Los Angeles Times: After Katrina, a priceless musical archive was thought lost. It showed up in Torrance

Los Angeles Times: After Katrina, a priceless musical archive was thought lost. It showed up in Torrance. “Hurricane Katrina pushed into New Orleans early in the morning of Aug. 29, 2005, and within a few hours, the first floodwaters had crossed the doorway of Sea-Saint Studio. One by one, the three outfall canals bordering Lake Ponchartrain failed and water rushed into Gentilly, the quiet residential neighborhood where Allen Toussaint’s home and studio were located. Even as the storm moved out, the lake continued to pour itself into the city. The next day, Aug. 30, skies were blue and Sea-Saint was fully submerged.”

Tulane University: Hogan Jazz Archive awarded grant to digitize recordings of first African American DJ in New Orleans

Tulane University: Hogan Jazz Archive awarded grant to digitize recordings of first African American DJ in New Orleans. “The Hogan Jazz Archive of the Howard Tilton Memorial Library was awarded a $11,500 grant from the GRAMMY Museum Grant Program to digitize and preserve recordings from Vernon Winslow, the first African American disc jockey in New Orleans.”

NOLA: After a Facebook fracas, online map, new support network for black New Orleans restaurants

NOLA: After a Facebook fracas, online map, new support network for black New Orleans restaurants. “In mid-July, with some unexpected time on his hands as Tropical Storm Barry effectively shut down the city, [Westley] Bayas decided to do something about it. He created an online map to help connect the dots, and connect more people with more of these restaurants, the Where Black NOLA Eat maps (see the map here and below). Today it shows 116 businesses, from full-service restaurants to bars and sno-ball stands.”

Kickstarter Project: Preserve & digitize 30,000 historic New Orleans newspapers

Sounds like an awesome Kickstarter project: Preserve & digitize 30,000 historic New Orleans newspapers . “Currently, the entire collection is housed safely at our New Orleans headquarters where it will stay in the original Mylar sleeves until we have the full capability to process and re-enter it into record with our proposed unprecedented image quality and data utility. Our next major undertaking is to scan and digitize the entire New Orleans DNA holdings–over 500,000 sides of newsprint & special supplements, mostly from The Daily Picayune and Times-Picayune from 1888-1929, a collection unrivaled in both continuity and condition.”

The New Orleans Advocate: King cake baby too lewd for Facebook? Post violation for nudity leaves company ‘shocked’

The New Orleans Advocate: King cake baby too lewd for Facebook? Post violation for nudity leaves company ‘shocked’. “King Cake Snob is a competition run annually by Innovative Advertising, a Mandeville-based company, which ranks king cakes from across the region. As part of its usual marketing push, the group tried to post sponsored Facebook ads featuring tiny baby dolls, the totems traditionally found in the classic Carnival treat. But the sight of plastic babies wearing nothing but their birthday suits led Facebook to block the ads.”

4WWL: New website offers a peek at the French Quarter’s past

4WWL: New website offers a peek at the French Quarter’s past. “It’s only 13 blocks long and six blocks deep, but the French Quarter has countless stories. And now many of them are available with the click of a mouse. The non-profit Vieux Carre Commission Foundation has launched the Vieux Carré Virtual Library… a new website that catalogs tens of thousands of images and documents for the nearly 4,000 structures in the city’s oldest and most famous neighborhood.”

Ars Technica: How do you preserve beloved New Orleans folk art? A Web font, of course

Ars Technica: How do you preserve beloved New Orleans folk art? A Web font, of course. “Few if any cities value local culture as much as New Orleans, but even the Crescent City has to navigate modern realities of change. And as new residents move in or new businesses replace old ones, some beloved bits of the city’s artistic fabric occasionally need intentional preservation. Case in point: the work of Lester Carey.”