CNET: More than a month later, Facebook, Instagram host New Zealand shooting videos

CNET: More than a month later, Facebook, Instagram host New Zealand shooting videos. “It’s been over a month since a gunman opened fire at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, killing 50 people and livestreaming the massacre on Facebook. It appears the social network, as well as Facebook-owned Instagram, is still showing videos of the attack, according to a Friday report by Motherboard.”

Mother Jones: Anti-Muslim Hate Has Been Rampant on Reddit Since the New Zealand Shooting

Mother Jones: Anti-Muslim Hate Has Been Rampant on Reddit Since the New Zealand Shooting. “Days after the tragic shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand, Reddit remains a home for the exact type of white supremacist and Islamaphobic hate that the killer used to rationalize his massacre.”

CNET: Facebook, YouTube called to meet lawmakers about New Zealand shooting video

CNET: Facebook, YouTube called to meet lawmakers about New Zealand shooting video. “The US House Homeland Security Committee is asking CEOs from Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and Microsoft to prioritize the quick removal of violent terrorist content following posts about the New Zealand mosque shooting last week.”

The Spinoff NZ: The quiet deletion of the Islamophobic archives

The Spinoff NZ: The quiet deletion of the Islamophobic archives. “In the wake of the Christchurch terror attack, organisations around New Zealand have removed content which might be seen as part of the culture which mainstreamed and enabled Islamophobia and anti-immigrant sentiment. These range from promoters to media outlets to political parties, though few are drawing attention to what they have removed or publicly stating their motivations. However others which have long-harboured or propagated Islamophobic views have opted to leave them on their platforms.”

The Atlantic: Social Media Are a Mass Shooter’s Best Friend

The Atlantic: Social Media Are a Mass Shooter’s Best Friend. “A terrorist attack in New Zealand cast new blame on how technology platforms police content. But global internet services were designed to work this way, and there might be no escape from their grip.”