News and Tribune: Decades of student publications digitized at IU Southeast

News and Tribune: Decades of student publications digitized at IU Southeast. “On April 1, 1947, the second edition of The Southeastern Student was released to students and staff at Indiana University Southeast. The edition, an early ancestor of today’s student newspaper, The Horizon, consisted of school reminders, updates on the employment of alumni and statistics on a recent basketball tournament in Bloomington. That student publication, just two pages long and without photographs or design elements, paved the way for more than seven decades of student work. The bulk of those publications (1947-2007) have been digitized and are available online thanks to grants from the Horseshoe Foundation of Floyd County and Indiana University Bicentennial.”

The Catholic Telegraph: All Issues Of The Catholic Telegraph From 1831 – 1885 Now Online

The Catholic Telegraph: All Issues Of The Catholic Telegraph From 1831 – 1885 Now Online. “All issues of The Catholic Telegraph from 1831-1885 can now be read online. Funded by grants from the State Library of Ohio and the Hamilton County Genealogical Society, the Catholic Research Resources Alliance has been working with the archdiocese’s archives to digitize, index, and post the issues. “

PR Newswire: Gale Introduces New Digital Archive on Amateur Newspapers From the 19th Century (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: Gale Introduces New Digital Archive on Amateur Newspapers From the 19th Century (PRESS RELEASE.) “Gale, a Cengage company, is introducing a new digital archive that’s considered the social media of the 19th century and gives students and researchers a unique inside look at how teens and young adults of the period expressed themselves and their opinions to the world. Amateur Newspapers from the American Antiquarian Society is the largest and most extensive digital archive in the U.S., providing authentic newspaper writings published by the younger generation of the 19th century. The archive gives an unprecedented look at how youth viewed themselves, their hometowns, the country and the world around them during the era, drawing researchers into the world of America’s first youth subcultures.”

EIN Presswire: Over 100 Years of Japanese-American History (PRESS RELEASE)

EIN Presswire: Over 100 Years of Japanese-American History (PRESS RELEASE). “Over 100 years of Japanese-American history is now available online through Rafu Shimpo (羅府新報, the L.A. Japanese Daily News) Digital Archive, a new collection on East View’s Global Press Archive platform. Founded in 1903 to support the small but growing Japanese community in the Little Tokyo area of Los Angeles, California, Rafu Shimpo was published daily, with an English-language section added to the Sunday edition in 1926. By the 1940s the newspaper had grown to be the largest-circulation newspaper published in Japanese in the United States.”

Nieman Lab: La Pulla’s wildly popular YouTube videos (born at a 130-year-old newspaper) are bringing hard news to young Colombians

Nieman Lab: La Pulla’s wildly popular YouTube videos (born at a 130-year-old newspaper) are bringing hard news to young Colombians. “María Paulina Baena gets stopped on the streets of Bogota, Colombia. Young people ask to take selfies with her and tell her how much they love La Pulla. The 27-year-old is the public face of the satirical video column that has shaken up the way young people consume news in Colombia. Created two years ago by five young journalists from the country’s oldest newspaper, the 130-year-old El Espectador, La Pulla has succeeded at what publishers worldwide long to do — connect with millennial audiences.”

Chicago Magazine: How the Obsidian Collection Is Bringing Black Newspapers to Google

Chicago Magazine: How the Obsidian Collection Is Bringing Black Newspapers to Google. “Digitizing legacy. That’s the job of the curators behind The Obsidian Collection – archivists for The Chicago Defender, Baltimore Afro American and other historically black newspapers in the United States. Their task is massive: digitize every image and article from newspapers that played a central role in the Great Migration, Civil Rights and Jim Crow eras. But they won’t have to do it all alone. Google Arts & Culture is working with the Obsidian group on creating digital exhibits that can be free and searchable by anyone around the world.”

Glasgow Live: Adverts for runaway slaves in 18th century shared in Glasgow University database

Glasgow Live: Adverts for runaway slaves in 18th century shared in Glasgow University database. “Fugitive slave adverts from 18th century UK newspapers have been published in a new database from Glasgow University. The harrowing tales of hundreds of enslaved and bound people escaping their captivity have been unveiled in the Runaway Slaves in Britain project.”