USA Today: Flood-prone homeowners could see major rate hikes in FEMA flood insurance changes, new study finds

USA Today: Flood-prone homeowners could see major rate hikes in FEMA flood insurance changes, new study finds. “The First Street Foundation calculated ZIP code-level averages of the financial toll of flood damage by collecting home values and structural information for every single-family and small multi-unit dwelling in the nation and applying it to its previously published flood model with damage formulas. First Street calculated its figures for about 26,000 ZIP codes in the lower 48 states and D.C. ZIP codes without data are not included.”

The Texas Tribune: How to help and get help in Texas as the winter storm causes power outages

The Texas Tribune: How to help and get help in Texas as the winter storm causes power outages. “Millions of Texans are without power, heat and essential services during a winter storm that has led to freezing temperatures and hazardous road conditions throughout the state. City officials, local outreach teams and other organizations are providing warming shelters and support for people seeking help. Many nonprofit organizations are also asking for donations so they can help people experiencing homelessness or those who are in need of support. Here’s a list of the resources being offered in cities across the state.”

WWF: Google’s AI technology to identify animals impacted by bushfires

WWF: Google’s AI technology to identify animals impacted by bushfires. “Artificial intelligence and an army of new sensor cameras will be used to track the recovery of animals impacted by bushfires in one of the most extensive post-fire surveillanceprograms ever undertaken in Australia. WWF-Australia and Conservation International, supported with a USD 1 million grant from Google’s philanthropic arm Google.org, have launched An Eye on Recovery, a large-scale collaborative camera sensor project.”

Turning up the volume on early humanitarian action: ‘one-stop-shop’ Anticipation Hub goes live (Climate Centre)

Climate Centre: Turning up the volume on early humanitarian action: ‘one-stop-shop’ Anticipation Hub goes live. “The new Anticipation Hub was created by the German Red Cross, the IFRC and the Climate Centre with funding support from the German Federal Foreign Office and was launched today as part of the online 8th Global Dialogue Platform on Anticipatory Humanitarian Action. It is designed as a one-stop-shop for knowledge, learning and guidance on anticipatory action, and already has more than 60 partners across the Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement, governments, universities, research institutes, NGOs, UN agencies, and other networks.”

FEMA Releases National Risk Index: New Online Data Shows Natural Hazards Risks for Communities (FEMA)

FEMA: FEMA Releases National Risk Index: New Online Data Shows Natural Hazards Risks for Communities. “FEMA announced the Phase 1 rollout of the National Risk Index, a new online resource that helps illustrate communities most at risk from natural hazards. This online mapping application analyzes risk factors from 18 natural hazards. Additionally, to provide a holistic view of community risk, the application includes expected annual losses, social vulnerability and community resilience layers.”

Texas Advanced Computing Center: Disaster Database Is Go-To Hub For Natural Hazard Information

New-to-me, from Texas Advanced Computing Center: Disaster Database Is Go-To Hub For Natural Hazard Information. “The Seattle mega-quake scenario is one of hundreds of data sets published on DesignSafe, a database for natural disaster information created by researchers at The University of Texas at Austin that has changed how planners, builders, policymakers and engineers prepare for and respond to hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes and more. The data repository gives researchers the ability to formally publish data sets related to natural disaster studies in the same way research papers are published in journals, giving them an accessible digital home.”

The Press of Atlantic City: NJ Coastal Coalition creates photo archive of coastal flooding hot spots

The Press of Atlantic City: NJ Coastal Coalition creates photo archive of coastal flooding hot spots. “There was no coastal flooding that day, making the hardest part walking along the side of the Black Horse Pike, cars whizzing by, keeping composure for a few seconds as Dan Skeldon and Palma Accardi, of the New Jersey Coastal Coalition, smiled and waved for the camera. The goal? To inform homeowners and visitors that, for more than 90% of the year, the shore is an easygoing, great place to be. The rest can present challenges in the form of coastal flooding.”

Michigan State University: Emergency Response Archive of Puerto Rico Receives Mellon Foundation Grant

Michigan State University: Emergency Response Archive of Puerto Rico Receives Mellon Foundation Grant. “The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation has awarded Michigan State University a $325,000 grant to support the first phase of the ‘Emergency Response Archive of Puerto Rico,’ a digital open-access repository of Puerto Rican artifacts of disasters pertaining to Hurricane María (2017), the Guayanilla earthquakes (2020), and COVID-19 (2020).”

Fast Company: This new tool pinpoints the communities most in need of disaster relief

Fast Company: This new tool pinpoints the communities most in need of disaster relief. “A partnership between GiveDirectly and Google.org aims to smooth the process of delivering funds to the people who require them most urgently. The charity, the largest in the world that assists via direct cash transfers only, and the tech giant have launched Delphi, an online tool that allows aid organizations to pinpoint the specific locations, down to granular zip-code level, most in need of assistance. The data-driven effort creates scores based on the overlap between two metrics—poverty level and destruction of property—then ranks and shows those neighborhoods visually in Google Maps.”

Flood risks: More accurate data due to COVID-19 (Phys .org)

Phys .org: Flood risks: More accurate data due to COVID-19. “A number of countries went into politically decreed late hibernation at the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. Many of those affected by the lockdown suffered negative economic and social consequences. Geodesy, a branch of Earth science to study Earth’s gravity field and its shape, on the other hand, has benefited from the drastic reduction in human activity. At least that is what the study now published in Geophysical Research Letters shows. The study, which was carried out by geodesists from the University of Bonn, investigated the location of a precise GNSS antenna in Boston (Massachusetts) as an example.”