Phys .org: Brazilian communities fight floods together – with memories and an app

Phys .org: Brazilian communities fight floods together – with memories and an app. “Brazilian communities that are vulnerable to devastating floods are being united and empowered to defend themselves, using ‘citizen science’ and a specially developed mobile app, thanks to two research projects led by the University of Warwick.”

Asahi Shimbun: Tottori to provide flood estimates using Google Street View

Asahi Shimbun: Tottori to provide flood estimates using Google Street View. “The Street View feature on Google Maps enables users to see landscapes and scenery on the maps. Under the prefecture’s system using special software, residents can experience flooding in a more realistic fashion and become more aware of the need to plan anti-disaster measures, the officials said. Essentially, they will be able to pick evacuation routes in a more simplified way than using the current hazard maps.”

Phys .org: Wikipedia, a source of information on natural disasters biased towards rich countries

Phys .org: Wikipedia, a source of information on natural disasters biased towards rich countries. “As a source of information related to natural disasters, the authors show that on Wikipedia, there is a greater tendency to cover events in wealthy countries than in poor countries. By performing careful, large-scale analysis of automatic content, ‘we show how flood coverage in Wikipedia leans towards wealthy, English-speaking countries, particularly the USA and Canada,’ they claim in their work. ‘We also note that the coverage of flooding in low-income countries and in countries in South America, is substantially less than the coverage of flooding in middle-income countries,’ they add.”

Phys .org: Citizen scientists get snappy to monitor bushfire-ravaged environment

Phys .org: Citizen scientists get snappy to monitor bushfire-ravaged environment. “UNSW Sydney researchers are urging citizen scientists to use their mobile phones for a good cause: to monitor the recovery of bushfire-affected plants and animals for the Environment Recovery Project which will inform future research.”

9News Australia: World-first 3D map shows smoke plumes from Australian bushfires as captured from space

9News Australia: World-first 3D map shows smoke plumes from Australian bushfires as captured from space. “In a world-first, an interactive map depicting the height of smoke plumes from bushfires during the peak of Australia’s bushfire crisis has been released. It is hoped that the new tool will improve the Bureau of Meteorology’s ability to predict where potentially dangerous smoke haze will move, as well as provide crucial ‘big picture’ information to disaster management agencies.”

Google News Pilipinas: University of the Philippines opens portal on Taal Volcano data, 1st in Asia to offer public access

Good News Pilipinas: University of the Philippines opens portal on Taal Volcano data, 1st in Asia to offer public access. “The Taal Volcano LiDAR datasets were derived through the use of airborne systems mounted on an airplane. The output of the LiDAR sensor is a 3D point cloud containing points that were scanned. The LiDAR technology was able to generate maps with resolution of up to 1×1 meter which can be used for planning and reconstruction of areas damaged by the Taal Volcano eruption in Batangas on January 12, 2020. The Taal Volcano mapping is free and downloadable by anyone with internet access and by most modern GIS software.”

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: New online database to give homebuyers detailed information about flood risks

St. Louis Post-Dispatch: New online database to give homebuyers detailed information about flood risks. “First Street Foundation on Tuesday launched Flood Lab, a research partnership which provides eight universities with its model that maps previous instances of flooding as well as future risks. Using the dataset, Wharton, MIT and John Hopkins University among others will quantify the impacts of flooding on the U.S. economy….The data will be made available to the public in the first half of 2020 in an online database searchable by home address.”