Lifehacker Australia: How to Get the Most Out of Apple News Now That Facebook Is a No-Go

Lifehacker Australia: How to Get the Most Out of Apple News Now That Facebook Is a No-Go. “If you’re familiar with the service – awesome. If you’re new to it however and would like some insight into how best to use it, we’re here to help. Here are some tips on how to make sure you’re curating your news experience to suit your needs and preferences i.e. all Lifehacker, all the time (I’m joking).”

Fast Company: Facebook has banned Australian news, but there’s a workaround

Fast Company: Facebook has banned Australian news, but there’s a workaround. “It’s unlikely that the news ban will last forever, at least in its current form….But in the meantime, Facebook users are stuck without a way to share reliable information on the world’s largest social media platform. That’s not ideal, given how easily misinformation can flourish on Facebook instead. Fortunately, there is a workaround.”

CNET: Facebook pulled news in Australia. Here’s why that matters everywhere

CNET: Facebook pulled news in Australia. Here’s why that matters everywhere. “Thanks to Facebook’s decision, people and publications in Australia can no longer post news stories. In fact, users can’t even see news stories. Posts from international publishers like the New York Times don’t appear in Australian feeds at all. The implementation has been chaotic. Facebook has accidentally blocked various government pages, including two official health agencies amid a pandemic. Some publications are blank not just in Australia, but around the world. Many of my US colleagues can’t see the posts on CNET’s Facebook page.”

NiemanLab: Daily Nation, the largest newspaper in Kenya, adopts a paywall — and predicts more African-owned publications will, too

NiemanLab: Daily Nation, the largest newspaper in Kenya, adopts a paywall — and predicts more African-owned publications will, too. “To read Nation articles more than seven days old — like this report that thousands of students have failed to turn up at schools after their nine-month closure due to Covid-19 or a viral column asking ‘Who is the banana republic now?’ following the U.S. Capitol riot — users will have to pay up. Subscriptions start at 50Ksh for one week, 150Ksh for one month, or 750Ksh for one year. (50Ksh is about 45 cents USD.)”

New York Times: Russian Campaign Promotes Homegrown Vaccine and Undercuts Rivals

New York Times: Russian Campaign Promotes Homegrown Vaccine and Undercuts Rivals. “Russian news outlets connected to election disinformation campaigns in the United States have set their sights on a new target: convincing Spanish-speaking countries that the Russian coronavirus vaccine works better than its American competitors, according to researchers and State Department officials.”

Reuters: Google opens paid-for Australia news platform in drive to undercut Canberra’s content payment law

Reuters: Google opens paid-for Australia news platform in drive to undercut Canberra’s content payment law. “Tech giant Google on Friday launched a platform in Australia offering news it has paid for, striking its own content deals with publishers in a drive to show legislation proposed by Canberra to enforce payments, a world first, is unnecessary.”

TechCrunch: Facebook News launches in the UK, the first international market for its curated news portal

TechCrunch: Facebook News launches in the UK, the first international market for its curated news portal. “As the United Kingdom prepares to sharpen its focus on how it regulates big tech companies, Facebook is taking a big step up in the role it plays in presenting media to the U.K. public, and into how it works with the country’s media industry. Today it is launching Facebook News in the U.K., Facebook’s first market outside of the U.S. for its dedicated, curated news portal — accessed, like the U.S. version, through a tab in the Android or iOS app menu.”

Poynter: Our new Professor’s Press Pass delivers timely classroom lessons for journalism educators

Poynter: Our new Professor’s Press Pass delivers timely classroom lessons for journalism educators. “I remember wishing there was a wire service or app for teachers that would pick out the juiciest trends in journalism and deliver them on a silver platter to beleaguered professors. The Professor’s Press Pass is that tool. The service costs $12 a month or $100 a year, and your subscription goes directly back to creating more content for classrooms. A new classroom discussion topic is added each Friday, and I’ll give you a sneak peek in Alma Matters every issue.” Three samples are freely available online.

NiemanLab: Tiny News Collective aims to launch 500 new local news organizations in three years

NiemanLab: Tiny News Collective aims to launch 500 new local news organizations in three years. “Starting a local news organization from scratch is difficult, confusing, and expensive. Reaching sustainability? Even harder. Enter The Tiny News Collective, a new venture from News Catalyst and LION [Local Independent Online News] Publishers. The project will offer entrepreneurial journalists a tech stack, business training, legal assistance, and back-office services like payroll for around $100 a month.”

NiemanLab: A lot of Americans get news from social media, but they don’t expect it to be true

NiemanLab: A lot of Americans get news from social media, but they don’t expect it to be true. “During a year full of misinformation, from vaccines to voter fraud, Pew surveyed 9,220 U.S. adults between August 31 and September 7 about 11 different social media platforms. Of those who get news on social media at least ‘sometimes,’ 59 percent said they expect the information they find there to be inaccurate, a sentiment that remains unchanged from 2019.”

Poynter: What to expect from fact-checking in 2021

Poynter: What to expect from fact-checking in 2021. “2020 has likely been the most chaotic year in the 21st century and certainly an overwhelming one for fact-checkers. The coronavirus pandemic not only shook the world in an unprecedented way, but it also redesigned how fact-checkers work, how we learn from one another and, most importantly, how we collaborate not only locally but globally.”