Northeastern: New research shows that, post net neutrality, internet providers are slowing down your streaming

Northeastern: New research shows that, post net neutrality, internet providers are slowing down your streaming. “New net neutrality rules, born in 2015 and struck down two years later, were conceived to protect consumers’ ability to access all online information equally. During this short lifespan, [Dave] Choffnes and two Northeastern students developed an app that could track violations of net neutrality. Apple originally blocked the app, now called Wehe, from its App Store. But after ensuing media coverage caused a sharp increase in the number of Wehe users, Choffnes found himself with a wealth of data.”

American Library Association: ALA files amicus brief in support of net neutrality protections

American Library Association: ALA files amicus brief in support of net neutrality protections. “The American Library Association today argued in support of the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) strong, enforceable rules to protect and preserve the open internet with an amici filing with the U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Los Angles Times: Net neutrality activists and state officials are taking FCC to court. Here’s how they’ll argue the case

Los Angeles Times: Net neutrality activists and state officials are taking FCC to court. Here’s how they’ll argue the case. “Opponents of the Federal Communications Commission have outlined their chief arguments on net neutrality to a federal appeals court in Washington, in hopes of undoing the FCC’s move last year to repeal its own rules for internet service providers. The legal briefs reflect a widening front in the multi-pronged campaign by consumer groups and tech companies to rescue regulations that originally barred providers from blocking websites or slowing them down. With the FCC’s changes, internet service providers may legally manipulate internet traffic as it travels over their infrastructure, so long as they disclose their practices to consumers.”

Inverse: Will Losing Net Neutrality Kill The Digital Museum?

Inverse: Will Losing Net Neutrality Kill The Digital Museum?. “The Metropolitan Museum now recognizes digital visitorship as an important constituency. Last year, their website had 31 million visitors, and they made 375,000 images available for public use (including all of the artworks in this story). Other museums have followed their lead and ramped up their online presence. Recently, the Rijksmuseum digitized more than 600,000 images, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art has more than 90,000 images available in their digital collections.”

Slate: Day 1 of a Worse Internet

Slate: Day 1 of a Worse Internet. “Monday, June 11, is the first day of the post–net neutrality internet. In December, the Federal Communications Commission voted to repeal the Obama-era rules that prohibit internet companies from slowing down or speeding up access to certain websites, but it took about six months for the repeal to get a signoff from the Office of Management and Budget and for the new rules to be published in the federal register. Beginning, well, now, your internet access could—emphasis on could—feel dramatically different than it did yesterday.”

Gizmodo: FCC Emails Show Agency Spread Lies to Bolster Dubious DDoS Attack Claims

Gizmodo: FCC Emails Show Agency Spread Lies to Bolster Dubious DDoS Attack Claims. “As it wrestled with accusations about a fake cyberattack last spring, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) purposely misled several news organizations, choosing to feed journalists false information, while at the same time discouraging them from challenging the agency’s official story.”