Mashable: Facebook compares itself to a free newspaper in a new statement about data privacy

Mashable: Facebook compares itself to a free newspaper in a new statement about data privacy. Yeah, no. “There’s a saying that predates the internet, but is often used to describe the omnipresent and free internet services like Facebook we use on a daily basis: ‘If you are not paying for it, you’re not the customer, you’re the product.’ This criticism has been frequently marched out in the fallout of Facebook’s recent Cambridge Analyticia scandal, during which it was revealed that more than 87 million user profiles were improperly shared by academic Aleksandr Kogan to a political consulting firm that helped Donald Trump.”

Knight Center: Nicaraguan journalist killed during Facebook Live broadcast of protests against pension reforms

Knight Center: Nicaraguan journalist killed during Facebook Live broadcast of protests against pension reforms. “A journalist was killed on the night of April 21 in Bluefields in eastern Nicaragua during a Facebook Live broadcast of the fourth day of protests against pension reforms Ángel Gahona, director of El Meridiano, was fatally shot in front of a judicial complex, according to newspaper La Prensa. At the time, he was broadcasting on Facebook Live a confrontation between riot police and demonstrators, according to Confidencial.”

Poynter: 16 ways to debunk hoaxes on WhatsApp

Poynter: 16 ways to debunk hoaxes on WhatsApp. “Facebook gets a lot of attention for its fake news problem, but WhatsApp is no stranger to far-reaching viral hoaxes. The private messaging platform, which hit 1 billion daily users last summer, has become a source of misinformation about everything from unions to storms. Since the platform is encrypted and groups are limited to 256 people, no one really knows when or where content goes viral — not even WhatsApp itself. That has made it exceedingly difficult for fact-checkers to uncover and debunk WhatsApp hoaxes, developing innovative workarounds in order to at least partially address fakery on the platform.”

Nieman Lab: Facebook’s News Feed changes appear to be hurting — not helping — local news

Nieman Lab: Facebook’s News Feed changes appear to be hurting — not helping — local news. “More meaningful interactions! More love for local news! These were supposed to be some of the positive changes associated with the algorithm change Facebook announced early this year. But so far the local news love is lacking: Pete Brown, senior research fellow at the Tow Center for Digital Journalism, crunched the numbers and found that ’11 out of 13 regional metros averaged fewer interactions per post in the nine weeks following the pro-local algorithm change than in the two years before.’ And the 13 regional metros that Brown looked at? They’re the papers that are participating in Facebook’s Local News Subscription Accelerator.”

Poynter: Who reads fact-checking and why? Here’s what one outlet found out

Poynter: Who reads fact-checking and why? Here’s what one outlet found out. “A British fact-checking organization recently heard from more than 2,000 people about how and why they read fact checks. On Tuesday, Full Fact published its first large-scale audience research survey, based on a fall 2017 survey of self-selected participants that contained 24 questions, supplemented with data from Google Analytics and polls. While not representative, the findings are part of a larger trend among fact-checkers to conduct in-house audience analyses.”

Source: Introducing the Field Guide to Security Training in the Newsroom

Source: Introducing the Field Guide to Security Training in the Newsroom. “Most people don’t think much about privacy or security until they find themselves in a situation where they really need it. Often, by then it is too late. Wrapping your head around how the internet works while you’re in the middle of a high-stakes investigation is a distraction you can head off by taking privacy seriously before you encounter a crisis. The 2016 Presidential election got a lot of folks, in and out of newsrooms, thinking about their digital privacy. And it reinforced something we’ve known for a while: there are not enough trainers to go around. There are fantastic people at great organizations that do lead trainings. There are also a lot of reporters who happen to have higher security standards than their colleagues, and they get called on to lead these trainings. But it is clear that there’s room for far more.”

BuzzFeed: How To Spot A Deepfake Like The Barack Obama–Jordan Peele Video

BuzzFeed: How To Spot A Deepfake Like The Barack Obama–Jordan Peele Video. “Don’t be embarrassed if you were fooled, even if only briefly. Technology to trick our eyes and ears is advancing rapidly. Teams in Germany are working on Face2Face, the type of face- and voice-swapping technology used to create the video above. Software giant Adobe is creating a “Photoshop for audio” that makes it easy to edit and manipulate what someone has said, as is a Montreal startup called Lyrebird. After you’ve selectively edited someone’s words, you could take that audio and use tech developed at the University of Washington to generate a video of the very same person speaking those words, just to make it fully convincing.”