WECT: Grave of 1898 victim discovered, funeral planned 123 years later

WECT: Grave of 1898 victim discovered, funeral planned 123 years later. “It’s been 123 years since the infamous 1898 Wilmington Massacre and the first grave of one of the Black people killed during that tragic day has been discovered. Joshua Halsey is buried in an unmarked grave in Pine Forest Cemetery off Rankin Street. Members of a non-profit research group called Third Party Project were able to locate his grave after handwritten maps in the Pine Forest registry were digitized.”

State Archives of North Carolina: Dobbs County Record Discovery!

State Archives of North Carolina: Dobbs County Record Discovery!. “Dobbs County was created in 1758 from Johnston County, named in honor of Arthur Dobbs, the Royal Governor of the colony of North Carolina. In 1791, not wanting to be reminded of the colonial past, Dobbs County was abolished and divided into Lenoir and Glasgow counties, named after current political figures. Very few series of historical documents are kept in the Archives from Dobbs since the Lenoir County courthouse burned in 1878 and 1880, destroying almost all the Dobbs County records. Land records and wills make up the bulk of our holdings for the defunct county. Now we are proud to say we also have a court docket for Dobbs County!”

DigitalNC: New Issues of High Life Now Available

DigitalNC: New Issues of High Life Now Available. “Thanks to our partner, Greensboro History Museum, new issues of Greensboro High School’s (now Grimsley High School) student newspaper High Life are now available on our website. This batch fills in previous holes from 1921 all the way to 1974. A majority of the articles in the newspaper discuss school related news such as band concerts, athletics, student council elections, fundraisers, student achievements, opinions on life at GHS, and more.”

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection

State Archives of North Carolina: Aycock Brown Photographs Digital Collection. “Charles Brantley ‘Aycock’ Brown was a journalist and photographer who moved to Ocracoke in the 1920s. He is largely credited with helping advance tourism in the Outer Banks. Aycock Brown documented the development of the Outer Banks from the 1920s into the 1960s. He would often take pictures of major events, people on the street, development projects, and anything he found interesting.”

State Archives of North Carolina: Imaging Unit Digitizes Land Grant Microfilm for NC Historical Records Online

State Archives of North Carolina: Imaging Unit Digitizes Land Grant Microfilm for NC Historical Records Online. “The Imaging Unit has been hard at work digitizing microfilm of land grant loose documents for NC Historical Records Online, a nonprofit run website that provides public access to images of original records and other relevant information for North Carolina historical and genealogical research. The site has now met the half million mark for the number of images uploaded and available.”

Elizabeth City State University: ECSU Works to Digitize and Preserve North Carolina History Thanks to State Library of North Carolina Grant

Elizabeth City State University: ECSU Works to Digitize and Preserve North Carolina History Thanks to State Library of North Carolina Grant. “Elizabeth City State University’s G.R. Little Library and its staff are working to preserve North Carolina history. Thanks to a $163,991 grant from the State Library of North Carolina (SLNC), the university’s library will be able to assist the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center (DHC) in digitizing historic documents and photographs, preserving them for future generations.”

Digital NC: Issues of The Roanoke Beacon Newspaper, from 1930-1956, Added to DigitalNC

Digital NC: Issues of The Roanoke Beacon Newspaper, from 1930-1956, Added to DigitalNC. “Additional issues of The Roanoke Beacon and Washington County News, published out of Plymouth, NC, are now online thanks to funding from the North Caroliniana Society. This newspaper was recommended for digitization by the Washington County Library which is part of Pettigrew Regional Library. With these additions, you can now search the newspaper from 1899 to 1956.”

University of North Carolina: UNC-Chapel Hill’s North Carolina Digital Heritage Center captures history from all 100 counties

University of North Carolina: UNC-Chapel Hill’s North Carolina Digital Heritage Center captures history from all 100 counties. “For more than a decade, staff members at the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center, based in the University Libraries, have been archiving historical materials across our state to paint a picture of the lives of everyday North Carolinians throughout the centuries.”

DigitalNC: Additional Materials from the Crystal Lee Sutton Collection at Alamance Community College Now Online

DigitalNC: Additional Materials from the Crystal Lee Sutton Collection at Alamance Community College Now Online . “Alamance Community College houses and cares for a wide variety of materials and artifacts documenting the career of Crystal Lee Sutton, a labor activist who came to national prominence when her story was fictionalized in the movie Norma Rae. Before her passing, Sutton donated the collection to the College and we have helped digitize another batch to share on DigitalNC.”

DigitalNC: Issues from 1951 of the Carolina Times are now on DigitalNC

DigitalNC: Issues from 1951 of the Carolina Times are now on DigitalNC. “Thanks to funding from an IDEA grant from UNC Libraries, the North Carolina Digital Heritage Center is pleased to now have the full run of 1951 issues of the Carolina Times digitized. The issues from 1951 were never microfilmed, so they were not included in previous projects to digitize the newspaper which were done from film.”

Wake County, North Carolina: Wake County Register of Deeds and Shaw University Collaborate to Complete Enslaved Persons Project

Wake County, North Carolina: Wake County Register of Deeds and Shaw University Collaborate to Complete Enslaved Persons Project. “The Wake County Register of Deeds Office and Shaw University are partnering on a project to unlock the secrets of dozens of property deeds to help better reveal the human stories of slavery in our area. The Enslaved Persons Project is a massive effort to catalog, transcribe and make public the records from more than 30 deed books containing bills of sale and property exchanges to allow hundreds of people to track the history of their families.”

Her Take: Talking With North Carolina Hip-Hop Blogger Nancia Odom (Indy Week)

Indy Week: Her Take: Talking With North Carolina Hip-Hop Blogger Nancia Odom. “It has now been a year since this hip-hop column debuted. I have enjoyed every minute of my experience documenting hip-hop in the Triangle area, but I am not the first to do so…. Highpoint native Nancia Odom, a registered nurse by trade who now leads teams in support of clinical software, launched [her blog] in 2008. The blog made her one of the first people to document hip-hop in North Carolina, and the site is still active.”

State Archives of North Carolina: Good Neighbor Council Digital Collection

State Archives of North Carolina: Good Neighbor Council Digital Collection. “On January 18, 1963, Governor Terry Sanford established the Good Neighbor Council. The council consisted of 24 citizens appointed by the governor. David S. Coltrane served as the first Chairman and Executive Director until his death in 1968. The two main missions of the council were to encourage the employment of qualified people without regard to race, and to urge youth to become better trained for employment.”