MakeUseOf: Are You Wrong? 5 Sites to Find Out

MakeUseOf: Are You Wrong? 5 Sites to Find Out. “The human mind is a complex beast. It draws information from various sources. Sometimes, odd things stick with us, and over time, our mind treats them as ‘facts’. Only one day, we find that it isn’t a fact at all. You’ll be surprised how often you are wrong. It’s not stupidity, gullibility, or any defect in you. Misconceptions happen, it’s a part of being human. Whether it’s the news you read, the “facts” you heard, or the things you believed in. As you grow up, you should want to challenge yourself, and figure out what you are wrong about and what you are right about. Here are a few sites to help.”

Latin American Herald Tribune: Epa Launches New Multimedia News Service for Europe’s Citizens and Media

Latin American Herald Tribune: Epa Launches New Multimedia News Service for Europe’s Citizens and Media. “The European Pressphoto Agency (epa) launched on Saturday a new information tool targeted at European citizens and media, focusing on world news with an emphasis on events happening in Europe. Epa, which brings together nine news agencies from across Europe including Spain’s EFE, said in a statement that its new portal aimed to offer members of the public direct access to current events through the media.”

Poynter: I studied how journalists used Twitter for two years. Here’s what I learned

Poynter: I studied how journalists used Twitter for two years. Here’s what I learned. “Twitter reflects the good, the bad and just plain ugly reality of social media these days. Consumers are constantly migrating to new platforms for news. It’s a great challenge for legacy media companies. And for academics, journalists and voters, there’s never been a more crucial time to talk about the impact that Twitter and other platforms have on factual journalism that holds the powerful accountable to the citizens.”

NewCo: C’mon Facebook. It’s Time For Your Toddler Twin Media Party.

NewCo: C’mon Facebook. It’s Time For Your Toddler Twin Media Party.. “Truth is, with all these platform players, media is not only a crucial product, it’s the primary product. I’m not going to get into why in this post (I will next time, promise.) Instead I’ll predict that quite soon, platforms, including Facebook, will lose their equivocation and embrace content creation.”

Google: More news in Google News & Weather

From Google: More news in Google News & Weather. “The world of news is broad, deep and ever-changing. The News & Weather app shows the top three stories from various sections on its Home page, but beneath this surface lie many more informative and engaging stories. In fact, we find that many people regularly hit the bottom of our Home page looking for more to read. To offer you further opportunities to discover great content, we’ve added over 200 news stories to the Home screen in a browsable stream called More Headlines.”

Introducing Trending Storylines: Discover trending news and views on LinkedIn (LinkedIn)

LinkedIn: Introducing Trending Storylines: Discover trending news and views on LinkedIn. “Today we’re excited to announce the launch of Trending Storylines. Storylines are daily curated interest-based feeds about the most important developing stories in your industry. They help you discover and discuss news, ideas and diverse perspectives from the largest group of professionals, publishers and editorial voices ever assembled.” “Except Quora,” LinkedIn did not add. I’m not sure that’s correct, but this announcement made me think of Quora straight off – and that nothing in the announcement would move me away from Quora.

US News & World Report: Sharers Rather Than Authors More Important on Social Media

US News & World Report: Sharers Rather Than Authors More Important on Social Media. “The person who shares a news story on social media is more important than the story’s actual source in determining whether readers believe it, a study by the Media Insight Project has found. In a previous study, consumers said they paid greater heed to where the story originated. But the Media Insight Project, a collaboration between The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research and the American Press Institute, set up an experiment that found something different.”