East View Makes Japan Times Digital Archive Available (Subscription)

East View has launched a complete archive of The Japan Times. This is a subscription service. ‘The Japan Times publication was founded in 1897, with the intention to “give Japanese the opportunity to read news and current events in English and to help Japan to participate more fully in the international community.’ This new digital archive includes every newspaper published between 1897 and 2014 (nearly 500,000 pages), with annual updates.”

Cornell University Digitizing Four Collections

Cornell University is digitizing four of its collections, including a collection containing Palmyra pictures taken in 1885. The collections are “…the Cornell Costume and Textile Collection, which includes more than 10,000 items of apparel, flat textiles and accessories dating from the late 18th century,” the aforementioned Palmyra pictures – “…the Sterrett Photographs collection, which documents major archaeological monuments in present-day Greece, Turkey, Cyprus, Syria and Iraq…”, music: “Benjamin Piekut, associate professor of music, will lead a project to digitize the Lindsay Cooper Archive, currently housed in a London storage locker and inaccessible to researchers. The project is a partnership between Cornell and the University of the Arts London to make Cooper’s scores and archival recordings available….” and feminist publications: “The fourth project will digitize the full content of ‘On Our Backs,’ a historically important publication used by students and researchers in the visual, political, historical, and gender and sexuality fields…”

Two 20th-Century Irish Newspapers Have Been Digitized and Put Online

Two twentieth-century Irish newspapers have been digitized and put online. “For historians of the British and Irish communist movements, Irish republicanism, the Northern Ireland conflict, and those examining the Irish community in Britain generally, the digitisation and uploading online of the newspapers of the Connolly Association, Irish Freedom (1939-1944) and the Irish Democrat (1945-2000), by the group are an important development that will make research much easier. Wedding traditional Irish republicanism with socialism, the Connolly Association played a highly visible role in the Irish community in Britain after its establishment in 1938, having branches in most of the main cities to which Irish immigrants were attracted in the large-scale post-war migration across the Irish Sea.” The issues are both viewable online and downloadable as PDFs. Navigation is a little awkward, but load time is quick and the issues I looked at from 1951 were very readable.

Ancestry and Gannett Teaming Up For Newspaper Digitizing Project

Ancestry is teaming up with Gannett for a huge newspaper digitization project (PRESS RELEASE). “Ancestry, the leader in family history and consumer genetics, today announced its collaboration with Gannett Co., Inc., the largest local-to-national media company, to digitize more than 80 daily newspapers across the nation. Newspapers.com, an Ancestry business unit, and Gannett will provide a historical newspaper viewing experience complete with full text search, clipping and sharing features. Together, they expect to deliver more than 100 million full-page images of historical newspapers in a simple, easy-to-use online archive.”

State of Indiana Getting More Digitized Newspapers

The state of Indiana is getting more digitized newspapers. “29 reels of county newspapers dating from the 1850s to the 1930s will be digitized and available on the state’s online archive of historic newspapers, The Hoosier State Chronicles. Some of the papers include the Crawfordsville Journal, the Waynetown Banner, the Montgomery Journal and nine more titles. Though unrelated to this project, there are already 194 issues of the Crawfordsville Record available at the website, newspapers.library.in.gov.”

NYT Builds a Robot for Article Tagging

Fascinating stuff: the New York Times built a robot for article tagging. “The key feature of the automatic tagging system relies on bringing machines into the mix, an idea that inspires conflicting ideas of progress and dread in some journalists. For Editor to work, the lab needed to build a way for machines and humans to supplement each other’s strengths. Humans are great at seeing context and connections and understanding language, while machines can do computations at enormous scale and have perfect memory. Mike Dewar, a data scientist at the Times R&D lab, said the artificial neural network makes connections between the text and an index of terms pulled from every article in the Times archive.”

Detroit Jewish Chronicle is Getting Digitized

The Detroit Jewish Chronicle is getting digitized. “The Detroit Jewish News Foundation is currently digitizing every issue of the Detroit Jewish Chronicle, which was published from March 1916 until July 1951. Come this fall, those pages will be added to the more than 270,000 pages of Detroit Jewish history from the Detroit Jewish News already contained in the William Davidson Digital Archive of Jewish Detroit History…”

Southern Voice Newspaper Collection Now Available at DLG

The Southern Voice Newspaper collection is now available in the Digital Library of Georgia. “We are excited to announce the availability the Southern Voice newspaper collection, 1988-1995 thanks to our partners at Kennesaw State University (KSU) Archives. The Southern Voice newspaper, also known as SOVO, was an alternative news source for lesbians and gay men in the greater Atlanta area and Southeast for over 20 years.”

McGill University Uploading Student Publications to Internet Archives

McGill University has a bunch of student publications up at the Internet Archive. “Last winter we were able to digitize over 50 rolls of microfilm containing over 9,000 issues of the McGill Daily. Starting with their very first issue from October 2nd, 1911 we are going to be spending the summer uploading just over 9,000 issues dating to 2001 to our new Internet Archive collection of McGill Student Publications. Check back often during the summer as we’ll be uploading a few hundred issues each day.”

Washington Post Starts Encrypting Part of Its Site

The Washington Post has begun encrypting part of their Web site. “The Washington Post will begin encrypting parts of its Web site Tuesday, making it more difficult for hackers, government agencies and others to track the reading habits of people who visit the site. The added security will immediately apply to The Post’s homepage as well as stories on the site’s national security page and the technology policy blog The Switch. The encryption will roll out to the rest of the site over the coming months.”

The Guardian on Preserving and Digitizing Newspapers

From The Guardian: a fascinating story technology, old newspapers, and the race for preservation.. “In the dark void of the National Newspaper Building, the robots are afoot. Towering 20 metres high and stretching far into the distance is an imposing expanse of racks, heaving with trays bearing volume upon volume of newspapers, laid flat and strapped between metal sheets. Suddenly, an enormous autonomous crane zooms forwards, stops abruptly and, with a hydraulic gasp, shoots out an arm. Lifting a large metal tray off the scaffold, it deposits it on a conveyor belt and races into the dark. One of three poised for action, it lurks in the gloom, awaiting a command – robots, after all, don’t need the lights on. The tray and its heavy load are whisked away, making a swift right angle at a turntable, and exit through an airlock. A driverless shuttle car then speeds it to […]

Cleveland Jewish News Now Available for Free

It’s not a new resource per se; the new bit is that it doesn’t cost anything. The Cleveland Jewish News digital archive is now available for free. “On July 1, the Cleveland Jewish News unlocked its Digital Archive, making every story, photograph and advertisement available at the push of a few buttons….Issues of the CJN will be made publicly available online 90 days after publication. CJN digital edition subscribers have immediate access to all content as it is published.” I had to provide my name and e-mail to access, but I didn’t have to set up an account or anything.