TechCrunch: FCC adds 2 weeks to comment period for the proposal to eliminate net neutrality rules

TechCrunch: FCC adds 2 weeks to comment period for the proposal to eliminate net neutrality rules. “The comment period for the FCC’s proposal to roll back the net neutrality rules established in 2015 was originally August 16 — next Wednesday. But after advocacy organizations asked the agency to add time to the clock in order to look through existing comments, the deadline has been extended (against the strenuous arguments of the broadband industry) by two weeks, to August 30.”

Recode: Facebook, Google and others are in a lose-lose position with an upcoming congressional net neutrality hearing

Recode: Facebook, Google and others are in a lose-lose position with an upcoming congressional net neutrality hearing. “A coming hearing in the U.S. Congress on net neutrality has left the likes of Amazon, Facebook, Google and Netflix in a tough position: They can either subject their chief executives to a potential grilling — or sit it out and take plenty of political heat.”

The Verge: Verizon admits to throttling video in apparent violation of net neutrality

The Verge: Verizon admits to throttling video in apparent violation of net neutrality . “Yesterday, we reported that Verizon Wireless appeared to be throttling Netflix traffic, — and today, the company seems to have come clean. In a statement provided to Ars Technica and The Verge, Verizon implicitly admitted to capping the traffic, blaming the issue on a temporary video optimization test.” Remember, Verizon owns Yahoo now. And it owns AOL.

Ars Technica: FCC refuses to release text of more than 40,000 net neutrality complaints

Ars Technica: FCC refuses to release text of more than 40,000 net neutrality complaints. “The National Hispanic Media Coalition (NHMC) filed a Freedom of Information Act (FoIA) request in May of this year for tens of thousands of net neutrality complaints that Internet users filed against their ISPs. The NHMC argues that the details of these complaints are crucial for analyzing FCC Chairman Ajit Pai’s proposal to overturn net neutrality rules. The coalition also asked the FCC to extend the initial comment deadline until 60 days after the commission fully complies with the FoIA request. A deadline extension would have given people more time to file public comments on the plan to eliminate net neutrality rules. Instead, the FCC yesterday denied the motion for an extension and said that it will only provide the text for a fraction of the complaints, because providing them all would be too burdensome.” Pffft.

Daily Dot: Over 130 YouTube stars take a stand against the FCC’s net neutrality repeal

Daily Dot: Over 130 YouTube stars take a stand against the FCC’s net neutrality repeal. “A group of more than 130 YouTube personalities and online video creators have signed an open letter warning the Federal Communications Commission that dismantling net neutrality would be disastrous for them and their communities.”

The Verge: Verizon Is Killing Tumblr’s Fight For Net Neutrality

The Verge: Verizon Is Killing Tumblr’s Fight For Net Neutrality. “In 2014, Tumblr was on the front lines of the battle for net neutrality. The company stood alongside Amazon, Kickstarter, Etsy, Vimeo, Reddit, and Netflix during Battle for the Net’s day of action. Tumblr CEO David Karp was also part of a group of New York tech CEOs that met with then-FCC chairman Tom Wheeler in Brooklyn that summer, while the FCC was fielding public comment on new Title II rules. President Obama invited Karp to the White House to discuss various issues around public education, and in February 2015 The Wall Street Journal reported that it was the influence of Karp and a small group of liberal tech CEOs that swayed Obama toward a philosophy of internet as public utility. But three years later, as the battle for net neutrality heats up once again, Tumblr has been uncharacteristically silent.”

Inverse: The “Removal of Net Neutrality Simulator” Shows a Crap Internet

Inverse: The “Removal of Net Neutrality Simulator” Shows a Crap Internet. “The ‘Removal of Net Neutrality Simulator’ is a Google Chrome plugin designed to simulate the amount of control an internet service provider would have over your browsing if the government removes Title II regulations. The latest version came out on Tuesday, and honestly, you should not install it, because it makes performing even simple tasks like checking your email an annoying, slow, tedious mess. “