Gravwell Blog: Discovering truth through lies on the internet – FCC comments analyzed

Gravwell Blog: Discovering truth through lies on the internet – FCC comments analyzed. “For this post, the Gravwell analytics team ingested all 22 million+ comments submitted to the FCC over the net neutrality issue. Using Gravwell we were able to rapidly conduct a variety of analysis against the data to pull out some pretty interesting findings. We scraped the entirety of the FCC comments over the course of a night and ingested them into Gravwell afterward. It took about an hour of poking around to get a handle on what the data was and the following research was conducted over about a 12 hour period. So we went from zero knowledge to interesting insights in half a day. We’re kinda nerding out about it.”

The Guardian: FCC flooded with comments before critical net neutrality vote

The Guardian: FCC flooded with comments before critical net neutrality vote. “A sweeping plan to roll back Obama-era rules intended to ensure an open internet has drawn a record number of comments before a critical vote by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). With hours left before the window for public feedback closes on Wednesday, the agency has received nearly nearly 22m comments on ‘Restoring Internet Freedom’, which could dismantle net neutrality rules put in place in 2015.” Unfortunately it’s not clear how many of them were fraudulent.

Free Basics: Facebook’s failure at ‘digital equality’ (Al Jazeera)

Al Jazeera: Free Basics: Facebook’s failure at ‘digital equality’. “…while Free Basics may be ‘free’ in terms of money, it comes at another cost that Facebook is loathe to acknowledge, despite concerns raised by digital rights experts and activists. The app gives users access to only a tiny set of services, a clear violation of net neutrality. And it collects data about users and their activities on the app, without telling them how this data will be used.”

TechCrunch: FCC adds 2 weeks to comment period for the proposal to eliminate net neutrality rules

TechCrunch: FCC adds 2 weeks to comment period for the proposal to eliminate net neutrality rules. “The comment period for the FCC’s proposal to roll back the net neutrality rules established in 2015 was originally August 16 — next Wednesday. But after advocacy organizations asked the agency to add time to the clock in order to look through existing comments, the deadline has been extended (against the strenuous arguments of the broadband industry) by two weeks, to August 30.”

Recode: Facebook, Google and others are in a lose-lose position with an upcoming congressional net neutrality hearing

Recode: Facebook, Google and others are in a lose-lose position with an upcoming congressional net neutrality hearing. “A coming hearing in the U.S. Congress on net neutrality has left the likes of Amazon, Facebook, Google and Netflix in a tough position: They can either subject their chief executives to a potential grilling — or sit it out and take plenty of political heat.”

The Verge: Verizon admits to throttling video in apparent violation of net neutrality

The Verge: Verizon admits to throttling video in apparent violation of net neutrality . “Yesterday, we reported that Verizon Wireless appeared to be throttling Netflix traffic, — and today, the company seems to have come clean. In a statement provided to Ars Technica and The Verge, Verizon implicitly admitted to capping the traffic, blaming the issue on a temporary video optimization test.” Remember, Verizon owns Yahoo now. And it owns AOL.

Ars Technica: FCC refuses to release text of more than 40,000 net neutrality complaints

Ars Technica: FCC refuses to release text of more than 40,000 net neutrality complaints. “The National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC) filed a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request in May of this year for tens of thousands of net neutrality complaints that Internet users filed against their ISPs. The NHMC argues that the details of these complaints are crucial for analyzing FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s proposal to overturn net neutrality rules. The coalition also asked the FCC to extend the initial comment deadline until 60 days after the commission fully complies with the FoIA request. A deadline extension would have given people more time to file public comments on the plan to eliminate net neutrality rules. Instead, the FCC yesterday denied the motion for an extension and said that it will only provide the text for a fraction of the complaints, because providing them all would be too burdensome.” Pffft.