Mashable: The northern lights cam just turned on and it’s the perfect season for ghostly skies

Mashable: The northern lights cam just turned on and it’s the perfect season for ghostly skies. “The same live webcam site that brings you Alaska’s glorious, salmon-hungry fat bears just turned on its webcam in the northern reaches of Churchill, Canada. This town, famous for the polar bears who regularly stroll down its streets, is ideally situated to watch the glowing, emerald northern lights, aka the Aurora borealis.”

Google Blog: 1,000 of the most stunning landscapes in Google Earth

Google Blog: 1,000 of the most stunning landscapes in Google Earth. “Earth View is a collection of thousands of the planet’s most beautiful landscapes, seen from space…. Today, we’re making our biggest update to Earth View by adding more than 1,000 new images to the collection, bringing the total to more than 2,500 striking landscapes.”

ELLE: Fashion Responds To Climate Change With Digitized Versions Of Nature

ELLE: Fashion Responds To Climate Change With Digitized Versions Of Nature. “Florals for spring are not, as has been established, groundbreaking. But Huji-filtered superblooms on a dress? That’s far less expected. The term uncanny valley was coined by robotics scientist Masahiro Mori to describe the revulsion humans feel toward robots as they come to appear more and more lifelike. (Think of our collective fascination—and discomfort—with ‘realistic’ simulations like the CGI model/influencer Lil Miquela.) This wariness has tended to apply more to representations of humans than of nature, but as pristine wilderness becomes rarer and more threatened, these heightened representations of it feel more uncanny.”

Phys .org: New tool visualizes nature’s benefits worldwide

Phys .org: New tool visualizes nature’s benefits worldwide. “Nature supports people in critical ways, often at a highly local level. Wild bees buzz through farms, pollinating vegetables as they go. Nearby, wetlands might remove chemicals from the farm’s runoff, protecting a community drinking water source. In communities all around the world, nature’s contributions are constantly flowing to people. Scientists have mapped these contributions at local levels for years, but a new Stanford-led study puts these local analyses on an interactive global map that emphasizes nature’s declining ability to protect people from water pollution, coastal storms and under-pollinated crops.”

BBC: Nature’s language is being hijacked by technology

BBC: Nature’s language is being hijacked by technology. “‘Apple’, ‘tweet’, ‘cloud’, ‘stream’ – words that once conjured vivid visions of the countryside are now synonymous with our technological world. And, a National Trust study suggests, just 1% of uses of the word ‘tweet’ in conversation now refer to birdsong. Similarly, while in the 1990s 100% of mentions of ‘stream’ meant ‘a little river’, that has now fallen to 36%.”

Stuff: Social media monitoring important part of DoC rangers job to control crowds lured by Instagram posts

Stuff: Social media monitoring important part of DoC rangers job to control crowds lured by Instagram posts. “Conservation watchdogs are tuning into social media to help mitigate unprecedented tourist demand at our so called secret hotspots. When a scenic hotspot goes viral on social media, it can bring tourists, jobs and money. It can also bring crowds, litter and crime.”

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: New Carnegie Museum app shows threat to wildflower diversity in the woods

Pittsburgh Post-Gazette: New Carnegie Museum app shows threat to wildflower diversity in the woods. “Hikers and hunters have already seen changes in the woodlands of Appalachia in recent years, as deer overpopulation literally nibbles away at the many plant species that live under the trees. A collaboration of science and new media experts has introduced a new tool for the Carnegie Museum of Natural History to educate people about the state of nature and inspire them as well. The tool is an app for smartphones and tablets, called AR Perpetual Garden, that gives even armchair nature lovers a way to compare two scenarios: the woodlands blooming with native wildflowers and the same scene stripped of botanical diversity because of too many deer.”