New York Times: A Stand-Up Set at the Swipe of a MetroCard

New York Times: A Stand-Up Set at the Swipe of a MetroCard. “For about three months, New York’s comics had been preparing sets to perform Saturday nights on the 1 train. It may not have been the most glamorous of gigs, but as a comic joked last Saturday, at least it was cleaned regularly. The relentless screeching of the subway had a tendency to drown out punch lines, but a few of the comics agreed that wasn’t so different from the hum of activity in a typical club — the clinking of glasses, the waiters whispering, ‘What can I get you?’”

Gothamist: East Village Drag & Punk Venue Pyramid Club Closes Due To Pandemic

Gothamist: East Village Drag & Punk Venue Pyramid Club Closes Due To Pandemic. “East Village mainstay Pyramid Club, which has served as a neighborhood institution and longtime drag, punk and dance venue since the 1980s, has permanently closed. Managers Maria Narciso and Quirino Perez made the announcement on Instagram on Thursday morning. They wrote that the shuttering of the 41-year-old club, which had been closed since March 7th, 2020, was due to the pandemic.”

The City: One in 10 Local COVID Victims Destined for Hart Island, NYC’s Potter’s Field

The City: One in 10 Local COVID Victims Destined for Hart Island, NYC’s Potter’s Field. “More people were buried on Hart Island in 2020 than any year during the AIDS epidemic — and the city is on pace to inter one in 10 of its COVID-19 victims in the potter’s field. An exclusive analysis of city data, public records and interviews with dozens of local officials indicates at least 2,334 adults were buried on Hart Island in 2020 — 2 ½ times the figure recorded in 2019 and about 1,000 more than in 1988, the peak year for AIDS burials.”

New York Times: What the ‘Invisible’ People Cleaning the Subway Want Riders to Know

New York Times: What the ‘Invisible’ People Cleaning the Subway Want Riders to Know. “The thousands of workers the contractors hired — largely low-income immigrants from Latin America — were envisioned as a stopgap measure, as M.T.A. workers were falling ill and dying of the virus. At the same time, ridership and revenue had plummeted and the agency found itself in an intense budget crunch. But nearly a year later, the workers are still toiling at stations all over the city, some paid as little as half as much as the M.T.A. employees who did the same work before the pandemic began, and many without access to health insurance.”

New York Post: How I survived a year in a weird and empty Manhattan

New York Post: How I survived a year in a weird and empty Manhattan. “When did I realize this time was different? There is empty, and there is empty. I’ve had the run of a near-empty Midtown before, when a snowstorm, for example, kept people from commuting. But even then, global tourists walking around Times Square have been company. By the second week of last March, empty was different. Our newspaper vendor, an always-in-a-good-mood older man reliably out selling his wares by the subway, was gone. Rain, shine, heat wave, snow, he had never missed a weekday — and he hasn’t returned for a year now. Empty meant the scammy ‘charity’ solicitors with their cardboard boxes for ‘donations’ were gone.”

New York Times: Mixed Virus Data Has Some Experts Questioning Pace of N.Y.C. Reopening

New York Times: Mixed Virus Data Has Some Experts Questioning Pace of N.Y.C. Reopening. “Daily coronavirus cases reported in the city and state appear to have reached a plateau after a post-holiday spike, death rates and hospitalization rates related to the virus are on the decline, and more people are receiving the vaccine. But not everyone agrees that reopening is safe, partly because the presence of variants that are more contagious, and possibly deadlier, complicate the short-term outlook.”

Washington Post: Manhattan district attorney to release years of racial data as part of nationwide accountability push

Washington Post: Manhattan district attorney to release years of racial data as part of nationwide accountability push. “The Manhattan District Attorney’s Office on Thursday will grant the public access to more than seven years worth of racial data that the top prosecutor here says has informed his approach to criminal justice reform. The database will include race and gender information related to charging decisions, plea-deal offers, bail amounts and sentencing.”

Laughing Squid: Images of New Yorkers Lost to COVID-19 Projected Onto the Brooklyn Bridge in a Moving Tribute

Laughing Squid: Images of New Yorkers Lost to COVID-19 Projected Onto the Brooklyn Bridge in a Moving Tribute. “COVID Day of Remembrance, a moving tribute to the 30,258 New Yorkers who died from COVID-19, took place on March 14, 2021. This date marked the tragic anniversary of the first New York City death due to this horrific pandemic. To remember those whom the city has lost forever, images of COVID victims were projected onto the Brooklyn Bridge.”

Gothamist: NYPD Rejects City Council Request To Release More Internal Misconduct Records

Gothamist: NYPD Rejects City Council Request To Release More Internal Misconduct Records. “Over the last several months, the NYPD has insisted that it is working to increase transparency and accountability ahead of an April 1st state deadline for police reforms. But at a City Council hearing on Tuesday, the NYPD’s leadership declined to publish more comprehensive data on police misconduct investigations.”

Gothamist: NYC Public Schools With The Worst Attendance Are In Areas With Higher COVID Rates

Gothamist: NYC Public Schools With The Worst Attendance Are In Areas With Higher COVID Rates. “New data shows that nearly half of New York City public schools have had attendance rates during the COVID-19 crisis that fall below what’s considered acceptable by education experts. In dozens of schools, serving thousands of students, the median attendance rate is alarmingly low, at less than 61%. And the majority of the schools with a high number of absences are located in Black and brown communities hit hardest by the pandemic, exacerbating an already stark disparity, in not only health but also education.”

AP: After long pandemic year, a changed New York shows renewal

AP: After long pandemic year, a changed New York shows renewal. “It’s still quiet, borderline moribund, in some neighborhoods, especially tourist-dependent locales in midtown Manhattan and in the financial district, where companies have made a wholesale shift to remote work. For-lease signs and boarded-up storefronts scar commercial strips all over the five boroughs. But New York is no ‘ghost town,’ as former President Donald Trump called it in October.”

A ‘daunting, dark and difficult’ time: How a Brooklyn school moved forward after losing its leader to COVID (Chalkbeat)

Chalkbeat: A ‘daunting, dark and difficult’ time: How a Brooklyn school moved forward after losing its leader to COVID. “For many students at the school, [Dez-Ann] Romain was the first educator they felt they could trust, and she deployed a mix of support and tough love. One former student said she counseled him after he broke down in tears over a failed Regents exit exam and let him walk at graduation anyway. (He eventually passed the exam.) Sometimes, she challenged basketball players to pushups if they were goofing around in the hallway instead of heading to class, Musole said. But just days after city officials shuttered school buildings citywide in March due to surging coronavirus infections, Brooklyn Democracy Academy suffered a devastating blow: Romain was dead.”

We Remember: New Yorkers share stories of loss, light, and love during the COVID pandemic (6SqFt)

6SqFt: We Remember: New Yorkers share stories of loss, light, and love during the COVID pandemic. “This Sunday, the city will mark March 14–one year since NYC lost its first resident to the virus–with an official day of remembrance for the nearly 30,000 city residents who passed away. For our part, we decided to speak with our fellow New Yorkers and ask who or what they would like to remember on this somber anniversary. It might be someone they’ve lost, someone who did something heroic, or a larger group or event that played a role. And with these raw stories, we think we can describe this year, through all the feelings that can never be put into words.” Heartwarming and agonizing. I cried a lot.

“I Was The One Who Broke Broadway”: Meet The First Usher To Test Positive For COVID (BuzzFeed News)

BuzzFeed News: “I Was The One Who Broke Broadway”: Meet The First Usher To Test Positive For COVID. “On March 11, 2020, the lights of Broadway in New York City were still shining bright. But as curtains rose in theaters around Times Square, one member of the Broadway community, an usher and aspiring actor named Peter McIntosh, was lying in a hospital bed, just hours after arriving with a positive diagnosis he’d received that day for COVID-19.”

‘My Turn to Get Robbed’: Delivery Workers Are Targets in the Pandemic (New York Times)

New York Times: ‘My Turn to Get Robbed’: Delivery Workers Are Targets in the Pandemic. “Manuel Perez-Saucedo was making his last food delivery of the day in Brooklyn one evening last fall when two men on a motorcycle trailed him for several blocks and then passed him. But when he stopped his electric bicycle outside his destination on a dark street minutes later, the men emerged from the shadows. One had a pistol.”