Carnegie Mellon University: Machine Learning Algorithm Revolutionizes How Scientists Study Behavior

Carnegie Mellon University: Machine Learning Algorithm Revolutionizes How Scientists Study Behavior. “As a behavioral neuroscientist, Yttri studies what happens in the brain when animals walk, eat, sniff or do any action. This kind of research could help answer questions about neurological diseases or disorders like Parkinson’s disease or stroke. But identifying and predicting animal behavior is extremely difficult. Now, a new unsupervised machine learning algorithm developed by [Professor Eric] Yttri and Alex Hsu, a biological sciences Ph.D. candidate in his lab, makes studying behavior much easier and more accurate.”

News@Northeastern: You Can’t Determine Emotion From Someone’s Facial Movements–and Neither Can AI

News@Northeastern: You Can’t Determine Emotion From Someone’s Facial Movements–and Neither Can AI. “If you saw a person with their brow furrowed, mouth turned down, and eyes squinted, would you guess they’re angry? What if you found out they’d forgotten their reading glasses and were deciphering a restaurant menu Interpreting a person’s facial movements can’t be done in a vacuum; it depends on the context—something that Northeastern neuroscientist Lisa Feldman Barrett shows in a groundbreaking new study published Thursday in the scientific journal Nature Communications.”

National Geographic: How does COVID-19 affect the brain? A troubling picture emerges.

National Geographic: How does COVID-19 affect the brain? A troubling picture emerges.. “Hannah Davis contracted COVID-19 in March 2020, the early days of the pandemic. At the time, the New Yorker was a healthy, 32-year-old freelance data scientist and artist. But unlike many people who come down with the disease, Davis’s first sign of infection wasn’t a dry cough or fever. Her first symptom was that she couldn’t read a text message from a friend. She thought she was just tired, but the fuzziness she felt didn’t go away after a full night’s sleep. More neurological issues followed.”

Baylor College of Medicine: Largest 3D mouse brain map to help understand what makes brains smarter

Baylor College of Medicine: Largest 3D mouse brain map to help understand what makes brains smarter. “Neuroscientists seeking to understand how the brain processes information along neocortical circuits, and researchers wanting to treat brain disorders where wiring or connections are altered now have a new analytical tool at their fingertips: the largest 3D wiring diagram of the mouse brain containing hundreds of thousands of cells and nearly half a billion connections.”

EurekAlert: Neuroscientists to build video dataset that catches people looking (at everything)

EurekAlert: Neuroscientists to build video dataset that catches people looking (at everything). “To better understand the organization of the brain and the perceptual tendencies in humans, a team of four scientists are recording video from four head-mounted cameras – with eyetracking and head movement – and assembling a massive video database with more than 240 hours of first-person video that can be used by researchers everywhere.”

New Open-Access, Peer-Reviewed, Video Journal: Neurosurgical Focus: Video (Newswise)

Newswise: New Open-Access, Peer-Reviewed, Video Journal: Neurosurgical Focus: Video. “In 2012, our journal Neurosurgical Focus began publishing video supplements on operative techniques twice a year. Since that time, viewer interest in the educational video format has grown enormously and so, too, has the number of submissions. We saw the need for an enhanced platform and are pleased to present Neurosurgical Focus: Video as an independent, Web-based, open-access, quarterly journal.”

“The brain is just so amazing:” New Instagram video series explains neuroscience (Stanford Medicine)

Stanford Medicine: “The brain is just so amazing:” New Instagram video series explains neuroscience. “Many people make New Year’s resolutions to exercise more or eat healthier. Not Stanford neurobiology professor Andrew Huberman, PhD. This year, he set out to educate the public about exciting discoveries in neuroscience using Instagram. Huberman’s sights are high: he pledged to post on Instagram one-minute educational videos about neuroscience an average of five times per week for an entire year. I recently spoke with him to see how he’s doing on his resolution.”

PR Newswire: Journal of Biomedical Optics and Neurophotonics to become fully open access journals (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Journal of Biomedical Optics and Neurophotonics to become fully open access journals (PRESS RELEASE). “SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, has announced that its Journal of Biomedical Optics and Neurophotonics will become fully open access journals in January 2019. The Journal of Biomedical Optics (JBO) has been published since 1996 and is edited by Lihong Wang of California Institute of Technology. Brian Pogue of Dartmouth College will assume the JBO editorship starting in January 2018. JBO publishes peer-reviewed papers on the use of modern optical technology for improved health care and biomedical research. Neurophotonics, edited by David Boas of Boston University, was launched by SPIE in 2014, and covers optical technologies applicable to study of the brain and their impact on the basic and clinical neuroscience applications.”

Semantic Scholar Search Engine Adds Another Focus

Semantic Scholar is getting another focus. “The Allen Institute’s latest effort is Semantic Scholar, a scientific-paper search engine powered by machine learning and other artificial intelligence systems. Semantic Scholar went live in November 2015 with a focus on computer science papers. Today, the service expanded to include neuroscience, bringing the search engine’s database to more than 10 million papers.” More to come, according to the article.