Shining down: Doreen Ketchens releases two new albums (NOLA Gambit)

NOLA Gambit: Shining down: Doreen Ketchens releases two new albums. “Clarinetist and vocalist Doreen Ketchens has aimed to release an album every year since the mid-’90s — and occasionally has hit two or even three releases. The plan going into 2020 was to keep up the pace when she and her band, Doreen’s Jazz New Orleans, booked studio time in February and started working on the new recordings. Of course, no one’s plans worked out in 2020.” The first time I heard Doreen Ketchens play clarinet was on a YouTube video. I wanted to run down the street and knock on people’s doors and tell them about this brilliant clarinetist. Do yourself a favor and listen to her play and sing “When the Saints Go Marching In”.

NOLA: Tipitina’s, the Howlin’ Wolf to reopen with limited-capacity shows this weekend

NOLA: Tipitina’s, the Howlin’ Wolf to reopen with limited-capacity shows this weekend. “For the first time since the coronavirus pandemic commenced a year ago, Tipitina’s and the Howlin’ Wolf plan to open to the public. Tipitina’s will host keyboardist and singer Ivan Neville for two limited-capacity, seated-only ‘Piano Session’ shows Friday, at 7 and 9:30 p.m. Both shows sold out not long after tickets went on sale Monday.”

Tulane News: Tulane University jazz archive gets new name and expanded mission

Tulane News: Tulane University jazz archive gets new name and expanded mission. “Tulane University Special Collections (TUSC) is pleased to announce an expanded mission and new name for its famed music archive. Previously known as the Hogan Jazz Archive, the reconceived Hogan Archive of New Orleans Music and New Orleans Jazz will expand the scope of its collections, including acquisitions that document late 20th century and 21st-century contemporary jazz, rhythm and blues, funk, hip hop and rock musicians in New Orleans and the surrounding region, as well as the industry and culture that fosters and supports those artists.”

Good Housekeeping: 7 Virtual Mardi Gras Events That’ll Bring the Party to Your House

Good Housekeeping: 7 Virtual Mardi Gras Events That’ll Bring the Party to Your House. “Back in November, New Orleans Mayor LaToya Cantrell confirmed that Mardi Gras 2021 is ‘not canceled, just different.’ In fact, she clarified that Mardi Gras is ‘a religious holiday and in no way will it be canceled in our city.’ She’s right: While many of the public events that draw massive crowds have been called off due to health and safety concerns, there are so many virtual Mardi Gras events taking place, so those who celebrate can enjoy the holiday festivities while adhering to social distancing guidelines. Take a look at these virtual events, all of which are taking place in the first two weeks of February, to find fun ways to bring the party and incredible spirit of New Orleans to your home.”

Boing Boing: Mardi Gras spirit perseveres with “Yardi Gras” house floats

Boing Boing: Mardi Gras spirit perseveres with “Yardi Gras” house floats. “Although COVID-19 has grounded the traditional Mardi Gras parades and celebrations this year, New Orleans will always find a way to party (albeit with less titties and barfing in the streets). Artists are transforming houses across the city into ‘stationary floats’. The idea started as a joke on social media and has grown into a citywide phenomenon. Participating neighbors plan to play music and/or throw beads to passers-by from their front porches or yards, all while safely social distancing.”

Gambit: Community radio station WWOZ marks its 40th anniversary

Gambit: Community radio station WWOZ marks its 40th anniversary. “During the pandemic, WWOZ has also broadcast full sets recorded at local festivals and clubs. When the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival was pre-empted in spring, WWOZ, whose license is held by the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation, broadcast past sets during what would have been eight days of festival hours. ‘Festing in Place’ was born, but it also happened during a time when the station quietly launched Groovapedia, a searchable online archive of videos, interviews, music recordings, photos and more.”

Gambit: House floats, digital parades and lessons from history, New Orleans reimagines Mardi Gras

Gambit: House floats, digital parades and lessons from history, New Orleans reimagines Mardi Gras. “New Orleanians are a resourceful bunch, and have a knack for finding a reason, and a way, to party even in the darkest of times. We’re already beginning to see the signs of ingenuity and innovation, and from virtual parades to ‘house floats,’ krewes and creatives are responding to the challenge of how to safely celebrate Carnival in a pandemic. In this issue of Gambit, we’ve taken a look at where we’re at, so to speak, and also where we’ve been. ‘Cause this won’t be the first time New Orleans has had to party in a pandemic, and we might could just learn a lesson or two from how the ancestors did it 100 years ago.”

Los Angeles Times: After Katrina, a priceless musical archive was thought lost. It showed up in Torrance

Los Angeles Times: After Katrina, a priceless musical archive was thought lost. It showed up in Torrance. “Hurricane Katrina pushed into New Orleans early in the morning of Aug. 29, 2005, and within a few hours, the first floodwaters had crossed the doorway of Sea-Saint Studio. One by one, the three outfall canals bordering Lake Ponchartrain failed and water rushed into Gentilly, the quiet residential neighborhood where Allen Toussaint’s home and studio were located. Even as the storm moved out, the lake continued to pour itself into the city. The next day, Aug. 30, skies were blue and Sea-Saint was fully submerged.”

Tulane University: Hogan Jazz Archive awarded grant to digitize recordings of first African American DJ in New Orleans

Tulane University: Hogan Jazz Archive awarded grant to digitize recordings of first African American DJ in New Orleans. “The Hogan Jazz Archive of the Howard Tilton Memorial Library was awarded a $11,500 grant from the GRAMMY Museum Grant Program to digitize and preserve recordings from Vernon Winslow, the first African American disc jockey in New Orleans.”

NOLA: After a Facebook fracas, online map, new support network for black New Orleans restaurants

NOLA: After a Facebook fracas, online map, new support network for black New Orleans restaurants. “In mid-July, with some unexpected time on his hands as Tropical Storm Barry effectively shut down the city, [Westley] Bayas decided to do something about it. He created an online map to help connect the dots, and connect more people with more of these restaurants, the Where Black NOLA Eat maps (see the map here and below). Today it shows 116 businesses, from full-service restaurants to bars and sno-ball stands.”

Kickstarter Project: Preserve & digitize 30,000 historic New Orleans newspapers

Sounds like an awesome Kickstarter project: Preserve & digitize 30,000 historic New Orleans newspapers . “Currently, the entire collection is housed safely at our New Orleans headquarters where it will stay in the original Mylar sleeves until we have the full capability to process and re-enter it into record with our proposed unprecedented image quality and data utility. Our next major undertaking is to scan and digitize the entire New Orleans DNA holdings–over 500,000 sides of newsprint & special supplements, mostly from The Daily Picayune and Times-Picayune from 1888-1929, a collection unrivaled in both continuity and condition.”

The New Orleans Advocate: King cake baby too lewd for Facebook? Post violation for nudity leaves company ‘shocked’

The New Orleans Advocate: King cake baby too lewd for Facebook? Post violation for nudity leaves company ‘shocked’. “King Cake Snob is a competition run annually by Innovative Advertising, a Mandeville-based company, which ranks king cakes from across the region. As part of its usual marketing push, the group tried to post sponsored Facebook ads featuring tiny baby dolls, the totems traditionally found in the classic Carnival treat. But the sight of plastic babies wearing nothing but their birthday suits led Facebook to block the ads.”