Lincoln County News: Digital History Launched on Nation’s First Audubon Camp

Lincoln County News: Digital History Launched on Nation’s First Audubon Camp. “Friends of Hog Island has announced the launch of a digital history about the Hog Island Audubon Camp in Bremen. Since its founding in 1936 as a hands-on conservation camp for teachers, the Audubon Camp in Maine has instilled a love of nature and commitment to community and conservation in the more than 50,000 campers who have arrived on Hog Island. Sixteen months ago, Friends of Hog Island’s board unanimously approved a partnership with digital history pioneer, HistoryIT, to digitally preserve the historical documents, photos, videos, and film of the Hog Island Audubon Camp.”

Savannah Business Journal: DNR launches updated Georgia Birding & Wildlife Trails website

Savannah Business Journal: DNR launches updated Georgia Birding & Wildlife Trails website. “The Georgia Birding and Wildlife Trails website introduces each trail site with access tips, a map, a list of amenities, wildlife highlights and a link to eBird hotspots. Wildlife viewing resources include a printable species checklist with seasonality data, as well as information on birding basics, Georgia Audubon chapters, citizen science projects, bird curricula and conservation organizations. A new program logo showcases the great blue heron, a familiar species found throughout the state.”

BBC: Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2020 finalists revealed

BBC: Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards 2020 finalists revealed. “A fish that appears to smile, a bear giving a friendly wave from afar and a very grumpy sea turtle – this year’s finalists show animals in relatable comedy moments. The Comedy Wildlife Photography Awards were founded by Paul Joynson-Hicks and Tom Sullam, both professional photographers and passionate conservationists.”

Earth Institute, Columbia University: What Social Media Can Teach Us About Human-Environment Relationships

Earth Institute, Columbia University: What Social Media Can Teach Us About Human-Environment Relationships. “Recent ecological research used Instagram posts to analyze the preferences of visitors to natural areas around the world. Researchers deduced the activities and feelings that people associated with different environments, including Glacier Bay National Park and Preserve. The study explores the potential of using social media data to understand cultural ecosystem services—the intangible benefits that people receive from nature—and interactions between people and their environments.”

EurekAlert: New smartphone game lets you solve real-world ecological puzzles

EurekAlert: New smartphone game lets you solve real-world ecological puzzles. “EcoBuilder lets players build their own ecosystem of plants and animals. They throw together a bunch of species of different shapes and sizes, decide who eats who within the confines of the game, and depending on their decisions species will either survive or go extinct. The in-game processes that decide extinction and survival are modelled using the same equations used by scientists to study real world ecosystems. This means that natural phenomena can be reproduced inside the game, creating ecosystems that behave in realistic ways to provide real-world answers.”

PLOS Blogs: Introducing the Biodiversity Conservation Collection

PLOS Blogs: Introducing the Biodiversity Conservation Collection. “It is with great pleasure that we announce the launch of our Biodiversity Conservation Collection. This Collection showcases research on a broad range of conservation science related topics, including anthropogenic impacts on biodiversity, such as habitat degradation, the spread of invasive species and global warming; conservation of key ecosystem services, such as carbon sequestration and pest regulation; and new management strategies to prevent further biodiversity loss.”

PsyPost: Analysis of 31,500 social media photos finds a connection between nature and happiness

PsyPost: Analysis of 31,500 social media photos finds a connection between nature and happiness. “The researchers used artificial intelligence to gather 31,534 photographs from 185 countries that had been uploaded to the website Flickr and automatically detect their content. They found that photographs tagged as #fun, #vacations and #honeymoons were more likely to contain elements of nature such as plants, water and natural landscape compared to photographs tagged #daily or #routines.”

Phys .org: Leopards spotted in Pakistan capital’s park as virus clears way

Phys .org: Leopards spotted in Pakistan capital’s park as virus clears way. “Leopards, jackals and other creatures living in Islamabad’s tree-covered hills have been enjoying a rare respite from the throngs of hikers and joggers that normally pack the trails. Rangers in the Pakistani capital’s Margalla Hills National Park saw animal activity increase soon after the city was locked down in March to counter the coronavirus.”

Coronavirus lockdown: Can nature help improve our mood? (BBC)

BBC: Coronavirus lockdown: Can nature help improve our mood?. “While the impact of experiencing nature on our physical health is less well documented, a wealth of studies have demonstrated the positive effects of the natural world on our mental health. Even a brief nature fix – 10 minutes of wind brushing across our cheek, or the sun on our skin – can lower stress, explains Dr Mathew White, from the University of Exeter. If we immerse ourselves in beautiful landscapes, like a rich coastline or a wild forest teeming with an array of species, we feel more intense emotions, he adds.”

BGR: These nature live streams will lift your spirits during lockdown

Thanks to Esther S. for this pointer. BGR: These nature live streams will lift your spirits during lockdown. “Being stuck inside is a bummer. Being stuck inside because there’s a global pandemic and coming within six feet of someone else could make things even worse? Well, that’s even more of a bummer. If you’re self-isolating in a rural area or small town it might be easy to get a bit of nature every day, but millions of people cooped up in big cities don’t really have that option. As someone who works from home anyway, virus or no virus, I’ve found that being stuck inside doesn’t necessarily mean you have to abandon your love of the great outdoors. Let me introduce you to the world of live nature cams.”

Tufts Now: Teaching Kids About Nature to Save the Planet

Tufts Now: Teaching Kids About Nature to Save the Planet. “The class explores programs and methods that connect children and teens to the natural world in ways that support their development as stewards of the Earth—from forest schools, wilderness programs,environmental education, and urban gardening programs to reading programs using nature-friendly children’s books and teen protests that have captured the attention of the world. The class has also proved a catalyst for a new online venture to share that information with the wider world. Tomorrow’s Earth Stewards, an online publication, includes articles on programs and methods being used around the world to support children’s and youth’s development as earth stewards.”

Mashable: The northern lights cam just turned on and it’s the perfect season for ghostly skies

Mashable: The northern lights cam just turned on and it’s the perfect season for ghostly skies. “The same live webcam site that brings you Alaska’s glorious, salmon-hungry fat bears just turned on its webcam in the northern reaches of Churchill, Canada. This town, famous for the polar bears who regularly stroll down its streets, is ideally situated to watch the glowing, emerald northern lights, aka the Aurora borealis.”

Google Blog: 1,000 of the most stunning landscapes in Google Earth

Google Blog: 1,000 of the most stunning landscapes in Google Earth. “Earth View is a collection of thousands of the planet’s most beautiful landscapes, seen from space…. Today, we’re making our biggest update to Earth View by adding more than 1,000 new images to the collection, bringing the total to more than 2,500 striking landscapes.”

ELLE: Fashion Responds To Climate Change With Digitized Versions Of Nature

ELLE: Fashion Responds To Climate Change With Digitized Versions Of Nature. “Florals for spring are not, as has been established, groundbreaking. But Huji-filtered superblooms on a dress? That’s far less expected. The term uncanny valley was coined by robotics scientist Masahiro Mori to describe the revulsion humans feel toward robots as they come to appear more and more lifelike. (Think of our collective fascination—and discomfort—with ‘realistic’ simulations like the CGI model/influencer Lil Miquela.) This wariness has tended to apply more to representations of humans than of nature, but as pristine wilderness becomes rarer and more threatened, these heightened representations of it feel more uncanny.”