Nieman Lab: Does your Google News change based on whether you’re conservative or liberal?

Nieman Lab: Does your Google News change based on whether you’re conservative or liberal?. “How much do algorithms encourage echo chambers? We know that the information people receive can be very different depending on the terms they Google — and that can lead to fears about people with different political leanings receiving very different news. A small study that will be published in Computers in Human Behavior, however, provides some reassuring news.”

Twitter Blog: Finding the news in the noise

Twitter Blog: Finding the news in the noise. “As Bloomberg recently announced, we are expanding our partnership so that Bloomberg can now provide a new, real-time feed of curated Twitter data to its enterprise customers. Algorithmic traders using Bloomberg’s Event Driven Feeds product can now access potentially market-moving Tweets curated by Bloomberg technologies and expertise and enriched with Bloomberg insights and metadata.”

Nieman Lab: An analysis of 16,000 stories, across 100 U.S. communities, finds very little actual local news

Nieman Lab: An analysis of 16,000 stories, across 100 U.S. communities, finds very little actual local news. “We know that local journalism is suffering. We talk about news deserts and shuttering newspapers. Research has tended to focus on individual communities, or more broadly on certain types of journalism outlets and the coverage of certain types of topics. But what do the problems for local news look like on a broader level? Researchers from the News Measures Research Project at Duke analyzed more than 16,000 news stories across 100 U.S. communities with populations ranging from 20,000 to 300,000 people. (U.S. Census data identifies 493 such communities; the researchers chose a random sample of 100.) What they found isn’t promising.”

Nieman Lab: With “Your Feed,” The New York Times lets iOS users follow topics and journalists (in a non-overwhelming way)

Nieman Lab: With “Your Feed,” The New York Times lets iOS users follow topics and journalists (in a non-overwhelming way). “The Times publishes around 160 articles a day, and most of those will never be on the homepage of the app or in the section fronts. ‘Your Feed’ is designed to help readers follow content they might miss otherwise. They can select from 24 channels to follow — some organized around section or topic (‘From the Magazine,’ ‘Gender & Society,’ ‘The Mueller Investigation,’ ‘Books of the Week’), others based on specific columnists (Nicholas Kristoff, Farhad Manjoo’s State of the Art column).”

Poynter: Snopes is feuding with one of the internet’s most notorious hoaxers

Poynter: Snopes is feuding with one of the internet’s most notorious hoaxers. “t looks like a Snopes fact check. It reads like a Snopes fact check. And on first glance, it looks like one of the outlandish fake news stories that ends up getting debunked. But the article — titled ‘FACT-CHECK: Did Kim Jong Un Really Invite Donald Trump To His Birthday party?’ — isn’t from Snopes at all. It’s satire. And it’s just one example of the ongoing feud between the fact-checking project and one of the internet’s most notorious hoaxers.”

BetaNews: The future role of AI in fact checking

BetaNews: The future role of AI in fact checking. “As an analyst, I’d like to have a universal fact checker. Something like the carbon monoxide detectors on each level of my home. Something that would sound an alarm when there’s danger of intellectual asphyxiation from choking on the baloney put forward by certain sales people, news organizations, governments, and educators, for example.”