Island Free Press: Paper Nautical Charts Will Disappear as Waterway Maps Become Digitized

Island Free Press: Paper Nautical Charts Will Disappear as Waterway Maps Become Digitized. “Paper nautical charts will soon be sinking into the horizon, as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) this month announced its plan to sunset over five years the hard copy maps of the nation’s waterways. Although NOAA’s Office of Coast Survey has for years offered several digital formats for raster charts – that is, the electronic version of the paper chart – to print or download, the paper charts have also been provided by request. The electronic charts have been available since 1993.”

NOAA Tides & Currents: Prepare for coastal flooding with NOAA’s new online tool

NOAA Tides & Currents: Prepare for coastal flooding with NOAA’s new online tool. “NOAA has brought together data from its over 200 long term coastal water level stations into one web tool that can help coastal communities monitor and prepare for all types of coastal flooding. The Coastal Inundation Dashboard is a website that brings together real-time water level information, 48 hour forecasts of water levels, and historic flooding information into one powerful tool.”

Nature: Scientists despair as US government shutdown drags on

Nature: Scientists despair as US government shutdown drags on. “As the shutdown hits the two-week mark with no end in sight, its effects on science have begun to compound, leaving many government researchers weary, worried and demoralized. The National Science Foundation (NSF) has suspended reviews of grant proposals indefinitely, and is likely to delay panels scheduled to judge applications for postdoctoral fellowships in early January. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has taken widely used weather and climate databases offline. And at NASA, the shutdown threatens to disrupt preparations for upcoming spacecraft launches.”

NOAA: NOAA and partners release database for research to bridge weather to climate forecast gap

NOAA: NOAA and partners release database for research to bridge weather to climate forecast gap . “Wouldn’t it be nice to know now what the weather is going to be like for the vacation you have planned next month? Or, if you’re a farmer, whether you’re going to get enough rainfall during a crucial planting time coming up in a few weeks? Weather forecasts help us make decisions about the next few days to a week, and seasonal climate forecasts give us information on the time scale of three months to a year or more. But a significant gap in scientists’ understanding has limited the ability to forecast what will happen two weeks to two months from now, also called the subseasonal scale…. Two new datasets, funded in part by NOAA Research’s Modeling, Analysis, Predictions, and Projections (MAPP) Program, now provide easy access to 60 terabytes of climate forecasts containing predictions of rainfall, temperature, winds and other variables at the subseasonal level.”

NOAA: Historical Radar Data in Google Cloud

NOAA: Historical Radar Data in Google Cloud . “A new partnership between NCEI and Google represents another big step toward greater public access to environmental data. Our historical archive and near real-time data of Level-II Next Generation Weather Radar (NEXRAD) are now available as a public dataset on Google Cloud Storage.”

Libraries+Network: On the Preservation of and Access to NOAA’s Open Data

Libraries+Network: On the Preservation of and Access to NOAA’s Open Data. “Recent articles in the popular press and across various social media platforms have raised concerns over the continued preservation and utilization of federal data holdings, particularly NOAA’s climate-related data. These concerns have produced a number of coordinated efforts to download and store significant volumes of NOAA’s data outside of the federal data systems. While I do not share those same concerns about preservation, as NOAA’s new Chief Data Officer I recognize that the essential idea that enables these efforts — easy public access to all of NOAA’s open data — is a laudable one that NOAA’s data stewards are striving to achieve. Let’s talk about open data access first, and I’ll come back to those concerns related to preservation later.”

New Tool Can Calculate Drought in Much Smaller Areas

Researchers at Vanderbilt have developed an area-specific drought measurement tool. “[Leslie] Duncan says it uses the same calculation as the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Palmer Index, but differs by featuring an interface allowing users to input precipitation, temperature and soil data for a specific area, like an individual city or county.”