Inverse: Will Losing Net Neutrality Kill The Digital Museum?

Inverse: Will Losing Net Neutrality Kill The Digital Museum?. “The Metropolitan Museum now recognizes digital visitorship as an important constituency. Last year, their website had 31 million visitors, and they made 375,000 images available for public use (including all of the artworks in this story). Other museums have followed their lead and ramped up their online presence. Recently, the Rijksmuseum digitized more than 600,000 images, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art has more than 90,000 images available in their digital collections.”

Slate: Day 1 of a Worse Internet

Slate: Day 1 of a Worse Internet. “Monday, June 11, is the first day of the post–net neutrality internet. In December, the Federal Communications Commission voted to repeal the Obama-era rules that prohibit internet companies from slowing down or speeding up access to certain websites, but it took about six months for the repeal to get a signoff from the Office of Management and Budget and for the new rules to be published in the federal register. Beginning, well, now, your internet access could—emphasis on could—feel dramatically different than it did yesterday.”

Gizmodo: FCC Emails Show Agency Spread Lies to Bolster Dubious DDoS Attack Claims

Gizmodo: FCC Emails Show Agency Spread Lies to Bolster Dubious DDoS Attack Claims. “As it wrestled with accusations about a fake cyberattack last spring, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) purposely misled several news organizations, choosing to feed journalists false information, while at the same time discouraging them from challenging the agency’s official story.”

Techdirt: Senators Ask FCC Why It Did Nothing To Stop Their Names From Being Fraudulently Used During Net Neutrality Repeal

Techdirt: Senators Ask FCC Why It Did Nothing To Stop Their Names From Being Fraudulently Used During Net Neutrality Repeal. “Last year you’ll recall that somebody abused the nonexistent privacy protections at the FCC website to flood the net neutrality repeal proceeding with millions of fake comments. While the vast majority of real people oppose the repeal, a bad actor was able to either fraudulently use the identities of real people (like myself), or hijack the identities of dead people to spam the proceeding with bogus support. The goal: undermine public trust in the public comment period in order to downplay the massive opposition to the FCC’s handout to AT&T and Comcast.”

Mozilla Blog: Update on Fight for Net Neutrality in U.S. – Senate votes to save net neutrality, now it’s up to the House

Mozilla Blog: Update on Fight for Net Neutrality in U.S. – Senate votes to save net neutrality, now it’s up to the House. “[May 16], the U.S. Senate passed a Congressional Review Act (CRA) resolution to save net neutrality and overturn the FCC’s disastrous order to end net neutrality protections. We’re pleased this resolution passed – it’s a huge step, but the battle to protect net neutrality and reinstate the 2015 rules isn’t over. The next step is for the motion to go to the House of Representatives for a vote before the order is supposed to go into effect on June 11. Unfortunately, the rules in the House will make passage much harder than in the Senate; at this point, it’s not clear when, or if, there will be a vote there.”

Mashable: Tech keeps hitting the FCC over net neutrality

Mashable: Tech keeps hitting the FCC over net neutrality. “The internet isn’t letting net neutrality disappear without a fight. Several big tech companies, including Etsy, Expa, Kickstarter, Automattic, Foursquare, and Shutterstock, filed a petition on Monday with the Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit against the Federal Communication Commission’s decision to end net neutrality.”