Media Matters: Facebook finally removed Trump campaign ads with inverted red triangle — an infamous Nazi symbol

Media Matters: Facebook finally removed Trump campaign ads with inverted red triangle — an infamous Nazi symbol. “Since June 3, the Trump campaign has been running Facebook ads fearmongering about ‘antifa.’ On June 17, the campaign added an inverted red triangle to some variations of the ad — a symbol the Nazis used to designate political prisoners.”

The Art Newspaper: German court rules in favour of Nazi-looted art database, although owners say a listing makes works unsellable

The Art Newspaper: German court rules in favour of Nazi-looted art database, although owners say a listing makes works unsellable. “A German court has ruled that the current possessor of a work of art cannot stop a claimant from registering it on a government database of Nazi-looted art in the latest in a series of legal challenges to listings on lostart.de, a German website designed to help victims and their heirs recover cultural property lost due to Nazi persecution.”

Yale Daily News: Nazi archive managers plan collab

Yale Daily News: Nazi archive managers plan collab. “Staff from the Fortunoff Video Archive for Holocaust Testimonies at Yale — a collection of 4,400 video testimonies of Nazi persecution witnesses — joined with those from the Arolsen Archives — the largest paper collection of Nazi persecution victims, which is housed in Bad Arolsen, Germany. The two groups are looking to create a data service that brings the two libraries together. They said they hope to create a virtual interactive lab that adds to records found in the Arolsen Archives.”

Content Moderation At Scale Is Impossible: YouTube Says That Frank Capra’s US Government WWII Propaganda Violates Community Guidelines (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Content Moderation At Scale Is Impossible: YouTube Says That Frank Capra’s US Government WWII Propaganda Violates Community Guidelines. “The film, which gives a US government-approved history of the lead up to World War II includes a bunch of footage of Adolf Hitler and the Nazis. Obviously, it wasn’t done to glorify them. The idea is literally the opposite. However, as you may recall, last summer when everyone was getting mad (again) at YouTube for hosting ‘Nazi’ content, YouTube updated its policies to ban ‘videos that promote or glorify Nazi ideology.’ We already covered how this was shutting down accounts of history professors. And, now, it’s apparently leading them to take US propaganda offline as well.”

BBC: Twitter apologises for letting ads target neo-Nazis and bigots

BBC: Twitter apologises for letting ads target neo-Nazis and bigots. “Twitter has apologised for allowing adverts to be micro-targeted at certain users such as neo-Nazis, homophobes and other hate groups. The BBC discovered the issue and that prompted the tech firm to act.”

Arolsen Archives: Ten million more names published

Arolsen Archives: Ten million more names published. “In the winter of 1945/46, the four occupying powers issued orders to German local authorities, companies, the police, and other institutions requiring them to draw up lists of the foreign nationals, German Jews and stateless persons who were registered with them. Details of burial sites were to be included. A large collection of the documents created in this way as well as other lists from the American Zone of Occupation can now be viewed in the online archive of the Arolsen Archives. They contain information pertaining to around ten million names.”

Fstoppers: Rare and Unseen Photos of Hitler and Nazi Rallies Released, Digitized From Glass Negatives

Fstoppers: Rare and Unseen Photos of Hitler and Nazi Rallies Released, Digitized From Glass Negatives. “The National Archive has digitized, restored, and released 1,270 photos of Adolf Hitler, originally taken by his personal photographer, Henrich Hoffmann. Most have never been seen before, and range from studio portraits to Nazi rallies. Created from a trove of 41,000 glass negatives, many of which were broken and had to be reassembled, the process has been overseen Richard E. Schneider. The project took around nine months to complete.” The images are apparently not online yet, but are expected to be soon.

BuzzFeed News: WhatsApp Has Become A Hotbed For Spreading Nazi Propaganda In Germany

BuzzFeed News: WhatsApp Has Become A Hotbed For Spreading Nazi Propaganda In Germany. “German WhatsApp users are spreading far-right propaganda through the use of stickers and chain letters, and the company is doing little to nothing to stop it, despite local laws forbidding the use of Nazi imagery.”

Los Angeles Times: Facebook decided which users are interested in Nazis — and let advertisers target them directly

Los Angeles Times: Facebook decided which users are interested in Nazis — and let advertisers target them directly. “Facebook makes money by charging advertisers to reach just the right audience for their message — even when that audience is made up of people interested in the perpetrators of the Holocaust or explicitly neo-Nazi music. Despite promises of greater oversight following past advertising scandals, a Times review shows that Facebook has continued to allow advertisers to target hundreds of thousands of users the social media firm believes are curious about topics such as ‘Joseph Goebbels,’ ‘Josef Mengele,’ ‘Heinrich Himmler,’ the neo-nazi punk band Skrewdriver and Benito Mussolini’s long-defunct National Fascist Party.”

The Local Denmark: Thousands download newly-published list of Danish WW2 Nazis

Newish, definitely, New-to-me, from The Local Denmark: Thousands download newly-published list of Danish WW2 Nazis. “A list detailing of members of the Danish Nazi party, DNSAP, during the Second World War, has been downloaded thousands of times since its online release. The Danish Genealogy Association (Danske Slægtsforskere) earlier this year chose to make available for download a list known as the Bovrup Index, which gives the names of Danish Nazis from before and during the Second World War.”

Live Science: Remains of Nazi ‘Flying Bombs’ Uncovered in British Woods

Live Science: Remains of Nazi ‘Flying Bombs’ Uncovered in British Woods. “Project leader Colin Welch told Live Science that almost 10,000 V1 flying bombs were fired mainly from launching ramps in German-controlled Holland against the southeast of England in 1944 and 1945…. Welch and his brother now hope to create an online museum of their v-weapon excavations, which would include 3D models of the recovered artifacts and historical information about the wartime V1 and V2 campaigns.”

Update: Faces of Auschwitz website is now live (Boing Boing)

Boing Boing: Update: Faces of Auschwitz website is now live. “A while back, I wrote about Faces of Auschwitz: a website dedicated to telling the stories of the prisoners of the Auschwitz concentration camp…. For the past few months, we’ve been hard at work preparing content for the site while the good people at WordPress built us a fabulous online home. This past week, it all came together. The Faces of Auschwitz website is now live.”

Daily Sabah: New database on Nazi-looted art findings shows first results

Daily Sabah: New database on Nazi-looted art findings shows first results. “Art lovers will now be able to learn about one of the largest cases of Nazi-looted art in history after a team of researchers on Wednesday launched a website with their findings about the art collection of legendary German-Jewish publisher Rudolf Mosse….German institutions are working with the descendents of former Nazi victims through the project. The Mosse collection – with its thousands of paintings, sculptures, objects, books and antiquities – is one of the largest cases of Nazi-looted art.”

Dallas News: Holocaust Museum project debunks myth that Americans weren’t aware of the plight of Jews in Nazi Germany

Dallas News: Holocaust Museum project debunks myth that Americans weren’t aware of the plight of Jews in Nazi Germany. “Two years ago, in preparation for the exhibition, the museum launched a crowd-sourcing project, ‘History Unfolded.’ Museum staff asked students, teachers, librarians and history buffs across the country to research their local newspapers and determine what kind of information their communities could have read or heard about Nazi Germany and the Holocaust. With the help of hundreds of students and dedicated volunteers, the museum built an extensive online archive of American newspaper coverage of key Holocaust events, including more than 12,000 articles from every U.S. state. Each submission is important historical evidence.”