Internet Archive: TV news chyron data provide ways to explore breaking news reports & bias

Internet Archive: TV news chyron data provide ways to explore breaking news reports & bias . “Today the Internet Archive’s TV News Archive announces a new way to plumb our TV news collections to see how news stories are reported: data feeds for the news that appears as chyrons on the lower thirds of TV screens. Our Third Eye project scans the lower thirds of TV screens, using OCR, or optical character recognition, to turn these fleeting missives into downloadable data ripe for analysis. At launch, Third Eye tracks BBC News, CNN, Fox News, and MSNBC, and contains more than four million chyrons captured in just over two weeks.”

Columbia Journalism Review: Dating app Tinder can be a tool for journalists

Columbia Journalism Review: Dating app Tinder can be a tool for journalists. “My Tinder profile included a professional photo and read: ‘I am a journalist, can I ask you a few questions?’ I swiped right on several profiles, matched with a few, and simply started talking. Granted, some folks I chatted with later admitted they thought the ‘journalist’ thing was a pickup line. But I started each conversation explaining my intentions and confirming that they were comfortable going on record. In an hour, I had a few new friends and a general idea about the island’s concerns.”

Online Journalism Blog: 10 principles for data journalism in its second decade

Online Journalism Blog: 10 principles for data journalism in its second decade. “In 2007 Bill Kovach and Tom Rosenstiel published The Elements of Journalism. With the concept of ‘journalism’ increasingly challenged by the fact that anyone could now publish to mass audiences, their principles represented a welcome platform-neutral attempt to articulate exactly how journalism could be untangled from the vehicles that carried it and the audiences it commanded. In this extract from a forthcoming book chapter* I attempt to use Kovach and Rosenstiel’s principles (outlined in part 1 here) as the basis for a set that might form a basis for (modern) data journalism as it enters its second and third decades.”

Ubergizmo: Bing Fact Check Labels Now Visible In Search Results

Ubergizmo: Bing Fact Check Labels Now Visible In Search Results. “To combat the surge in fake news, Google started adding fact check findings to search and news results earlier this year. It started working with fact checking organizations like PolitiFact and Snopes for this purpose. Bing is now doing something similar. Microsoft’s search engine will now display a fact check label in search results to help users find fact checking information on news and webpages within search results.”

BuzzFeed: Here’s Why It Doesn’t Matter If People Trust Facebook’s Fake News Label In The News Feed

BuzzFeed: Here’s Why It Doesn’t Matter If People Trust Facebook’s Fake News Label In The News Feed. “Almost exactly nine months ago, the company announced it would add a ‘disputed by third party fact-checkers’ label to links in the News Feed that external fact checkers deemed completely false. Since then, the label has been a major focus of reporting and research. ‘Tagging fake news on Facebook doesn’t work, study says,’ read the headline on a Politico story about a draft research paper. (Facebook questioned the study’s methodology and the validity of its findings.) But here’s the hidden truth people keep missing: the public’s reaction to the disputed label is largely irrelevant to stopping the spread of misinformation.”

Newsvine Is Shutting Down October 1

Newsvine is shutting down October 1. “We have added some buttons on the “Edit Content” page where you can download all of your content (articles and seeds) as rss (for easy ingest into another blog platform) or csv. We realize that this amounts to over a decade of work for some, so we hope you take it with you!” I have had Newsvine in my RSS feed reader for ages but it’s gotten increasingly spammier. Sad but not surprised to see it go.

The Verge: Google News now displays localized community updates from bloggers

The Verge: Google News now displays localized community updates from bloggers. “Google announced today that it’s going to start including hyperlocal events in Google News. Pulling from sources like bloggers and high school newspapers, the new feature, called Community Updates, will keep you in the loop on ‘news and events happening right in your own backyard,’ according to Google.”