The Globe and Mail: News Corp. launches news aggregation site Knewz to counter Facebook, Google

The Globe and Mail: News Corp. launches news aggregation site Knewz to counter Facebook, Google. “News Corp on Wednesday launched a free news aggregation service, Knewz, to address its long-held criticism of how Google and Facebook treat publishers and journalists. The service uses artificial intelligence to scan more than 400 national and local news sources across the political spectrum – including Mother Jones, Washington Examiner, and The Nation – and relies on a small team of editors and technical staff to curate articles.” Haven’t looked at it yet. Are y’all interested in a deep dive?

Phys .org: News aggregator websites play critical role in driving readers to media outlet websites

Phys .org: News aggregator websites play critical role in driving readers to media outlet websites. “News aggregators help to simplify consumers’ search for news stories by gathering content based on viewing history or other factors. Commonly used aggregators include Google News, Yahoo! News, and others. They offer links to news stories published by news outlets and save consumers considerable time and effort in finding news. New research in the INFORMS journal Marketing Science examined the relationship between the two, specifically data compiled after the shutdown of ‘Google News’ in Spain in December 2014.”

Nieman Lab: That Chinese news aggregation app that’s been driving a ton of traffic might become an American news aggregator app

Nieman Lab: That Chinese news aggregation app that’s been driving a ton of traffic might become an American news aggregator app. “If you’re the kind of person who follows trends in news aggregator apps — and hey, you’re reading Nieman Lab, it’s a reasonable possibility — you may have noticed the growing buzz around a mobile app called, well, TopBuzz. It’s based in China, owned by ByteDance, the same company that hooked your niece and nephew on TikTok.”

Meduza: How the Russian authorities forced the country’s top news aggregator to purge unwanted stories

Meduza: How the Russian authorities forced the country’s top news aggregator to purge unwanted stories. “On August 15, 2019, top lawmakers in Russia’s State Duma said they will consider new legislation that would restrict foreign citizens’ right to own major Russian websites. The announcement came after an inaccurate story (about Russia possibly banning the sale of some older cars) reached the top of Yandex’s news aggregator.”

The Drum: With Zuckerberg on the ropes, Yahoo aims to displace social media as a home for news

The Drum: With Zuckerberg on the ropes, Yahoo aims to displace social media as a home for news. “With social media platforms suffering a new crisis in trust, and accusations that their algorithms create an echo chamber of similar political views, Yahoo is looking to grow its reach by appealing to users who seek a diversity of news sources in one place. It plans to expand its news gathering operation and extend its network of publishing partners. Having so far had a heavy reliance on desktop traffic, Yahoo News hopes that under the ownership of Verizon it can increase its presence on mobile, with its strategy based on apps specialising in news, finance and sports.” This is not a terrible strategy. It would be even better if Yahoo polished up its search tools a bit and dedicated itself to source transparency unlike some other news aggregators..

The Next Web: Detective by Charlie is an AI tool that’s like having your own personal CIA

Whoa! From The Next Web: Detective by Charlie is an AI tool that’s like having your own personal CIA. “Imagine having a button that can instantly tell you (virtually) everything there is to know about something or someone. That, in a nutshell, is Detective by Charlie, which uses natural language processing (NLP) and AI to unearth and collate information about a particular subject in a couple of seconds.” Obviously not free. I don’t think I could even afford to try it.

CNET: Google News facelift focuses on showing you the facts

CNET: Google News facelift focuses on showing you the facts. “Google News got a redesign this week that’s more about facts than fonts. As with any redesign, the aim is to present a cleaner, uncluttered page that makes content easier to find and digest. The desktop News page has adopted a card format intended to help you browse for stories, which will generally be labeled with publisher names and tags such as Local Source, Most Referenced or Opinion to provide more context about the issues represented.”

EU Considering Copyright Reform Which Will Impact News Aggregators

The EU is calling for copyright reform that could have far-reaching consequences. “Copyright law already provides reporters with protection for the news stories they publish, but in a draft directive published Wednesday the European Commission wants to create an additional, related right giving newspapers more powers to make news aggregators pay for using snippets consisting of, say, the headline and a sentence or two of each story.” Like this, maybe.