SEO Roundtable: Google Wants To Get Date Timestamps Accurate In Search Results

SEO Roundtable: Google Wants To Get Date Timestamps Accurate In Search Results. “Last night, when people were searching about the horrible news in Florida, some noticed that some of the recent articles covering the news were labeled by Google has being written days before the event. Obviously, something that happened hours ago, written potentially minutes ago, should not be labeled in the Google search results as being written 2 or 3 days ago. Danny Sullivan at Google was doing some damage control for Google explaining that sometimes getting the date right, can be hard.” I’m really glad someone is working on this, as it’s been a problem for a LONG time. It’s not just Google either – look at RSS feeds for Bing News search results.

BuzzFeed: Twitter Says Impersonating A Journalist During A Mass Shooting Doesn’t Violate Its Rules

BuzzFeed: Twitter Says Impersonating A Journalist During A Mass Shooting Doesn’t Violate Its Rules. “In the wake of the Florida high school shooting Wednesday, Twitter users began spreading doctored tweets targeting Miami Herald reporter Alex Harris. The shooting Wednesday left at least 17 dead. After the shooter entered the school and began the attack, some students posted on Snapchat and Twitter about what was happening. Harris was one of the first reporters to reach out to the students to help explain the situation. As the tweet went viral, Harris began getting harassment.”

BuzzFeed: Twitter’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Live Stream Was Part Of A New Initiative

BuzzFeed: Twitter’s Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School Live Stream Was Part Of A New Initiative. “Twitter is starting to show live, local news broadcasts in a live streaming window next to its timeline during major breaking news events. Twitter’s initiative to air these videos is currently rolled out across the platform, a company spokesperson confirmed to BuzzFeed News. The company will rely on a set of partnerships with local news stations to select the footage.”

Times of Malta: Malta company registry data to be revealed by ICIJ

Times of Malta: Malta company registry data to be revealed by ICIJ. “The International Consortium of Investigative Journalists will add data from Malta’s corporate registry to their offshore leaks database on Wednesday. Although the Malta Financial Services Authority runs its own searchable database, which is available upon registration, it does not allow for specific searches of company directors and shareholders.”

Wired: Inside The Two Years That Shook Facebook—and The World

Wired: Inside The Two Years That Shook Facebook—and The World. “[Benjamin] Fearnow, a recent graduate of the Columbia Journalism School, worked in Facebook’s New York office on something called Trending Topics, a feed of popular news subjects that popped up when people opened Facebook. The feed was generated by an algorithm but moderated by a team of about 25 people with backgrounds in journalism. If the word ‘Trump’ was trending, as it often was, they used their news judgment to identify which bit of news about the candidate was most important. If The Onion or a hoax site published a spoof that went viral, they had to keep that out. If something like a mass shooting happened, and Facebook’s algorithm was slow to pick up on it, they would inject a story about it into the feed.”

Quartz: Facebook “likes” are a powerful tool for authoritarian rulers, court petition says

Quartz: Facebook “likes” are a powerful tool for authoritarian rulers, court petition says. “A Cambodian opposition leader has filed a petition in a California court against Facebook, demanding the company disclose its transactions with his country’s authoritarian prime minister, whom he accuses of falsely inflating his popularity through purchased ‘likes’ and spreading fake news.”

Bellingcat: Dutch Police Social Media Activity Raise Privacy Concerns

Bellingcat: Dutch Police Social Media Activity Raise Privacy Concerns. “Following a Bellingcat workshop, a group of investigative journalists from the Dutch public broadcaster KRO-NCRV spent the last six months investigating social media platforms used by the Dutch National Police Force. After analyzing data and footage from YouTube videos, tweets, Facebook and Instagram posts, we reached the following conclusion: Dutch police are sometimes careless with the privacy of victims or suspects. Thomas Mulder, one of the journalists, explains how they conducted their investigation.”