University of Maryland: College Park Community Of Lakeland To Get New Digital Archive

University of Maryland: College Park Community Of Lakeland To Get New Digital Archive. “A National Endowment for the Humanities grant will enhance the ability of Lakeland residents to manage their cultural heritage. In the late 19th century, a small African American community named Lakeland took root just beyond the grounds of what was then called the Maryland Agricultural College, now the University of Maryland. Lakeland thrived for decades, even in the face of historical forces like segregation, suburbanization, school desegregation and urban renewal, which plagued African American towns and cities across the nation throughout the 20th century.”

Engadget: Toronto rejects some of Sidewalk Labs’ smart neighborhood ideas

Engadget: Toronto rejects some of Sidewalk Labs’ smart neighborhood ideas. “Sidewalk Labs will have to cede a little more ground on its vision for Quayside, a planned smart neighborhood in Toronto. The company, which is owned by Google-parent Alphabet, published a draft version of its Master Innovation and Development Plan (MIDP) last June.”

The Architect’s Newspaper: Sidewalk Labs is using machine learning to make neighborhood design smoother

The Architect’s Newspaper: Sidewalk Labs is using machine learning to make neighborhood design smoother. “Sidewalk Labs, the Alphabet subsidiary focused on urban technology, has been working on a new software tool for generating optimized city layouts. In an effort to combat the disconnect between various stakeholders in the urban planning process—architects, planners, engineers, and real estate developers—and their software, product manager Violet Whitney and designer Brian Ho have created a new computational tool that analyzes a wide array of data to automatically create thousands, or millions, of neighborhood layouts from a baseline design.”

Tennessee State Library and Archives: Mapping the Destruction of Tennessee’s African American Neighborhoods

Tennessee State Library and Archives: Mapping the Destruction of Tennessee’s African American Neighborhoods. (This link leads to a Facebook post.) “The ‘Mapping the Destruction of Tennessee’s African American Neighborhoods’ story map project details the often destructive impact of urban renewal and interstate projects of the mid-20th century on Tennessee’s African American communities. The project combines GIS software and primary sources to create an interactive exhibit whereby users can visualize the direct effects of these public works projects in cities across Tennessee.”

National Institute on Aging: The Neighborhood Atlas—Free Social Determinants of Health Data for All!

National Institute on Aging: The Neighborhood Atlas—Free Social Determinants of Health Data for All!. “Developed by Amy Kind, M.D., Ph.D., and her team at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, the Neighborhood Atlas2 is a user-friendly, online tool that enables customized ranking and mapping of neighborhoods according to socioeconomic disadvantage across the full U.S., including Puerto Rico. Anyone can use the Neighborhood Atlas, not just researchers: If you can use a smartphone mapping app, you can use the Atlas — no fancy degree required!”

‘Took away our identity’: Google Maps puzzles residents with new neighbourhood names (Reuters)

Reuters: ‘Took away our identity’: Google Maps puzzles residents with new neighbourhood names. “Home to a Peach Street, an Orange Street and a Lemon Street, the Fruit Belt district of Buffalo, New York, has been known by that name since German settlers planted orchards there in the 1800s. So, local resident Veronica Hemphill-Nichols was surprised when she opened Google Maps on her first, freshly bought smartphone about 10 years ago and saw the area rebranded as Medical Park.”

Curbed NY: See Greenwich Village’s historic buildings in one handy map

Curbed NY: See Greenwich Village’s historic buildings in one handy map. “The map shows the 2,200 buildings located within the district as they looked back in 1969, and has over 1,000 entries with information on those landmarks. The map is divided in 17 sections, including Transformative Women; Artists’ Homes; Social Change Champions; Course of History Changed; Great Writers; and Edward Hopper’s Greenwich Village.”