Washington Post: Nigeria suspends Twitter after the social media platform freezes president’s account

Washington Post: Nigeria suspends Twitter after the social media platform freezes president’s account. “Nigeria has indefinitely suspended Twitter two days after the social media giant temporarily froze the account of the nation’s president, sparking a torrent of Internet outrage in Africa’s most populous country. The minister of information and culture, Lai Mohammed, made the surprise announcement Friday in the capital Abuja, citing vague safety concerns.”

Al Jazeera: How social media regulations are silencing dissent in Africa

Al Jazeera: How social media regulations are silencing dissent in Africa. “Through social media platforms, the #EndSARS activists not only managed to call thousands of Nigerians to action and hold Nigerian authorities to account, but also garnered unprecedented international attention and support for their cause. The fact that a burgeoning human rights movement has been contemplated, created and sustained online did not go unnoticed in the overwhelmingly conservative halls of power in Nigeria. Shaken to the core by this new media phenomenon and its astounding proclivity to galvanise a traditionally silenced and disregarded youthful majority, some Nigerian state governors and public officials started to demand that social media be regulated.”

Social media could help Lagos police officers fight crime: why it’s not happening (The Conversation)

The Conversation: Social media could help Lagos police officers fight crime: why it’s not happening . “The use of social media in global crime-fighting is extensive. Common uses include the identification of criminals, evidence sources and submission of distress reports. Police departments around the world are still exploring expansive uses of social media to support crime investigation and prevention. Despite its obvious advantages, social media involvement in combating crime also poses pitfalls. Law enforcement officers might inadvertently disclose personal information, sensitive operational materials and policing tactics. Also, information released by the police through social media can be misinterpreted by the public.”

The Conversation: Nigeria needs innovation and science investment to help control COVID-19

The Conversation: Nigeria needs innovation and science investment to help control COVID-19. “To control this pandemic and prevent a future one, Nigeria needs to start investing heavily in science research. Nigeria was one of the 10 African heads of state and government that endorsed a target to allocate 1% of gross domestic product to research and development in 2002. But progress towards this target has been slow.”

Nigeria Sars protest: The misinformation circulating online (BBC)

BBC: Nigeria Sars protest: The misinformation circulating online. “Protests began earlier this month in Nigeria calling on the authorities to abolish a controversial police unit called the Special Anti-Robbery Squad (Sars). The story has started trending globally, with thousands of posts on social media, but not all of them factual. We have looked at some of the misinformation that has spread online.”

The National: New tool predicts coronavirus will displace millions of Africans

The National: New tool predicts coronavirus will displace millions of Africans. “A new tool has predicted the displacement of over a million people in the Sahel, as Covid-19 creates havoc across the brittle region. In some countries, such as Burkina Faso, Mali, Niger and Nigeria, the pandemic is expected to increase forced displacement by more than 14 percentage points. This is the equivalent of a minimum of an additional one million people being displaced across the four countries if no action is taken.”

Global Voices: Nigerians counteract COVID-19 denialism with social media campaigns

Global Voices: Nigerians counteract COVID-19 denialism with social media campaigns. “Nigerians are reducing the effect of COVID-19 denial narratives with powerful online Twitter campaigns such as #MyCOVID19NaijaStory and #COVIDStopswithMe. These counter-narratives aim to prove that the deadly coronavirus is not a hoax and more importantly, to encourage people to adopt good public health behaviours to mitigate its spread. As of July 29, Nigeria had recorded 41,804 confirmed COVID-19 cases,18,764 recoveries and 868 deaths.”

TechCabal: >COVID-19 is quietly threatening the future of Nigeria’s news media

TechCabal: COVID-19 is quietly threatening the future of Nigeria’s news media. “As print media becomes more expensive to operate, news publications are switching to the internet. Fortunately, online news consumption is high thanks to the pandemic and virus control measures. Internet service providers say data subscription has spiked as more people stay at home. By recently increasing their digital footprints, news publications are competing for an even smaller online revenue stream. Google and Facebook dominate the online advertising business. Nigerian news media, like other countries, have no leverage capable of getting these platforms to fork out a greater part of their revenue.”