The Guardian: Uncovered: reality of how smartphones turned election news into chaos

The Guardian: Uncovered: reality of how smartphones turned election news into chaos. “Ask the average 2019 voter where the problems with political news lie, and you might hear a few familiar claims: fake news. Russian interference. The biased BBC. But take a look at their smartphones, and you might discover a different, more chaotic world – in which news is being shaped less by publishers or foreign agents but by social media algorithms and friendship groups.”

Journalism .co .uk: LA Times posts historic images on a new Instagram account to engage younger news audience

Journalism .co .uk: LA Times posts historic images on a new Instagram account to engage younger news audience. “The US publisher is the largest and one of the oldest local newspapers in the country. To attract the audiences of tomorrow, it set up a new @latimesarchives Instagram account in October 2019, which posts archived black-and-white photos through the ages of the organisation.”

Shouting into the void: what can fact-checkers actually do to avoid it? (Poynter)

Poynter: Shouting into the void: what can fact-checkers actually do to avoid it?. “I came into Full Fact, as an IFCN’s fellow, to answer three broad questions: What makes fact-checking work? Is PesaCheck fact-checking effectively? What could be done to increase the impact of PesaCheck fact-checks? These are broad in focus so I broke them down into trying to figure out the actual steps to take pre and post-publication as we try to define the type of impact we want our fact-checking to have. So, what did I find out?”

New York Times: These Reporters Rely on Public Data, Rather Than Secret Sources

New York Times: These Reporters Rely on Public Data, Rather Than Secret Sources. “The craft of building a story on publicly available data was part of journalism in the analog era, but it has come of age in recent years, with the ubiquity of smartphones and the expansion of social media.”

BBC: Sham news sites make big bucks from fake views

BBC: Sham news sites make big bucks from fake views. “There are 350 million registered domain names on the internet. Experts say it’s impossible to count how many are sham news sites. But just like legitimate websites, they earn money from the major tech companies that pay them to display ads.”

“We’re wounded animals and wondering if they’re going to shoot us”: Publishers have, um, cooled on partnerships with platforms (Nieman Journalism Lab)

Nieman Journalism Lab: “We’re wounded animals and wondering if they’re going to shoot us”: Publishers have, um, cooled on partnerships with platforms. “The era when publishers could be just mildly skeptical of platforms while continuing to work with them enthusiastically appears to be over. Bring on the ‘just kill me now’ analogies — and a shift to, um, unenthusiastic partnerships.”