 15. The exhibition features works by six contemporary Black-Indigenous women artists that address issues of race, gender, multiracial identity and intergenerational knowledge.”

University of Wisconsin-Madison: 3D scan will reveal the stories hidden within 1,200-year-old Wisconsin canoe

University of Wisconsin-Madison: 3D scan will reveal the stories hidden within 1,200-year-old Wisconsin canoe. “[Lennon] Rodgers — who directs the Grainger Engineering Design and Innovation Laboratory at the University of Wisconsin–Madison — was there to help archaeologists better understand a 1,200-year-old, 15-foot dugout canoe recovered in 2021 from the waters of Lake Mendota, the largest of Madison’s four lakes and part of the ancestral home of the Ho-Chunk Nation. At the invitation of Wisconsin State Archaeologist James Skibo and Scott Roller, senior collections manager for the Wisconsin Historical Society, Rodgers scanned the canoe and created detailed 3D renderings that will preserve the boat’s legacy and allow researchers to study the craft while it undergoes a multiyear preservation process.”

Raven Radio: Southeast Native Radio aired for just 16 years, but its voices will live on in a new digital archive

Raven Radio: Southeast Native Radio aired for just 16 years, but its voices will live on in a new digital archive . “Southeast Native Radio was broadcast over KTOO in Juneau for 16 years, from 1985 to 2001. The volunteer-produced show played as current affairs at the time, but twenty-one years later it’s become a window into the lives of the people and events that shaped Native culture in the region over the last century.”

US Department of Commerce: Biden Administration Awards Nearly $77 Million to Expand Internet Access for Dozens of Tribes

US Department of Commerce: Biden Administration Awards Nearly $77 Million to Expand Internet Access for Dozens of Tribes. “The grants, totaling nearly $77 million, are being awarded in 10 states – Alaska, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Louisiana, Michigan, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Dakota, and Washington. They will fund internet use and adoption projects to improve healthcare, workforce development, education, housing, and social services in tribal communities.”

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art

Daily Beast: 3D Tech Is Helping Archaeologists Unearth Ancient Indigenous Art. “What is known is that these caves are regarded as sacred places by Native Americans in the American Southeast—considered pathways to the underworld. This is why researchers theorize that the anthropomorphic figures may have been spiritually important. These massive figures are also described in the study as ‘invisible.’ The cave is so cramped, and etchings so faint, that the artwork was overlooked when researchers entered the chamber more than 20 years ago. To solve this, the study team used a technique known as high-resolution 3D photogrammetry to digitally manipulate the chamber space and reveal the artwork.”

Los Angeles Times: UC to pay full tuition for Native American students from federally recognized tribes

Los Angeles Times: UC to pay full tuition for Native American students from federally recognized tribes. “Many Native American students will receive free tuition at the University of California starting in the fall semester. In a letter sent to UC chancellors, President Michael V. Drake said that tuition will be covered for all California residents from federally recognized Native American, American Indian and Alaska Native tribes through existing state and university financial aid programs. Scholarships for residents from the state’s non-federally recognized tribes may be available through other organizations.”