Axios: Social media news consumption slows globally

Axios: Social media news consumption slows globally. “Social media has shrunk as a source for news, mostly due to Facebook’s global pullback from news. Why it matters: Growth in news consumption on vertical video platforms like TikTok and Instagram has not grown fast enough to offset the reduction in news consumption on Facebook globally.”

NiemanLab: Seeing stories of kindness may counteract the negative effects of consuming bad news

NiemanLab: Seeing stories of kindness may counteract the negative effects of consuming bad news. “During the pandemic, multiple studies linked news consumption to poorer mental health, documenting symptoms of depression, anxiety, hopelessness and worry. In our research, we found that spending as little as 2-4 minutes on Twitter or YouTube reading about the pandemic affected people’s moods adversely. However, our latest study has found that looking at positive news stories — specifically, videos and articles featuring acts of kindness — can actually counteract the ill-effects of seeing negative news stories.”

Associated Press: Betting on social media as a news destination for the young

Associated Press: Betting on social media as a news destination for the young. “If young people are spending so much time on social media, it stands to reason that’s a good place to reach them with news. Operators of the News Movement are betting their business on that hunch. The company, which has been operating for more than a year, hopes to succeed despite journalism being littered with years of unsuccessful attempts to entice people in their 20s to become news consumers.”

Nieman Journalism Lab: TikTok personality journalists continue to rise

Nieman Journalism Lab: TikTok personality journalists continue to rise. “Younger audiences aren’t opening up a physical newspaper or turning on the 7 p.m. news (sorry). They’re scrolling on Twitter, Instagram, or TikTok. And after seeing the success of The Washington Post and Planet Money‘s TikToks, other outlets are going to want in. But it won’t just be brand accounts posting these TikToks — it’ll be reporters using their own accounts to explain their reporting.”

Arizona State University: ‘News addiction’ can cause stress, anxiety, study says

Arizona State University: ‘News addiction’ can cause stress, anxiety, study says. “The obsessive urge to keep up with that news can lead to stress, anxiety and worsening physical health, according to a study in the journal Health Communication. The study found that 16.5% of 1,100 people polled in an online survey showed signs of ‘severely problematic’ news consumption, which led them to focus less on school, work and family, and contributed to an inability to sleep. Just more than 73% said they experienced mental health issues ‘quite a bit’ or ‘very much,’ and 61% reported their physical health suffered.”

NiemanLab: Do browser extensions keep anyone away from fake news sites? Maybe a tiny bit

NiemanLab: Do browser extensions keep anyone away from fake news sites? Maybe a tiny bit. “As more companies and platforms adopt ways to figure out whether fact-checking, flagging questionable content, or some other form of alert works best to dissuade people from consuming misinformation, a new study finds that credibility ratings for news sites may offer a tiny ray of hope — if users actually use them.”

The Conversation: How to protect your family from horrific news images – and still stay informed

The Conversation: How to protect your family from horrific news images – and still stay informed. “I am a trauma psychiatrist and researcher who works with refugees, survivors of torture and human trafficking and first responders. In my work, I hear detailed stories of suffering from my patients that are painful to be privy to and that can have a negative impact on me and my colleagues. Through these experiences and my training, I have learned ways to protect myself from too much emotional impact while staying informed and helping my patients.”

The Conversation: Ukraine doomscrolling can harm your cognition as well as your mood – here’s what to do about it

The Conversation: Ukraine doomscrolling can harm your cognition as well as your mood – here’s what to do about it. “Many people have experienced chronic stress since the pandemic lockdowns. Added to this are the climate crisis, the increasing cost of living and most recently threats to European and global security due to the conflict in Ukraine. To some, it may seem that there is never any good news anymore. This is of course not true, but when we’re doomscrolling – spending an excessive amount of screen time devoted to reading negative news – we can become locked into thinking it is.”

PsyPost: News avoidance during the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with better mental well-being

NOW you tell me. PsyPost: News avoidance during the COVID-19 pandemic is associated with better mental well-being. “At the start of the pandemic, news consumption increased for most participants. Complimenting this increase, participants also turned to a greater variety of news sources. However, after the first few months of the pandemic, news avoidance began to increase. Younger adults were more likely to avoid the news. Feeling emotionally charged, losing trust in news media, feeling overloaded and a need to ignore the news greatly contributed to news avoidance. While people’s general mental well-being did not influence their news consumption habits, those who engaged in more news avoidance had slightly better general mental health.”

Pew: Americans who relied most on Trump for COVID-19 news among least likely to be vaccinated

Pew: Americans who relied most on Trump for COVID-19 news among least likely to be vaccinated. “Americans who relied most on former President Donald Trump and the White House coronavirus task force for COVID-19 news in the early days of the pandemic are now among those least likely to have been vaccinated against the virus, according to a new Pew Research Center survey.”

CNET: Facebook, Twitter still the leading social media sites where people get news

CNET: Facebook, Twitter still the leading social media sites where people get news. “Roughly half of US adults say they get news from social media sites ‘sometimes’ or ‘often,’ according to a new poll from Pew Research Center. Though that number (48%) is slightly lower than it was last year, it could generate concern given social media’s vulnerability to misinformation.”

NiemanLab: How the pandemic (sort of) changed the way we consume news

NiemanLab: How the pandemic (sort of) changed the way we consume news. “From the moment the pandemic hit in full force in March 2020, it was clear that its seemingly all-encompassing magnitude was having a seismic impact on many people’s news consumption habits. Conversations on and offline routinely included discussions of how we were either unplugging from the news or being sucked in more deeply than ever. (Or both!) We even began using a new word — doomscrolling — to capture the mesmerizing continual intake of fear- and despair-inducing news on our devices. The pandemic bores on, but the implications of that initial shift in news consumption remain cloudy. ”