Covid: Dutch police arrest quarantine hotel escapees (BBC)

BBC: Covid: Dutch police arrest quarantine hotel escapees. “Dutch police say they have detained a couple who escaped from a Covid-quarantine hotel. The arrests were made on a plane in Amsterdam’s Schiphol airport just before it departed to Spain on Sunday. The Spanish man and Portuguese woman were later handed over to the country’s health service, local media reported.”

AFP: Dutch Police Arrest Dozens Over New Covid Riots

AFP: Dutch Police Arrest Dozens Over New Covid Riots. “Dutch police said Sunday they had arrested 48 people after a second night of violent riots erupted over the government’s coronavirus measures. Prosecutors meanwhile updated to four the number of people shot when police opened fire during an ‘orgy of violence’ in the port city of Rotterdam on Friday night.”

Reuters: Dutch COVID-19 Patients Transferred to Germany as Hospitals Struggle

Reuters: Dutch COVID-19 Patients Transferred to Germany as Hospitals Struggle. “The Netherlands started transporting COVID-19 patients across the border to Germany on Tuesday to ease pressure on Dutch hospitals, which are scaling back regular care to deal with a surge in coronavirus cases. A patient was transferred by ambulance from Rotterdam to a hospital in Bochum, some 240 km (150 miles) east, on Tuesday morning, and another would follow later in the day, health authorities said.”

BBC: Rotterdam police clash with rioters as Covid protest turns violent

BBC: Rotterdam police clash with rioters as Covid protest turns violent. “Dutch police have shot and wounded at least two people after rioting erupted in Rotterdam over new Covid-19 measures. Protesters threw rocks and fireworks at them and set police cars ablaze. Hundreds of protesters had gathered to show their anger at government plans for a Covid vaccine pass, and a ban on fireworks on New Year’s Eve.”

Dutch News: No good and bad names: Rotterdam sets up street history database

Dutch News: No good and bad names: Rotterdam sets up street history database. “Rotterdam city council is to make sure all streets within its boundaries link to a database explaining where the name came from, to boost awareness of the city’s colonial and slavery heritage. But rather than divide the city into ‘good’ and ‘bad’ streets, the council has voted give all 6,402 roads a detailed explanation instead.”

NL Times: Digital archive of WWII forced laborers in the works

NL Times: Digital archive of WWII forced laborers in the works. “If you want to know where a family member or other acquaintance had to work during the Second World War, it will soon be a lot easier to get this information from the National Archives. The organization is working on making data on forced laborers available digitally. According to the National Archives, approximately 500,000 Dutch people had to work in Germany or countries occupied by Germany during the Second World War.”

National Geographic: Dog collar or slave collar? A Dutch museum interrogates a brutal past.

National Geographic: Dog collar or slave collar? A Dutch museum interrogates a brutal past.. “When a finely engraved 17th-century golden collar was donated to the Rijksmuseum, the Netherlands’ national museum in 1881, it was labeled as a dog collar. But a few years ago, when the museum reexamined its collections for its recent exhibition on the Dutch slave trade, curators realized the beautiful object had an ugly past.”

The Register: Dutch education IT crisis averted as Google agrees to ‘major privacy improvements’

The Register: Dutch education IT crisis averted as Google agrees to ‘major privacy improvements’. “Google has agreed to ‘major privacy improvements’ following a threat to ban the use of Google Workspace in education by the Dutch Data Protection Authority (DPA). In March, Privacy Company concluded that eight out of 10 high privacy risks in Google’s productivity suite, Workspace, remained. The Dutch educational institutions then asked the Dutch DPA for advice. At the end of May the DPA warned schools and universities to stop using Google Workspace for Education before the start of the new school year.”

Core 77: UNESCO Names Dutch Water Defence Lines a World Heritage Site

Core 77: UNESCO Names Dutch Water Defence Lines a World Heritage Site. “UNESCO has announced that they’ve named the Dutch Water Defence Lines a World Heritage Site. Also referred to as the Dutch Water Lines, it’s a comprehensive network of dikes, sluices, waterworks and fortresses developed in the 17th Century as a clever solution to dealing with foreign invaders. Essentially, the Dutch created the infrastructure to flood the surrounding areas on demand, making it difficult for enemy troops to reach their targets.”

EurekAlert: Digital disclosure of Dutch East India Company archives by Huygens Institute

EurekAlert: Digital disclosure of Dutch East India Company archives by Huygens Institute. “Together with the VU Amsterdam, the National Archives, the International Institute for Social History and the Humanities Cluster of the Royal Netherlands Academy, the Huygens Institute for History of the Netherlands is building a state-of-the-art scientific infrastructure, enabling a better understanding of colonial history, the Dutch East India Company and the early-modern histories of countries and cultures of the Indian Ocean and Indonesian Archipelago Worlds.”

NL Times: Massive archive of Dutch slavery past published in digital archive

NL Times: Massive archive of Dutch slavery past published in digital archive. “The national archive of the Netherlands launched a virtual archive containing around 1.9 million documents about the Dutch history of slavery. The archives consist of restored material from the West India Company, the commercial slave trader Middelburgse Commercie Compagnie, the Suriname Society and documents about the Dutch occupation of the coast of Guinea. Caretaker education minister Ingrid van Engelshoven launched the archive on Friday. It is mainly comprise slave purchase records, ship logs, plantation lists, cargo overviews and invoices. Personal letters are also included, though they have not been fully investigated.”