The Conversation: What do TikTok, Bunnings, eBay and Netflix have in common? They’re all hyper-collectors

The Conversation: What do TikTok, Bunnings, eBay and Netflix have in common? They’re all hyper-collectors . “Consumer data is big business. In 2019, a report from digital marketers WebFX showed that data from around 1,400 loyalty programs was routinely being traded across the globe as part of an industry worth around US$200 billion. That same year, the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission’s review of loyalty schemes revealed how many of these loyalty schemes lacked data transparency and even discriminated against vulnerable customers. But the digital environment is making data collection even easier.”

Engadget: Netflix is developing livestreaming features

Engadget: Netflix is developing livestreaming features. “Deadline suggests the streaming giant could use the technology to hold live voting for competitive shows like the upcoming Dance 100 and air sets from its annual Netflix Is A Joke festival, among other use cases. The feature doesn’t have a rollout date yet, with only a small team within the company reportedly in the ‘preliminary’ stages of developing the tech.”

Bleeping Computer: Dell, Apple, Netflix face lawsuits for pulling services out of Russia

Bleeping Computer: Dell, Apple, Netflix face lawsuits for pulling services out of Russia. “A Moscow Arbitration Court has reportedly seized almost $11 million belonging to Dell LLC after the company failed to provide paid-for services to a local system integrator. IT systems integrator Talmer sued Dell early last month when the American computer giant declined to provide technical support services for VMware as previously agreed. Dell is the representative of VMware in Russia and was reselling these services until March 1, 2022.”

MakeUseOf: You Can Now Watch the Ukrainian President’s Comedy Show on Netflix

MakeUseOf: You Can Now Watch the Ukrainian President’s Comedy Show on Netflix. “Servant of the People is a show that features former actor Volodymyr Zelenskyy, the current Ukrainian president. The show ran locally between 2015 and 2019, with Zelenskyy playing a teacher who, quite ironically, ended up becoming the country’s president. The show ended when Zelenskyy ran for president, and it is believed his popularity in the show helped him get elected.”

Vulture: Netflix Ratings Just Got a Little Less Secretive

Vulture: Netflix Ratings Just Got a Little Less Secretive. “Netflix is making good on its promise to start disclosing viewership stats on a regular basis. Reversing years of secrecy, the streaming giant today will start releasing a weekly report revealing not only the most popular programming on the service but exactly how many viewing hours those titles accumulated around the world over the preceding seven days.”

Squid Game and the ‘untranslatable’: the debate around subtitles explained (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Squid Game and the ‘untranslatable’: the debate around subtitles explained. “Not many people know the difference between translation and interpreting. To put it simply, translation refers to rendering of written texts from one language into another, whereas interpreting refers to spoken language. Subtitling falls between translation and interpreting, because a subtitler listens to spoken language just as an interpreter does, and translates the oral language into written form for viewers. Subtitling requires not only bilingual competence but specific skills essential to deliver messages within a limited space on screens.”

Tubefilter: Netflix Launching Virtual Book Club On Its YouTube And Facebook Channels

Tubefilter: Netflix Launching Virtual Book Club On Its YouTube And Facebook Channels. “Netflix Book Club content will be hosted by Orange Is The New Black star Uzo Aduba, and videos will live on Netflix’s Still Watching YouTube channel and the Netflix U.S. Facebook channel, beginning Nov. 16. A flagship Starbucks-sponsored series, titled But Have You Read The Book?, will see cast, creators, and authors chatting over a cup of coffee.”

‘The Billion Dollar Code’: The battle over Google Earth (Deutsche Welle)

Deutsche Welle: ‘The Billion Dollar Code’: The battle over Google Earth. “The Netflix miniseries tells in two timelines and four parts how two computer freaks developed their idea, convinced a large corporation and finally the whole world of its interest — only to be robbed of their fame and fortune by a tech giant’s legal ruse. With this German production, Netflix demonstrates once again that the setting of a story is not what matters most, but rather what it is about. The two developers could just as well have been from Japan or South Africa instead of Germany; the core of their tale is universal.”

Women Love Tech: Ada Twist, Scientist Encourages Kids to Enjoy Science with Netflix

Women Love Tech: Ada Twist, Scientist Encourages Kids to Enjoy Science with Netflix. “Netflix has released Ada Twist, Scientist with the goal of making science fun and accessible for everyone. The animated show follows 8-year-old Ada, a small scientist with a big sense of curiosity. She explores science to discover the truth about everything from chain reactions to evaporation. The series encourages children to be curious about their surroundings and take an active interest in why things happen and how things work.”

Mashable: 7 Google Chrome extensions to spice up Netflix

Mashable: 7 Google Chrome extensions to spice up Netflix. “Whether you’re tired of mindlessly scrolling through the home screen to find a new comfort show now that The Office is gone, or if you’re over Googling reviews to make sure you won’t ruin a hook-up by watching something depressing, here are seven Chrome extensions that will elevate Netflix for you.”

Education Technology: Are we entering the era of ‘Netflix and skill’?

Education Technology: Are we entering the era of ‘Netflix and skill’?. “This generation is being built on-demand. We want things efficiently and with a click of a button. With all the smart technology that surrounds us, we have become somewhat spoilt in terms of being offered a ‘unique online experience’. Our YouTube suggestions will be personalised, and our Facebook ads are specially targeted; whether you agree with it or whether it freaks you out, we can’t deny that it’s handy as it has streamlined many everyday processes, from shopping to watching TV.”

The Register: Facebook used facial recognition without consent 200,000 times, says South Korea’s data watchdog

The Register: Facebook used facial recognition without consent 200,000 times, says South Korea’s data watchdog . “Facebook, Netflix and Google have all received reprimands or fines, and an order to make corrective action, from South Korea’s government data protection watchdog, the Personal Information Protection Commission (PIPC). The PIPC announced a privacy audit last year and has revealed that three companies – Facebook, Netflix and Google – were in violations of laws and had insufficient privacy protection.”