Feminist New Orleans Paper DISTAFF Digitized and Put Online

A 1970s feminist newspaper from New Orleans has been digitized and put online. From the collection’s home page: “Distaff was the first and only feminist newspaper published in New Orleans. Founded in 1972 by Mary Gehman and Donna Swanson, Distaff served as a forum for women’s voices in politics, activism, and the arts. One of the few newspapers published by and for women in the Gulf South, Distaff covered a wide range of topics and issues, including reproductive rights, pay equity and women’s rights in the workplace, lesbian activism, the Equal Rights Amendment, literature and the arts, and women in politics. Issues were edited and produced by a coalition of New Orleans women known for their activism in political spheres. A preview issue was published in 1973 and the newspaper continued to be published until 1982. There was a hiatus in publication from 1976-1978.”

Arkansas State Archives: Arkansas State Archives participates in newspaper digitization project

Arkansas State Archives: Arkansas State Archives participates in newspaper digitization project. “The Arkansas State Archives, in partnership with the Central Arkansas Library System (CALS), has digitized 24 Arkansas newspapers through a joint newspaper digitization project with Newspapers.com in order to provide more access to these resources, Department of Arkansas Heritage Director Stacy Hurst announced today. The State Archives contributed 208 rolls from 17 different Arkansas newspapers, with a total of 209,000 pages scanned, digitized, and indexed by Newspapers.com. In addition, the digitized newspapers will be made available online for free to patrons in the State Archives research room and at the Central Arkansas Library System.”

Columbia Journalism Review: The Facebook rescue that wasn’t

Columbia Journalism Review: The Facebook rescue that wasn’t. “IF YOU GO TO THE HOMEPAGE of the Watershed Post, the online news source for the Catskill region of upstate New York, there are plenty of stories about rural regeneration: agritourism and a new creamery, the ongoing political wrangling over the development of the Belleayre ski resort, property ads where prices are significantly up from a few years ago. But one part of the region’s fortunes is not reviving: the Watershed Post itself.”

New From Library of Congress: Japanese-American Internment Camp Newspapers, 1942 to 1946

Now available from the Library of Congress: Japanese-American Internment Camp Newspapers, 1942 to 1946. From the About page: “Produced by the Japanese-Americans interned at assembly centers and relocation centers around the country during World War II, these newspapers provide a unique look into the daily lives of the people who were held in these camps. They include articles written in English and Japanese, typed, handwritten and drawn. They advertise community events, provide logistical information about the camps and relocation, report on news from the community, and include editorials.”

From pulp to pixel: The Minneapolis Star Tribune has digitized every article since 1867 (Poynter)

Poynter: From pulp to pixel: The Minneapolis Star Tribune has digitized every article since 1867. “Until now, archives from The Minneapolis Tribune and The Minneapolis Star, which merged in 1982, weren’t all available in one place. Now, the Star Tribune has digitized more than 54,000 issues from the past 150 years.”

South Dakota: Newspaper digitization advisory board selects newspapers to digitize for federal grant

South Dakota: Newspaper digitization advisory board selects newspapers to digitize for federal grant. “The South Dakota State Historical Society has announced that more historical newspapers will be digitized as part of a federal grant…. An advisory board made up of individuals from history and newspaper backgrounds met in November and March to select which titles would be digitized with this second round of federal funding. Among those selected and approved by the Library of Congress were the Deutscher Herold of Sioux Falls, the Lemmon Herald, the German and English editions of the Eureka Post, the De Smet Leader, the Madison Daily Leader and the Oglala Light of Pine Ridge. In total, 17 more South Dakota towns will be represented in the collection by the end of the project.”