First Covid, Then Psychosis: ‘The Most Terrifying Thing I’ve Ever Experienced’ (New York Times)

New York Times: First Covid, Then Psychosis: ‘The Most Terrifying Thing I’ve Ever Experienced’. “Doctors say such symptoms may be one manifestation of brain-related aftereffects of Covid-19. Along with more common issues like brain fog, memory loss and neurological problems, ‘new onset’ psychosis may result from an immune response, vascular issues or inflammation from the disease process, experts hypothesize. Sporadic cases have occurred with other viruses, and while such extreme symptoms are likely to affect only a small proportion of Covid survivors, cases have emerged worldwide.”

Newswise: What happens in your brain when you ‘lose yourself’ in fiction

Newswise: What happens in your brain when you ‘lose yourself’ in fiction. “If you count yourself among those who lose themselves in the lives of fictional characters, scientists now have a better idea of how that happens. Researchers found that the more immersed people tend to get into ‘becoming’ a fictional character, the more they use the same part of the brain to think about the character as they do to think about themselves.”

News Medical: NIH launches database to collect information about COVID-19-related neurological problems

News Medical: NIH launches database to collect information about COVID-19-related neurological problems. “The COVID-19 Neuro Databank/Biobank (NeuroCOVID), which was created and will be maintained by NYU Langone Health, New York City, will be a resource of clinical information as well as biospecimens from people of all ages who have experienced neurological problems associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection.”

Yahoo: Study finds brain abnormalities ‘common’ in COVID-19 patients

Yahoo: Study finds brain abnormalities ‘common’ in COVID-19 patients. “Researchers at the Baylor College of Medicine reviewed 84 studies involving more than 600 patients who had been diagnosed with COVID-19. The median age was 61, and two-thirds of the patients were men, while one-third were women. The study’s authors examined the results of patients’ electroencephalograms — known as EEGs, the tests detect abnormalities in brain waves, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine — and found that brain abnormalities in COVID-19 patients were ‘common.’”

EurekAlert: Human Brain Project launches ‘Brain Matters’ webinar series

EurekAlert: Human Brain Project launches ‘Brain Matters’ webinar series. “The hour-long sessions will focus on different areas of brain research and feature expert speakers, with the goal of highlighting the HBP’s scientific achievements and the state-of-the-art services offered by its new infrastructure for brain research, EBRAINS.” The webinars are free and open to the public.

New York Times: How the Coronavirus Attacks the Brain

New York Times: How the Coronavirus Attacks the Brain. “A new study offers the first clear evidence that, in some people, the coronavirus invades brain cells, hijacking them to make copies of itself. The virus also seems to suck up all of the oxygen nearby, starving neighboring cells to death. It’s unclear how the virus gets to the brain or how often it sets off this trail of destruction. Infection of the brain is likely to be rare, but some people may be susceptible because of their genetic backgrounds, a high viral load or other reasons.”

El Pais: Over half of coronavirus patients in Spain have developed neurological problems, studies show

El Pais: Over half of coronavirus patients in Spain have developed neurological problems, studies show. “The SARS-CoV-2 coronavirus attacks the respiratory system, but there is growing evidence that it also affects the nervous system. Several studies based on thousands of Spanish patients show that most of these individuals developed at least one neurological problem. This manifested itself in a wide range of symptoms, ranging from headaches to comatose states. In a percentage of cases, neurological conditions were even the principal cause of death. Although these symptoms have been attributed to the body’s excessive immune response to Covid-19, some research indicates that the virus is directly attacking the brain.”

STAT News: When Covid-19 hits the brain, it can cause strokes, psychosis and a dementia-like syndrome, new survey shows

STAT News: When Covid-19 hits the brain, it can cause strokes, psychosis and a dementia-like syndrome, new survey shows . “A new survey reveals a wide range of serious psychiatric and neurological complications tied to Covid-19 — including stroke, psychosis, and a dementia-like syndrome. The study underscores how aggressively the coronavirus can attack beyond the lungs, and the risk the disease can pose to younger adults.”

Financial Times: Coronavirus could infect human brain and replicate, US study shows

Financial Times, and not paywalled, at least for me: Coronavirus could infect human brain and replicate, US study shows. “US scientists have found the first direct evidence that coronavirus could infect the human brain and replicate inside its cells, heightening concern about the disease’s poorly understood neurological symptoms. Thomas Hartung and colleagues at Johns Hopkins University made the discovery after adding low levels of Sars-Cov-2, the virus responsible for Covid-19, to tiny neuronal balls known as mini-brains that are grown from human stem cells.”

Health Europa: AI collaboration creates largest brain haemorrhage image database

Health Europa: AI collaboration creates largest brain haemorrhage image database. “The creation of the brain haemorrhage image database stems from the most recent edition of the Radiology Society of North America (RSNA) Artificial Intelligence (AI) Challenge. The two medical societies, RSNA and the American Society of Neuroradiology (ASNR), along with 60 volunteers, have created the collection that includes expertly annotated images.”

BuzzFeed News: Is Lurking Hurting My Brain?

BuzzFeed News: Is Lurking Hurting My Brain?. “I’m not worried about how much time I spend on my phone, to be honest, because I find online to be an oasis of mirth compared to the physical world. I have KonMari-ed my feeds so that Twitter brings me nothing but joy, Groups on Facebook bring me interesting discussion with likeminded people, and TikTok shows me teenagers being funny. I may be addicted to my phone, but I’m a highly functional addict. I’m fine! I love it! But one night, deep into a TikTok scrolling session, it occurred to me: What is it doing to my brain?”