University of Vermont: In Disasters, Twitter Influencers Get Out-Tweeted

University of Vermont: In Disasters, Twitter Influencers Get Out-Tweeted. “When it comes to sharing emergency information during natural disasters, new University of Vermont research shows how timing is everything. The new study on Twitter use during hurricanes, floods and tornadoes offers potentially life-saving data about how information is disseminated in emergency situations, and by whom. The research is the first to look at social media patterns across different disaster types, focusing on five of the decade’s costliest U.S. emergencies.”

Sacramento Bee: Camp Fire survivors have moved as far as Hawaii and Virginia. See where they live now

Sacramento Bee: Camp Fire survivors have moved as far as Hawaii and Virginia. See where they live now. “A website and public Facebook group have recently been set up by Camp Fire survivors to tell their stories firsthand. The site… appears to have been established in the first few days of February. It includes a section for survivors to write and submit stories about their experience during California’s deadliest-ever wildfire, and for the community and world at large to read those stories.”

Washington State DNR: DNR Publishes Inventory of King County Landslides

Washington State DNR: DNR Publishes Inventory of King County Landslides. “The Washington Geological Survey, a division of the Washington State Department of Natural Resources, published a new inventory of known landslides in the western two-thirds of King County today. The Geological Survey inventoried 2,838 landslides throughout King County using new lidar data, raising awareness of a relatively common geologic hazard.”

Q&A: Creating a “Virtual Seismologist” (Caltech)

Caltech: Q&A: Creating a “Virtual Seismologist” . “A promising new collaboration between Caltech seismologists and computer scientists using artificial intelligence (AI)—computer systems capable of learning and performing tasks that previously required humans—aims to improve the automated processes that identify earthquake waves and assess the strength, speed, and direction of shaking in real time. The collaboration includes researchers from the divisions of Geological and Planetary Sciences and Engineering and Applied Science, and is part of Caltech’s AI4Science Initiative to apply AI to the big-data problems faced by scientists throughout the Institute.”

Deep data: Oregon offers new online resource for potential flooding around the state (Register-Guard)

Register-Guard: Deep data: Oregon offers new online resource for potential flooding around the state. “Riverside property owners, anglers and others with interest in stream levels around Oregon have a new way to check for potential flooding. The Oregon Office of Emergency Management last month released a new online dashboard. The tool includes an interactive map and a list of how many stream gauges are expected to be nearing flood stage, or have minor flooding, moderate flooding or major flooding. As of early this week, no gauges around Oregon indicated flooding.”

The Indian Express: Google now ready to give public ‘flood alerts’

The Indian Express: Google now ready to give public ‘flood alerts’. “Tech giant Google is scaling up its learnings from a pilot project in Patna to provide flood alerts in simple text format to people in many parts of the country using sophisticated machine learning techniques. The Union Ministry of Water Resources provides Google with data on river water levels for preparing such public alerts.”

The Daily Universe: Fake news, propaganda spread quickly on social media

The Daily Universe: Fake news, propaganda spread quickly on social media. “As the Eagle Mountain and Pole Creek wildfires raged across Utah Valley in September, BYU YDigital Lab Managing Director Adam Durfee saw another destructive force raging across local news and social media: misinformation. ‘A very popular, trustworthy Utah news outlet published a story about the fires that was blatantly inaccurate,’ Durfee said. ‘And then a second story misrepresented the amount of fire containment, which gave people a very scary amount of security they shouldn’t have had.'”