CNET: Internet sites to protest Trump Admin’s net neutrality plan

CNET: Internet sites to protest Trump Admin’s net neutrality plan. “A group of activists and websites including Imgur, Mozilla, Pinterest, Reddit, GitHub, Etsy, BitTorrent and Pornhub are planning a campaign Tuesday to draw attention to an upcoming FCC vote that could radically reshape the way the internet works. “

New York Times: Net Neutrality’s Holes in Europe May Offer Peek at Future in U.S.

New York Times: Net Neutrality’s Holes in Europe May Offer Peek at Future in U.S.. “The Federal Communications Commission is expected to vote on Thursday to roll back the net neutrality rules in the United States. While the European Union has such rules in place, telecom providers have pushed the boundaries at times in Sweden, Germany, Portugal and elsewhere, offering a glimpse at the future American companies and consumers may face if protections are watered down.”

Gizmodo: Use This Tool to See If Your Name Was Used to Support Net Neutrality Repeal

Gizmodo: Use This Tool to See If Your Name Was Used to Support Net Neutrality Repeal. “So far, the FCC has refused to cooperate with New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s investigation into identity theft during the commenting period on net neutrality repeal. So Schneiderman is using the internet to find the evidence and he needs help.”

Bloomberg: FCC Got 444,938 Net-Neutrality Comments From Russian Email Addresses

Bloomberg: FCC Got 444,938 Net-Neutrality Comments From Russian Email Addresses. “A study has found more than 7.75 million comments were submitted from email domains attributed to FakeMailGenerator.com, and they had nearly identical wording. The FCC says some of the nearly 23 million comments on Chairman Ajit Pai’s proposal to gut Obama-era rules were filed under the same name more than 90 times each. And then there were the 444,938 from Russian email addresses, which also raised eyebrows, even though it’s unclear if they were from actual Russian citizens or computer bots originating in the U.S. or elsewhere.”

Tim Wu: Why the Courts Will Have to Save Net Neutrality (New York Times)

New York Times: Tim Wu: Why the Courts Will Have to Save Net Neutrality. “Back in 2005, a small phone company based in North Carolina named Madison River began preventing its subscribers from making phone calls using the internet application Vonage. As Vonage was a competitor in the phone call market, Madison River’s action was obviously anticompetitive. Consumers complained, and the Federal Communications Commission, under Michael Powell, its Republican-appointed chairman, promptly fined the company and forced it to stop blocking Vonage. That was the moment when ‘net neutrality’ rules went from a mere academic proposal to a part of the United States legal order. On that foundation — an open internet, with no blocking — much of our current internet ecosystem was built.”

Washington Post: FCC net neutrality process ‘corrupted’ by fake comments and vanishing consumer complaints, officials say

Washington Post: FCC net neutrality process ‘corrupted’ by fake comments and vanishing consumer complaints, officials say. “As the Federal Communications Commission prepares to dismantle its net neutrality rules for Internet providers, a mounting backlash from agency critics is zeroing in on what they say are thousands of fake or automated comments submitted to the FCC that unfairly skewed the policymaking process. Allegations about anomalies in the record are quickly becoming a central component of a campaign by online activists and some government officials to discredit the FCC’s plan.”

PLOS: PLOS Supports Net Neutrality to Ensure Global Access to the Scientific Literature

PLOS: PLOS Supports Net Neutrality to Ensure Global Access to the Scientific Literature. “PLOS works to remove barriers to public access of scientific research. Typically, these barriers are considered in terms of copyrights and journal subscriptions, but unfettered access to network infrastructure also contributes to supporting readers’ access to scientific literature. In simple terms, unencumbered dissemination of scientific research depends on a fair Internet. The provision of a fair and open Internet lies in the hands of Internet Service Providers (ISPs) and government agencies that regulate these providers. PLOS supported the July 12, 2017 Day of Action in the United States, led by Battle for the Net, aimed at publicizing the issues surrounding Open Internet Rules and their critical role in maintaining Internet freedoms as currently in place.”