The State: Archives seeks expanded access to NC court documents

The State: Archives seeks expanded access to NC court documents. “The State Archives of North Carolina is getting $140,000 toward a project designed to expand an online catalog that helps historians and other citizens know names and places within hard-to-decipher records. An improved index means they’ll know which documents they want to go read in person.”

DigitalNC: More issues of The Chatham Record are now available on DigitalNC!

DigitalNC: More issues of The Chatham Record are now available on DigitalNC!. “Over four hundred issues of The Chatham Record were recently digitized from their microfilm formats and added to DigitalNC. These new issues range from 1923 to 1929 and supplement those from 1878 to 1904 which were already available. Printed in Pittsboro, North Carolina, The Chatham Record provided weekly news to the people of Chatham County.”

DigitalNC: Over one hundred more issues of the Greensboro High School newspaper are online now

DigitalNC: Over one hundred more issues of the Greensboro High School newspaper are online now. “Thanks to our partners at the Greensboro History Museum, DigitalNC is proud to announce more digitized issues of Greensboro High School’s (now Grimsley High School) student newspaper, High Life. This addition covers 1921 to 1939, which precedes the issues that had already been available from 1940 to 1978.”

The Daily Record Project: “Remnants” of a Pivotal Paper in North Carolina’s History (DigitalNC)

DigitalNC: The Daily Record Project: “Remnants” of a Pivotal Paper in North Carolina’s History. “About two years ago, we had the honor of hosting a group of students from Wilmington who were studying one of the most politically and socially devastating moments in the state’s history–the Wilmington Coup and Race Riots of 1898. Their efforts centered around locating and studying the remaining issues of the newspaper at the center of that event, the Wilmington Daily Record. Owned and operated by African Americans, this successful paper incited racists who were already upset with the political power held by African Americans and supporters of equality. During the Coup, the Record’s offices were burned and many were killed. Thanks to these students, their mentors, and cultural heritage institutions, you can now see the seven known remaining issues of the Daily Record on DigitalNC.”

Additional Oral Histories from Hmong Keeb Kwm: Hmong Heritage Project Now Online at DigitalNC (DigitalNC)

DigitalNC: Additional Oral Histories from Hmong Keeb Kwm: Hmong Heritage Project Now Online at DigitalNC. “Nearly a dozen oral histories from Hmong Keeb Kwm: The Hmong Heritage Project are now online, courtesy of our partner, the Catawba County Library. The project, designed to preserve the local histories of the Hmong people living in North Carolina, yielded over a hundred digitized materials and oral histories, which we are privileged to host online. This batch oral histories represent the second half of the Hmong Keeb Kwm materials already hosted on DigitalNC.”

Digital Collection now Complete: The General Assembly Session Records (State Archives of North Carolina)

State Archives of North Carolina: Digital Collection now Complete: The General Assembly Session Records. “After three years, The General Assembly Session Records digital collection is now online! This digital collection covers the session records from 1709 to 1814, located in the State Archives of North Carolina.”

DigitalNC: Issues of Lincoln High School’s student newspaper, The Lincoln Echo, now online at DigitalNC!

DigitalNC: Issues of Lincoln High School’s student newspaper, The Lincoln Echo, now online at DigitalNC!. “The school served the black community in Chapel Hill prior to integration. While incomplete, the materials within provide interesting insights into the concerns of Chapel Hill high school students during this pivotal moment in North Carolina history. The issues cover news topics like sports, facility renovations, and school events, as well as creative works by students and advertisements for local businesses.”