Arolsen Archives: Ten million more names published

Arolsen Archives: Ten million more names published. “In the winter of 1945/46, the four occupying powers issued orders to German local authorities, companies, the police, and other institutions requiring them to draw up lists of the foreign nationals, German Jews and stateless persons who were registered with them. Details of burial sites were to be included. A large collection of the documents created in this way as well as other lists from the American Zone of Occupation can now be viewed in the online archive of the Arolsen Archives. They contain information pertaining to around ten million names.”

Live Science: Remains of Nazi ‘Flying Bombs’ Uncovered in British Woods

Live Science: Remains of Nazi ‘Flying Bombs’ Uncovered in British Woods. “Project leader Colin Welch told Live Science that almost 10,000 V1 flying bombs were fired mainly from launching ramps in German-controlled Holland against the southeast of England in 1944 and 1945…. Welch and his brother now hope to create an online museum of their v-weapon excavations, which would include 3D models of the recovered artifacts and historical information about the wartime V1 and V2 campaigns.”

Dallas News: Holocaust Museum project debunks myth that Americans weren’t aware of the plight of Jews in Nazi Germany

Dallas News: Holocaust Museum project debunks myth that Americans weren’t aware of the plight of Jews in Nazi Germany. “Two years ago, in preparation for the exhibition, the museum launched a crowd-sourcing project, ‘History Unfolded.’ Museum staff asked students, teachers, librarians and history buffs across the country to research their local newspapers and determine what kind of information their communities could have read or heard about Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. With the help of hundreds of students and dedicated volunteers, the museum built an extensive online archive of American newspaper coverage of key Holocaust events, including more than 12,000 articles from every U.S. state. Each submission is important historical evidence.”

The Local (SE): Swedish university launches digital archive of Nazi concentration camp survivor testimonies

The Local (SE): Swedish university launches digital archive of Nazi concentration camp survivor testimonies. “A digital archive of over 500 survivors’ testimonies from a Nazi concentration camp will be launched in the southern Swedish city of Lund later this week. The archive includes interviews with women and children who were interned at the RavensbrĂĽck camp in northern Germany, as well as documents belonging to survivors and Nazi officials. “

Jewish Journal: Art, history converge in Grunwald archive

Jewish Journal: Art, history converge in Grunwald archive. “The archive, one of several digital initiatives to be funded with the help of a $500,000 grant from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, includes in-depth essays about [Fred] Grunwald, official documents and some 1,500 images from his collection at UCLA. Many of the images are of 19th and 20th century French, German and American prints, as well as Japanese woodblock prints.”