Indy Week: Volunteers Search for Racism Written into Durham Land Deeds

Indy Week: Volunteers Search for Racism Written into Durham Land Deeds. “‘[T]he lot hereby conveyed shall not be sold, transferred, conveyed, leased, or rented to persons of negro blood.’ That’s language taken from a 1932 deed for land in Duke Forest. Here’s another, from a plot off of Cole Mill Road: ‘No person of any race other than the white race shall use or occupy any building on above lot.’ These are racial covenants—racist restrictions written into legally binding land deeds.”

New Bern Sun Journal: African American voices from New Bern’s past come alive in new Oral History Library

New Bern Sun Journal: African American voices from New Bern’s past come alive in new Oral History Library. “Examples include Ben Watford, founding President of the James City Historical Society, discussing the James City Crockett-Miller Slave Quarters; a look at the history of St. Peter’s AME Zion Church; an episode about former slave George Henry White, an attorney and politician who served in the U.S. Congress from 1897 to 1901; a look at the history of New Bern’s Pleasant Hill community with Alderman Barbara Best and retired educators Mark Best and Nancy Allen; and a 2012 interview with Luke Martin, an accomplished brick mason who was the son of a former slave who served in the United States Colored Troops.”

National Association of Counties: North Carolina county library creates record of its Hmong population

New-to-me, from National Association of Counties: North Carolina county library creates record of its Hmong population. “The Catawba County Library collaborated with DigitalNC (the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center) and the Historical Association on the Hmong Heritage Project to create a digital collection of artifacts and oral histories from the county’s Hmong population… There are about 305,525 Hmong people in the United States, 14,232 of whom are in North Carolina, according to 2020 U.S. demographic data.”

UNC University Libraries: North Carolina Digital Heritage Center extends operations with $600,000 grant

UNC University Libraries: North Carolina Digital Heritage Center extends operations with $600,000 grant. “The North Carolina Digital Heritage Center (NCDHC) at the University Libraries has received a $603,154 grant to continue its operations. The Library Services and Technology Act grant comes from the State Library of North Carolina with funds from the Institute of Museum and Library Services. Established as a partnership between the University Libraries and the State Library of North Carolina, the NCDHC promotes learning by increasing open access to North Carolina’s historical and cultural heritage.”

TV News Check: WRAL Moves To Digitally Save Its Identity

TV News Check: WRAL Moves To Digitally Save Its Identity. “This Thursday, WRAL will announce a partnership with Eon Media, a Toronto-based tech company focused on artificial-intelligence video streaming solutions, that will generate boundless access to the station’s archives. The vast cache of now metadata-encoded video — amounting to half a million hours’ worth of content, according to Accarrino — will soon be made easily available to not only the WRAL newsroom, but also the general public.”

New Digital Collection: Revolutionary War Era (State Archives of North Carolina)

State Archives of North Carolina: New Digital Collection: Revolutionary War Era. “The Digital Access Branch of the State Archives of North Carolina is pleased to announce the newest collection in the North Carolina Digital Collections, the Revolutionary War Era…. The Revolutionary War Era digital collection consists primarily of court records, legal documents, correspondence, reports, and journals from selected government and private collections.”

State Archives of North Carolina: More Search Room County Record Microfilm Added to Discover Online Catalog (DOC)

State Archives of North Carolina: More Search Room County Record Microfilm Added to Discover Online Catalog (DOC). “We are excited to announce that 19 additional counties of Search Room microfilm have been added to our online searchable database, Discover Online Catalog (DOC)! The completed counties are Alexander, Alleghany, Anson, Bladen, Brunswick, Buncombe, Burke, Caldwell, Camden, Carteret, Caswell, Cleveland, Currituck, Dare, Davie, Henderson, Hertford, Hoke, and Greene.” North Carolina has 100 counties currently as well as a number of defunct entities, so this is very much a work in progress.

University of North Carolina: A monumental visual history

New-to-me, from University of North Carolina: A monumental visual history. “Commemorative Landscapes of North Carolina, or CommLand, a partnership with University Libraries, now features the stories of over 1,000 monuments across the state in all 100 counties. It is the largest and most extensive curated site devoted to a single state’s historical monuments and memorials.”

Charlotte Observer: Charlotte Symphony excavates its past, and has big plans for 90th anniversary

Charlotte Observer: Charlotte Symphony excavates its past, and has big plans for 90th anniversary. “For its 90th anniversary, the symphony is releasing four new virtual exhibitions throughout March featuring photos, artifacts, oral histories and highlights of nearly a century of music-making. The online exhibits focus on the following themes: the symphony’s founding; details on its 11 music directors; the history of its education programs and youth orchestras; and its integration in 1963.”

UNC Libraries: Grant will expand University Libraries’ use of machine learning to identify historically racist laws

UNC Libraries: Grant will expand University Libraries’ use of machine learning to identify historically racist laws. “Since 2019, experts at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s University Libraries have investigated the use of machine learning to identify racist laws from North Carolina’s past. Now a grant of $400,000 from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation will allow them to extend that work to two more states. The grant will also fund research and teaching fellowships for scholars interested in using the project’s outputs and techniques.”

WECT: Cape Fear Museum’s photo collection is now available online

WECT (North Carolina): Cape Fear Museum’s photo collection is now available online. “Cape Fear Museum of History and Science’s photographic collection is now available online to anybody for viewing. The museum worked with Rediscovery Software to create a database of the museum’s photo collection of over 15,000 images. After 20 months of work, the photos also feature tags and ways to search them via various filters.”

New Year, “New” Microfilm: An Update on County Records Added to Discover Online Catalog (DOC) (State Archives of North Carolina)

State Archives of North Carolina: New Year, “New” Microfilm: An Update on County Records Added to Discover Online Catalog (DOC). “We are excited to announce that eleven counties of Search Room microfilm have been completely added to our online searchable database, Discover Online Catalog (DOC)! The completed counties are Albemarle (defunct), Ashe, Avery, Bute (defunct), Cherokee, Chowan, Clay, Dobbs (defunct), Gates, Graham, and Tryon (defunct).”

DigitalNC: New Newspaper, The Pamlico News, Now Available

DigitalNC: New Newspaper, The Pamlico News, Now Available. “The paper was first published in the late 1960s as The Pamlico County News, but in 1977 the paper’s name was changed to The Pamlico News. The newspaper is still published under this name today. Published weekly in Bayboro, North Carolina, the paper focuses on local and broader North Carolina news including topics on community history, events and festivals, citizen accomplishments, education, and more.”

DigitalNC: The Wallace Enterprise now on DigitalNC Thanks to New Partner Thelma Dingus Bryant Library

DigitalNC: The Wallace Enterprise now on DigitalNC Thanks to New Partner Thelma Dingus Bryant Library. “Thanks to our new partner, the Thelma Dingus Bryant Library in Wallace, NC (Duplin County), twenty years of the local paper The Wallace Enterprise is now online. Over 1,000 issues covering 1931 to 1955 were digitized from microfilm. The paper covers many local topics of the day in Duplin County and wider eastern North Carolina and had the tagline ‘Devoted to the Best Interests of the People of Wallace and Duplin County.’”