CNN: LinkedIn is having a moment thanks to a wave of layoffs

CNN: LinkedIn is having a moment thanks to a wave of layoffs. “In a normal year at this time, a typical LinkedIn feed might be full of posts about year-end reflections on leadership and professional goals and suggested lifehacks for the year ahead — possibly with a few posts from CMOs offering tips on brand strategy, for good measure. Those posts are still there. But mixed in are many others about job hunts, offers of support for laid off friends and colleagues, and advice for coping with career hurdles in an uncertain economic environment.”

Fast Company: How to create a mini-website in 10 minutes

Fast Company: How to create a mini-website in 10 minutes. “You need a presence online. If you don’t yet have one, consider starting with a ‘link-in-bio’ page—a mini-website that lists your most important links. You can include a brief bio and social links. Later you can build a fuller site with multiple sub-pages, if necessary. Read on for why a mini-site is useful, what to use it for, and recommendations for good free services.”

CNBC: Sharing your layoff on LinkedIn isn’t an ‘act of shame’ anymore—and it could be a smart career move

CNBC: Sharing your layoff on LinkedIn isn’t an ‘act of shame’ anymore—and it could be a smart career move. “Spend any amount of time on LinkedIn these days and you’ll see workers are increasingly leveraging the platform to announce their layoffs — just as quickly as they’d announce a new job or promotion. The vulnerability is ‘tremendous’ to see, says Albert Ko, the director of sales at AngelList Talent who’s been through five rounds of layoffs in his 15-year career (including two where he lost his job).”

Should I join Mastodon? A scientists’ guide to Twitter’s rival (Nature)

Nature: Should I join Mastodon? A scientists’ guide to Twitter’s rival. “Bolstered by positive news coverage, it’s becoming the most popular alternative to Twitter. Since 27 October, almost half a million new users have flocked to the service, roughly doubling its user base. As Twitter users wonder whether, and when, they should make the leap, Nature looks at the benefits and drawbacks for researchers.”

Krebs on Security: Battle with Bots Prompts Mass Purge of Amazon, Apple Employee Accounts on LinkedIn

Krebs on Security: Battle with Bots Prompts Mass Purge of Amazon, Apple Employee Accounts on LinkedIn. “On October 10, 2022, there were 576,562 LinkedIn accounts that listed their current employer as Apple Inc. The next day, half of those profiles no longer existed. A similarly dramatic drop in the number of LinkedIn profiles claiming employment at Amazon comes as LinkedIn is struggling to combat a significant uptick in the creation of fake employee accounts that pair AI-generated profile photos with text lifted from legitimate users.”

Krebs on Security: Glut of Fake LinkedIn Profiles Pits HR Against the Bots

Krebs on Security: Glut of Fake LinkedIn Profiles Pits HR Against the Bots. “A recent proliferation of phony executive profiles on LinkedIn is creating something of an identity crisis for the business networking site, and for companies that rely on it to hire and screen prospective employees. The fabricated LinkedIn identities — which pair AI-generated profile photos with text lifted from legitimate accounts — are creating major headaches for corporate HR departments and for those managing invite-only LinkedIn groups.”

New York Times: How LinkedIn Became a Place to Overshare

New York Times: How LinkedIn Became a Place to Overshare. “Since the start of the pandemic, as office workers missed in-person interactions with colleagues, many people turned to LinkedIn to help make up for what they had lost. They started talking about more than just work. The boundaries between office and home lives became blurrier than ever. As personal circumstances bled into workdays, people felt emboldened to share with their professional peers — and found interested audiences both in and beyond their networks.”

Texas McCombs: Tweeting Their Way to Higher Pay

Texas McCombs: Tweeting Their Way to Higher Pay. “In a recent study, Texas McCombs professor of information, risk, and operations management Andrew Whinston found that savvy executive candidates such as CEOs and CIOs who modestly — but frequently — tout their knowledge, expertise, and skills on Twitter were 32% more likely to attract higher-paying job offers after interviews.”