KTVA: Anchorage Museum archiving memes, social media posts from earthquake

KTVA: Anchorage Museum archiving memes, social media posts from earthquake. “The 1964 earthquake was documented in newspaper headlines, letters and photographs shot on film. After the Nov. 30 quake, historians are using words and images from social media to document the disaster. Aaron Leggett, a curator with the Anchorage Museum, said staff started collecting online items for their archive an hour after the quake hit.”

Engadget: ‘Aftermath’ is a 360-degree walkthrough of the Camp Fire devastation

Engadget: ‘Aftermath’ is a 360-degree walkthrough of the Camp Fire devastation. “Camp Fire, the tragedy that killed at least 85 victims and destroyed around 14,000 homes across Paradise, California, continues to torment as residents start returning to the ruin as of yesterday. News channels around the world have been offering a sober look at what little is left behind the walls of fire, but not long after disaster struck, former Lytro exec Steve Cooper already sensed the need to capture a proper first-hand account of this unprecedented catastrophic event.”

Motherboard: YouTube Lets California Fire Conspiracy Theories Run Wild

Motherboard: YouTube Lets California Fire Conspiracy Theories Run Wild. “The Camp Fire in California has killed at least 79 people, left 699 people unaccounted for, and created more than a thousand migrants in Butte County, California. In these circumstances, reliable information can literally be a matter of life death. But on YouTube, conspiracy theories are thriving.”

BuzzFeed News: Instagram Influencers Are Using The California Wildfires To Sell Products And Post Nudes

BuzzFeed News: Instagram Influencers Are Using The California Wildfires To Sell Products And Post Nudes. “[Jeremy] Kost, an artist who posts drag and nude photos, is one of many Instagram influencers and businesses who’ve been sharing Instagram posts using the location, hashtag, or keywords associated with the fires for personal or promotional content. The result is that anyone searching for hashtags related to the fires will encounter meditation shots, sales pitches, nudes, and a bevy of attractive photos of influencers alongside posts showing the depth of the devastation.”

California fires: how we’re providing aid and ways you can help (Google Blog)

Google Blog: California fires: how we’re providing aid and ways you can help. “Over the last week, three wildfires have devastated communities in California, and there’s been a tremendous effort—on the part of firefighters, first responders, local officials and NGOs—to contain the flames and help thousands of displaced families. Since the start of the fires, we’ve deployed resources to help those affected in our own backyard. Here’s a bit more on that, and how you can help.”

Quartzy: The Cruelty And Kindness Of Social Media In The Midst Of A Disaster

Quartzy: The Cruelty And Kindness Of Social Media In The Midst Of A Disaster. “There was a time, long before social media was blamed for many of the world’s biggest problems, that digital communities were posited as the utopian replacement to the small-mindedness of staying close to home, close to what we know. Of course, that didn’t turn out so well. We know now that compassion, empathy, and community can’t be provided by a large tech company with a clear profit motive for winning our attention. In times of disaster as well as in times of normalcy, that part is up to us.”

Larry Ferlazzo: Resources On Terrible Camp Fire Near Here & How To Help Victims

Larry Ferlazzo: Resources On Terrible Camp Fire Near Here & How To Help Victims. “Our area of Northern California is becoming the site of regular and terrible wildfires. Last year it was tragic fire in Santa Rosa, where I had lived for over ten years, and which is an hour away from us (see The Best Resources For Teaching & Learning About The Santa Rosa Fires (& How To Help Victims)). This weekend it’s the horrible Camp Fire – again, a hour away from us.” Quick annotated list.