Wall Street Journal: NIH Seeks One Million Volunteers for Medical Database

Wall Street Journal: NIH Seeks One Million Volunteers for Medical Database. “The National Institutes of Health has begun recruiting volunteers for a $1.46 billion medical database that will eventually comprise data on more than one million people, an effort to discern the genetic underpinnings of a range of diseases and even of healthy aging. The endeavor by the nation’s leading government medical-research entity is aimed at deciphering the workings of poorly understood maladies ranging from cancers to migraines to dementia.”

National Institutes of Health: NIH program to accelerate therapies for arthritis, lupus releases first datasets

National Institutes of Health: NIH program to accelerate therapies for arthritis, lupus releases first datasets .”Datasets characterizing individual cells in rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus disease tissue from the Accelerating Medicines Partnership for Rheumatoid Arthritis and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (AMP RA/SLE) Phase I study are now available to the research community. Scientists from across the biomedical research community can access the AMP RA/SLE datasets to explore important research questions about these autoimmune conditions.”

National Institutes of Health: NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development

National Institutes of Health: NIH releases first dataset from unprecedented study of adolescent brain development. “The National Institutes of Health Tuesday released to the scientific community an unparalleled dataset from the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. To date, more than 7,500 youth and their families have been recruited for the study, well over half the participant goal. Approximately 30 terabytes of data (about three times the size of the Library of Congress collection), obtained from the first 4,500 participants, will be available to scientists worldwide to conduct research on the many factors that influence brain, cognitive, social, and emotional development.”

NIH: NIH Clinical Center provides one of the largest publicly available chest x-ray datasets to scientific community

NIH: NIH Clinical Center provides one of the largest publicly available chest x-ray datasets to scientific community . “The NIH Clinical Center recently released over 100,000 anonymized chest x-ray images and their corresponding data to the scientific community. The release will allow researchers across the country and around the world to freely access the datasets and increase their ability to teach computers how to detect and diagnose disease. Ultimately, this artificial intelligence mechanism can lead to clinicians making better diagnostic decisions for patients.”

PubChem Blog: Publisher Springer Nature contributes millions of chemical-article links

PubChem Blog: Publisher Springer Nature contributes millions of chemical-article links. “PubChem added more than 26 million links to scientific articles, thanks to contributions from the publisher Springer Nature. Of these, 1.6 million links point to open access or free-to-read documents! Springer Nature includes the SpringerLink, SpringerOpen, and BioMed Central research platforms as well as the nature.com website. Combined, they include more than 10 million scientific documents spanning the primary literature, book chapters, and reference works. InfoChem, a subsidiary of Springer Nature, identified the chemicals mentioned in these scientific articles using a proprietary approach.”

DigitalGov: How Facebook Live Increased Reach and Engagement of Scientific Lectures at NIH

DigitalGov: How Facebook Live Increased Reach and Engagement of Scientific Lectures at NIH. “An important part of our work focuses on the U.S. military, who have both chronic pain rates and opioid use rates that are much higher than those of the general population. In fact, NCCIH is partnering on pain research initiatives with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, the Department of Defense, and several agencies at NIH. This blog post looks at how NCCIH used Facebook Live to communicate the importance of this research focus to the public, engage with concerned citizens about the future of pain management treatments, and increase the reach and visibility of this topic.”

Digitizing Material Culture: Handwritten Recipe Books, 1600-1900 (National Library of Medicine)

National Library of Medicine: Digitizing Material Culture: Handwritten Recipe Books, 1600-1900. “Cookery, alchemy, and medicine were closely intertwined in pre-modern Europe up to the 1800s. Recipes and advice for food preparation and preservation, animal husbandry, preparing useful household concoctions, and allopathic medicines and treatments for maintaining personal health were available in books via a growing publication industry and shared between friends, family, and neighbors. The head of a household would often record these in ‘receipt’ books, of which the Archives and Modern Manuscripts Collection holds a good number and has recently embarked on a project to digitize and make available in NLM Digital Collections.”