Google Blog: Make your own data gifs with our new too [probably “tool”]

Google Blog: Make your own data gifs with our new too. Yes, it says “too”. I’m sure it’s a typo and “tool” was meant. “Data visualizations are an essential storytelling tool in journalism, and though they are often intricate, they don’t have to be complex. In fact, with the growth of mobile devices as a primary method of consuming news, data visualizations can be simple images formatted for the device they appear on. Enter data gifs.”

Columbia Journalism Review: Social media fills vacuum left by China’s ‘hollowed out’ press

Columbia Journalism Review: Social media fills vacuum left by China’s ‘hollowed out’ press. “China… was recently ranked the fifth-worst country in Reporters without Borders’ annual press freedom index. That’s largely thanks to President Xi Jinping, whose clampdown on free speech has included increased restrictions on domestic media, stepped-up censorship across the board, and draconian punishments for anyone—journalist or civilian—who steps out of line….But for all Xi’s efforts, there’s one variable that could thwart his careful calculations: social media, which, in the vacuum left by China’s decimated press, has created surprising openings for debate, foreign influence, and even citizen reporting.” Excellent article. Please read.

Phys.org: Study suggests people less likely to fact check news when in company of other people

Phys.org: Study suggests people less likely to fact check news when in company of other people. “In practice, it should be easy to avoid falling prey to fake news—upon reading something that may not sound right, all a person has to do is type a few words and run a Google search. But people do not always behave in logical ways. In this new effort, the research trio sought to better understand fact checking by conducting eight experiments designed to determine under which circumstances people are more or less likely to fact check a news article they have just read. The researchers enlisted the assistance of 200 people, all near 36 years old. In the experiments, the volunteers were asked to read a news article and then to perform some tasks related to their feelings regarding the accuracy of the article.”

Armenia News Agency Getting Digital Archive For Its Photos

Armenia news agency ARMENPRESS is getting a digital archive for its photos. “ARMENPRESS news agency, Beeline Armenia and the Technological Development Center Fund are announcing the launch of the ARMENPRESS: History project. The purpose of the project is to digitize the news agency’s unique photo archive: nearly 10,000 photos from the archive, and create the ARMENPRESS: History website.”

Poynter: Facebook is testing products to connect its users to local news

Poynter: Facebook is testing products to connect its users to local news. “As part of its ongoing push to build relationships with local publishers, Facebook is testing products that can help people better connect with local news. Those tests, part of the Facebook Journalism Project, have just begun, but they’re all aimed at helping people discover and engage with news outlets in their communities, a Facebook spokesperson told Poynter.”

The Register: Kill Google AMP before it KILLS the web

The Register: Kill Google AMP before it KILLS the web. “Quite a few high-profile web developers have this year weighted in with criticism and some, following a Google conference dedicated to AMP, have cautioned users about diving in with both feet. These, in my view, don’t go far enough in stating the problem and I feel this needs to be said very clearly: Google’s AMP is bad – bad in a potentially web-destroying way. Google AMP is bad news for how the web is built, it’s bad news for publishers of credible online content, and it’s bad news for consumers of that content. Google AMP is only good for one party: Google. Google, and possibly, purveyors of fake news.”