NewsTalk: ‘Social media overload’ makes people more likely to believe COVID-19 misinformation, study finds

NewsTalk: ‘Social media overload’ makes people more likely to believe COVID-19 misinformation, study finds. “Researchers in NUI Galway and the University of Turku in Finland say that when people search through too much content, it impairs their ability to critically assess if the information is true. They’re also then more likely to share that content throughout their social network, which in turn amplifies the misinformation problem.”

New York Times: Where Westchester Teens Get Their Coronavirus News

New York Times: Where Westchester Teens Get Their Coronavirus News. “‘Westchester memes is how people know what’s going on,’ Quinn Muller said. She’s 14 and lives in Sleepy Hollow, in Westchester County. She, and many of her peers in towns just north of New York City, are using local meme pages as their news source for updates about the new coronavirus.”

EurekAlert: Vaccine misinformation and social media

EurekAlert: Vaccine misinformation and social media. “People who rely on social media for information were more likely to be misinformed about vaccines than those who rely on traditional media, according to a study of vaccine knowledge and media use by researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania.”

EurekAlert: Study shows social media and search engines are better than their reputation suggests

EurekAlert: Study shows social media and search engines are better than their reputation suggests. “Based on an innovative analysis of the web browsing behavior of more than 5,000 German Internet users, the results show that the use of intermediaries such as Facebook, Twitter, Google, or portals like GMX actually results in more visits to news sites and a greater variety of news sites visited. This runs counter to what has been postulated to date.”

Nieman Lab: News portals like Yahoo still bring Democrats and Republicans together for political news, but they’re fading fast

Nieman Lab: News portals like Yahoo still bring Democrats and Republicans together for political news, but they’re fading fast. “‘We observe segregation in political news consumption.’ In this working paper, ‘Partisan Enclaves and Information Bazaars: Mapping Selective Exposure to Online News,’ Stanford researchers examined a ‘data set of web browsing behavior collected during the 2016 U.S. presidential election’ to see how Democrats and Republicans seek out news sources and how they change their news consumption levels in response to different political events. (The data set is from YouGov and was also used in this paper.)”

7 Top News Apps for Free: Google News, Flipboard, Feedly, and More (MakeUseOf)

MakeUseOf: 7 Top News Apps for Free: Google News, Flipboard, Feedly, and More. “For a lot of people, news consumption has shifted from websites and newspapers to aggregator apps on smartphones. But finding the right one is surprisingly still quite a challenging process. When picking the best news app, you need to look out for a lot of features, including smart algorithms, dark themes, offloading options, and more. We’ve rounded up the best seven news apps for Android and iPhone you should try.” I still miss Undrip.

Pew: Social media outpaces print newspapers in the U.S. as a news source

Pew (PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW PEW!): Social media outpaces print newspapers in the U.S. as a news source . “Social media sites have surpassed print newspapers as a news source for Americans: One-in-five U.S. adults say they often get news via social media, slightly higher than the share who often do so from print newspapers (16%) for the first time since Pew Research Center began asking these questions. In 2017, the portion who got news via social media was about equal to the portion who got news from print newspapers.”