Poynter: How the AP Stylebook has kept up with the pandemic

Poynter: How the AP Stylebook has kept up with the pandemic. “The pandemic gave us a new vocabulary to describe everyday life — Zoom, anyone? — and editors at the Associated Press Stylebook have been working to keep up. AP first published its coronavirus topical guide last March and has since updated it ‘five or six’ times in the past year, AP Stylebook editor Paula Froke said. The current version, published March 10, contains 74 entries, 43 of which are new to the stylebook.”

NBC News: In a Pennsylvania town, a Facebook group fills the local news void

NBC News: In a Pennsylvania town, a Facebook group fills the local news void. “…the question of just who is accountable for providing information in Beaver County is murky. The area’s once-trusted news source, a newspaper with a 160-year history, was devastated in a few short months after it was swallowed up by giant corporate chains. The vacuum was filled by social media, namely Facebook.”

CNET: Facebook could block news in Canada like it did in Australia

CNET: Facebook could block news in Canada like it did in Australia. “In the middle of February, as the Australian government was passing a bill that would force Google and Facebook to pay publishers for news that surfaces on their platforms, Australia’s 16 million users found that news content had vanished from Facebook’s website and app. Now, with Canada’s government mulling similar legislation, it’s possible the story could repeat itself across the Pacific.”

Reuters: Google signs deals with Italian publishers for content on News Showcase

Reuters: Google signs deals with Italian publishers for content on News Showcase. “Alphabet Inc’s Google said on Wednesday it had sealed agreements with various Italian publishers to offer access to some of their content on the U.S. tech giant’s Showcase news platform. Google News Showcase is a global vehicle to pay news publishers for their content online and a new service that would allow partnering publishers to curate content and provide limited access to paywalled stories for users.”

Introducing The Collective: A newsletter for passing the mic on the path to equity (Poynter)

Poynter: Introducing The Collective: A newsletter for passing the mic on the path to equity. “As we approach the first anniversary of the racial reckoning in America’s newsrooms, the unique challenges of being a journalist of color continue. And who understands what we’re going through better than someone who has been through it themselves? That’s why we’re excited to launch The Collective, a newsletter that will come out on the last Wednesday of the month starting in April. We’re looking for fresh voices to elevate.”

NiemanLab: California State University’s student journalists launched a wire service to share their work with each other. Here’s how they did it.

NiemanLab: California State University’s student journalists launched a wire service to share their work with each other. Here’s how they did it.. “Cal State Student Newswire launched in March 2020 as a wire service for student publications in the California State University system. Over the last year, it’s evolved from a wire service to an experimental, collaborative initiative to produce journalism across all CSUs.”

Google Blog: These global projects expand the reach of fact-checks

Google Blog: These global projects expand the reach of fact-checks. “Journalists can play a fundamental role supporting an evidence-based discourse by listening to their audiences’ concerns and providing corrective information about misconceptions that circulate online and offline. To support this work, the Google News Initiative launched a $3 million Open Fund in January. Over a three-week window, we received more than 309 applications from 74 countries. Today, we are announcing the 11 projects that were selected through an extensive review process that included a 17-person project team and an expert jury reviewing the highest-scoring applicants.”

Brookings Institution: Lessons for online platform regulation from Australia vs. Facebook

Brookings Institution: Lessons for online platform regulation from Australia vs. Facebook. “To be clear, the Australian approach is a limited way to deal with tech monopoly power and the crisis in news production. It does not stop Facebook from dropping news sources again if it does not like the arbitrator’s commercial arrangements. Moreover, as media scholar and others have pointed out, public funds and infrastructure for local journalism will be needed in addition to subsidizing established national news outlets. But the Australian approach is a start.”

NiemanLab: How Yahoo News reached 1 million followers on TikTok in 1 year

NiemanLab: How Yahoo News reached 1 million followers on TikTok in 1 year. “Picture Yahoo users and you probably envision a group that’s older and a bit less digitally savvy than those relying on, say, Google’s suite. (The research says you’re not wrong.) On TikTok, in contrast, 63% of users are younger than 30 — including 33% still in their teens. So you might be thinking: Yahoo News? On TikTok?”

WSMV: New search engine featuring black authors

WSMV: New search engine featuring black authors. “‘I started having a lot of conversations, especially during the lockdown, with some of my friends just trying to understand, “where were melinnial BIPOC youth and young adults getting their news from,”‘ said Dr. Paul McNeil of MB Usable Security LLC. McNeil found many were missing the black perspective. So he created ‘BLAAGLE,’ a search engine he designed where he’s indexing articles specifically written by black journalists and bloggers.” It appears that the site is currently in closed beta, but you can apply for access.

NiemanLab: Young Americans are more likely to understand how news works on Google and Facebook

NiemanLab: Young Americans are more likely to understand how news works on Google and Facebook. “A new study by the Center for Media Engagement at the University of Texas, Austin, shows that the American public is largely informed about how platforms like Facebook and Google work to varying degrees, but gaps exists depending on demographic, political, and platform use differences.”

Poynter: After a devastating and deadly pandemic, how do we recover the news?

Poynter: After a devastating and deadly pandemic, how do we recover the news?. “Our work this year is making sense of what’s happened and tracking what must still happen for local news. We’re calling this work “Recovering The News,” and we plan to tell what recovery means in several ways beginning today with an oral history project featuring nearly 30 local newsrooms and press associations in mid-America. That project, The Essential Workers, comes from Teri Finneman and William Mari, two journalism professors who spent last year capturing history as it happened.”