Digital NC: Franklin Times now covering 1909-1944 and 1963-1972 online

Digital NC: Franklin Times now covering 1909-1944 and 1963-1972 online. “More issues of The Franklin Times, provided by our partner, Louisburg College, are now available online. The issues are from the years 1912-1944 and 1963-1972, and join previously digitized issues from 1909-1911. Established in 1870, The Franklin Times covers news in Louisburg, North Carolina, as well as statewide and national news of note.”

Abundant Genealogy: Newspaper Clippings – Using Reverse Search to Cite Sources and Save Your Sanity

Abundant Genealogy: Newspaper Clippings – Using Reverse Search to Cite Sources and Save Your Sanity. “A well-meaning relative sends you a packet of newspaper clippings about your ancestors. Or you receive several obituaries pasted to 3×5 inch index cards. Or you are given a scrapbook created in the 1920s or 1930s with a variety of news articles clipped from newspapers and magazines. Of course, when clipped there is no date, no newspaper masthead or header with the name, volume number, page number etc. Your relative (or someone) may have handwritten the date or other information along the margins, but rarely do they include everything you need as a researcher. So how do you track down the original source and cite it properly?” nicely done!

Digital NC: Smithfield Herald Now Digitized Online

Digital NC: Smithfield Herald Now Digitized Online. “138 issues of the Smithfield Herald have been newly added to DigitalNC, courtesy of our partner, the Johnston County Heritage Center. These are the first issues of the Smithfield Herald digitized on DigitalNC, covering January 1917 to April 1918. Established in 1882, the Herald was at one point the oldest operating newspaper in Johnston County. “

The Guardian: Brazil’s biggest newspaper pulls content from Facebook after algorithm change

The Guardian: Brazil’s biggest newspaper pulls content from Facebook after algorithm change. “Brazil’s biggest newspaper, the Folha de S Paulo, has announced that it will no longer publish content on its Facebook page, accusing the social media giant of encouraging fake news with an overhaul of its news feed algorithm.”

Columbia Journalism Review: How Tom Tryniski digitized nearly 50 million pages of newspapers in his living room

Columbia Journalism Review: How Tom Tryniski digitized nearly 50 million pages of newspapers in his living room. “TOM TRYNISKI DOES NOT LOCK HIS DOORS. He spends most days sitting in his living room in Fulton, New York, 30 miles northwest of Syracuse, in front of two jumbo computer monitors, looking something like a security guard, but friendlier. He appears young for 68—skinny, with a head of white hair and an energetic demeanor. He wears a uniform of jeans and a slim-fitting T-shirt, but no coat in the chilly fall air. When we talk, he is almost always smirking.”

Colorado Virtual Library: Help is Here for Newspaper Digitization!

Colorado Virtual Library: Help is Here for Newspaper Digitization!. “The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection (CHNC) is excited to announce a new program to support the addition of new historic news in the CHNC. The Colorado Historic Newspapers Collection New Content Support Program for newspaper digitization is designed to help cultural heritage organizations increase online access to historic community news through the CHNC. We want to help local communities add their historic stories to the larger Colorado footprint.”

Digital NC: 70 years of Mars Hill University student newspaper now online

Digital NC: 70 years of Mars Hill University student newspaper now online. “Seventy years of The Hilltop, Mars Hill University’s student newspaper, have been added to DigitalNC. The 924 issues were provided by our partner, Mars Hill University, and cover academic years from 1926-1995. Mars Hill University is located in Mars Hill, a town in Madison County approximately 20 minutes north of Asheville in the mountains of western North Carolina. According to the university’s website, it is ‘the oldest institution of higher learning in western North Carolina on its original site.'”