New York Times: Gail Slatter, Who Helped Make the Times Newsroom Run, Dies at 68

New York Times: Gail Slatter, Who Helped Make the Times Newsroom Run, Dies at 68. “Gail Slatter never received a byline or a photo credit in The New York Times. During the 40 years she worked there, her name appeared in the newspaper only once, in 1997, when she helped flesh out a profile of a 15-year-old murder suspect who happened to have been on her daughter’s swim team at a Y.M.C.A. on Manhattan’s West Side. Ms. Slatter was a news assistant at The Times. But her unassuming job title belied the significant impact she had on what appeared in the paper and on the daily lives of her colleagues, particularly on the culture and photo desks. She was a guide, gatekeeper and guardian.”

NiemanLab: The New York Times is so done with its 77,000-member Facebook cooking group. What happens now?

NiemanLab: The New York Times is so done with its 77,000-member Facebook cooking group. What happens now?. “Members are speculating: Why would The New York Times want to abandon its 77,000-member cooking Facebook group? The one whose demise I surely ensured by reporting, upon its launch two years ago, that it was a ‘happy corner of the internet’? A place where, as one Times social media editor put it at the time, ‘everyone’s so nice to each other, and so encouraging, it feels like one long episode of “The Great British Baking Show,” 24 hours a day’? A lot can change in two years.”

BuzzFeed News: NYT Columnist David Brooks Resigns From Nonprofit After More Evidence Of Conflicts Emerges

BuzzFeed News: NYT Columnist David Brooks Resigns From Nonprofit After More Evidence Of Conflicts Emerges. “BuzzFeed News first revealed Brooks never disclosed to Times readers that he takes a full-time salary for his work on Weave, or that its funders include Facebook, the father of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos, and other wealthy individuals and corporations. Brooks recently wrote a blog post for Facebook’s corporate website in praise of Facebook Groups, a product that has often been a fount of misinformation and hate speech.”

TechCrunch: The New York Times launches an AR-enabled crossword on Instagram

TechCrunch: The New York Times launches an AR-enabled crossword on Instagram. “The New York Times is bringing its signature crosswords game into augmented reality. The media company announced this morning it’s launching a new AR-enabled game, ‘Shattered Crosswords,’ on Instagram, where players will be able to solve clues by finding spinning broken crossword pieces in AR. When the right vantage point is achieved, players will find the words hidden among the shards above the puzzle.”

New York Times: America Is Letting the Coronavirus Rage Through Prisons

New York Times: America Is Letting the Coronavirus Rage Through Prisons. “Like the nation overall, U.S. correctional facilities are experiencing record spikes in coronavirus infections this fall. During the week of Nov. 17, there were 13,657 new coronavirus infections reported across the state and federal prison systems, according to the Marshall Project, which has been tracking these numbers since March. The previous week saw 13,676 new cases. These are by far the highest weekly tolls reported since the pandemic began. With winter descending, the situation threatens to grow bleaker still.”

New York Times: The New York Times is available to high school students and teachers across the United States — free.

New York Times: The New York Times is available to high school students and teachers across the United States — free.. “The mission of The New York Times — to seek the truth and help people understand the world — is critically important in this moment of upheaval. And as students and teachers head into an unprecedented school year, it’s essential that they have access to information that helps them understand what’s happening. That’s why The Times is working with Verizon to provide high school students and teachers with a free digital subscription through September 1, 2021 — helping them stay connected to the world, even as it continues to change.”

NiemanLab: The New York Times will flag viral misinformation with a new Daily Distortions feature

NiemanLab: The New York Times will flag viral misinformation with a new Daily Distortions feature. “Daily Distortions will appear as a swipeable feature for mobile apps focused on one subject per day and a running blog with a wider selection of the misinformation being tracked by Times journalists. The information will be presented in a ‘compelling, predictable way’ and each edition is designed to be shareable. (A print version of the feature is in the works, too.)”

The Ringer: One Twitter Account’s Quest to Proofread The New York Times

The Ringer: One Twitter Account’s Quest to Proofread The New York Times. “On October 18, 2019, a New York Times standards editor emailed seven other Times editors to alert them to the existence of a new Twitter account that they would soon grow to respect—and, at times, resent. According to the characterization of one of the editors on the email, the message advised its recipients ‘that there was a lawyer on Twitter aggressively pointing out typos, and that we should consider following him.’ A little more than a month after the Twitter account’s creation on September 16, The New York Times had taken note of @nyttypos, or Typos of the New York Times.”

New York Times: Manhattan Faces a Reckoning if Working From Home Becomes the Norm

New York Times: Manhattan Faces a Reckoning if Working From Home Becomes the Norm. “Before the coronavirus crisis, three of New York City’s largest commercial tenants — Barclays, JP Morgan Chase and Morgan Stanley — had tens of thousands of workers in towers across Manhattan. Now, as the city wrestles with when and how to reopen, executives at all three firms have decided that it is highly unlikely that all their workers will ever return to those buildings.”

Google Blog: Go beyond the page with Google Lens and NYT Magazine

Google Blog: Go beyond the page with Google Lens and NYT Magazine. “Throughout the first half of this year, we’re working with The New York Times so that readers of the print edition of The New York Times Magazine can use Google Lens to unlock more information by simply pointing their smartphone camera at the pages. On Sunday, when The Times Magazine’s annual Music Issue hits newsstands, readers can use Lens to access videos, animations and in-depth digital content that help you go beyond what’s included in print. Readers will also be able to access a playlist of all the music on the magazine’s list of ’25 Songs That Matter Now’ using Lens.”

A Good Place: The Only Good Comments Section On The Internet (The Outline)

The Outline: A Good Place: The Only Good Comments Section On The Internet. “No matter where the comments live these days, it’s almost impossible to find a comments section where the unsolicited opinions that live there are actually positive, let alone helpful. Unless we’re talking about the comments on NYT Cooking, a digital collection of recipes from The New York Times.”

Engadget: Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times team up to fight digital fakes

Engadget: Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times team up to fight digital fakes. “Adobe, Twitter and the New York Times are tired of seeing fake media propagate, and they’re teaming up to do something about it. The trio has launched a Content Authenticity Initiative that aims to create a standard for digital media attribution. Ideally, you’d know whether or not a picture or video is legitimate simply by examining the file — you’d know if it had been manipulated.”

New York Times: John Rothman, Who Made The Times’s Archives Accessible, Dies at 95

New York Times: John Rothman, Who Made The Times’s Archives Accessible, Dies at 95. “John Rothman, who in an era before Google conceived and helped develop The New York Times Information Bank, a revolutionary system that let computer users easily find journalism by The Times and dozens of other publications, died on Thursday in Manhattan. He was 95.”

The Daily Beast: The New York Times Is Out to Make Its Obituaries Less White and Less Male

The Daily Beast: The New York Times Is Out to Make Its Obituaries Less White and Less Male. “In recent months, the newspaper has been quietly deploying a statistical demographic tool to help assure that at least 30 percent of its obituaries feature women, with ambitions to raise the obit percentage for racial and sexual- and gender-identity minorities as well.”