Hyperallergic: Newly Digitized Collection of Early 20th-Century Lakota Drawings Tells a Curious History

Hyperallergic: Newly Digitized Collection of Early 20th-Century Lakota Drawings Tells a Curious History. “In 1922, the Newberry Library acquired this collection of 160 drawings, attributed to ‘Sioux Indians’ living in Fort Yates, which serves as headquarters of the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. The three boxes of art were sold by one Aaron McGaffey Beede, an Episcopal missionary who had provided paper and art supplies to the residents he had come to know, and paid them small sums to purchase the resulting works. This strange exchange arose from a dire situation: in the winter of 1913-14, the Lakota faced starvation from failed crops and a mysterious disappearance of cattle. These drawings, for them, carried exceptional value linked to survival; today, they represent significant records of indigenous self-representation as well as cross-cultural exchange.”

Newberry: With New Open Access Policy, the Newberry’s Digital Collections Are Now Available for Re-use without Licensing or Permission Fees

A tip o’ the nib to Sarah CS! From the Newberry: With New Open Access Policy, the Newberry’s Digital Collections Are Now Available for Re-use without Licensing or Permission Fees. “The Newberry has announced a major revision to its policy regarding the re-use of collection images: images derived from collection items are now available to anyone for any lawful purpose, whether commercial or non-commercial, without licensing or permission fees to the library. Applying to everything from the pictures researchers take in the library’s reading rooms to the 1.7 million high-resolution Newberry images currently available online, the revised policy is intended to encourage users to interact more freely with collection items as they produce new scholarly and creative work.” As the press release notes, it is still your responsibility to determine whether an item might have other permission requirements associated with it.

Age of Revolutions: Digitization Is The Order Of The Day At The Newberry Library (French Revolution)

Age of Revolutions: Digitization Is The Order Of The Day At The Newberry Library. “Published between 1780 and 1810, the 30,000+ pamphlets of Voices of the Revolution represent an unparalleled corpus of material charting the political, social, and religious history of the French Revolution. For the project, two Newberry collections, the French Revolution Collection and the Louis XVI Trial and Execution Collection, have been digitized in their entirety. The pamphlets are of particular interest to scholars of the French Revolution, but their value is not limited to specialists of French or European history.”

Smithsonian Magazine: Chicago Library Seeks Help Transcribing Magical Manuscripts

Smithsonian Magazine: Chicago Library Seeks Help Transcribing Magical Manuscripts. “The Newberry Library in Chicago is home to some 80,000 documents pertaining to religion during the early modern period, a time of sweeping social, political, and cultural change spanning the late Middle Ages to the start of the Industrial Revolution. Among the library’s collection of rare Bibles and Christian devotional texts are a series of manuscripts that would have scandalized the religious establishment. These texts deal with magic—from casting charms to conjuring spirits—and the Newberry is asking for help translating and transcribing them.”

The Newberry: Announcing “Religious Change, 1450 – 1700”

From The Newberry: Announcing “Religious Change, 1450 – 1700”. “The Newberry announces the public launch of Religious Change, 1450 – 1700, a multidisciplinary project drawing on the full range of the library’s programs, services, and staff expertise. Coinciding with the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s 95 Theses, Religious Change will explore how challenges to religious authority ushered in an age of hope, fear, and anxiety that continues to shape religion, politics, culture, and every other facet of human life. We will pursue this theme through an array of public programs and digital resources, as well as an exhibition opening in September. “