Arkivverket: Has reached 80 million personal names in the Digital Archive

Translated from the Norwegian, a little awkwardly. Arkivverket: Has reached 80 million personal names in the Digital Archive. “The reason for the gratifying increase is the National Archives’ multi-year collaboration with the international genealogy companies Ancestry, MyHeritage and FamilySearch (AMF). These have helped to make the priest’s entries in church books up to the end of the 20th century searchable. In return, companies can also publish the information on their websites. For over 20 years, many enthusiastic volunteers have written from the sources the National Archives has published in the Digital Archive. This information has then been published in the Digital Archive, so that it becomes searchable for everyone and even more easily accessible.”

UNIT: Norwegian research institutions have decided not to renew their agreement with Elsevier

Thanks to Jessamyn West for noting this on Twitter. UNIT: Norwegian research institutions have decided not to renew their agreement with Elsevier. “The offer from Elsevier is a long way from fulfilling the Norwegian requirements for open access to research articles. There is also no movement in transitioning the agreement from paying to read to paying for open publishing. The agreement with Elsevier will therefore not be renewed for 2019. The rectorates at the universities of Bergen, Oslo, Tromsø and Trondheim all support this decision.”

Norway’s petabyte plan: Store everything ever published in a 1,000-year archive (ZDNet)

ZDNet: Norway’s petabyte plan: Store everything ever published in a 1,000-year archive. “In the far north of Norway, near the Arctic Circle, experts at the National Library of Norway’s (NLN) secure storage facility are in the process of implementing an astonishing plan. They aim to digitize everything ever published in Norway: books, newspapers, manuscripts, posters, photos, movies, broadcasts, and maps, as well as all websites on the Norwegian .no domain.”

Techdirt: Norwegian Court Orders Website Of Public Domain Court Decisions Shut Down With No Due Process

Techdirt: Norwegian Court Orders Website Of Public Domain Court Decisions Shut Down With No Due Process. “Enter Hakon Wium Lie. You might know him as basically the father of Cascading Style Sheets (CSS). Or the former CTO of the Opera browser. Or maybe even as the founder of the Pirate Party in Norway. Either way, he’s been around a while in this space, and knows what he’s talking about. Via Boing Boing we learn that: (1) Wium Lie has been sued for a completely absurd reason of (2) helping a site publish public domain court rulings that (3) are not even protected by a database right and (4) the judge ruled in favor of the plaintiff (5) in 24 hours (6) before Lie could respond and (7) ordered him to pay the legal fees of the other side.”

Techly: Tourists in Norway are being directed disastrously by Google Maps

Techly: Tourists in Norway are being directed disastrously by Google Maps. “Hundreds of tourists in Norway go on the search for the stunning Preikestolen cliff formation, better known as Pulpit Rock. Now unlike their predecessors, they opt for using trusty Google Maps, over an atlas to get them there. This has become a slight issue as Google Maps has proven to not be a reliable orienteer and instead is sending hundreds of tourists to the tiny village of Fossmork, 30 kilometres away from the actual cliffs.”

Google Buying Wind Farm Output – Even Before the Farms are Finished

They’re not built yet, but Google is buying power from wind farms in Norway and Sweden. “Norway’s Zephyr and Norsk Vind Energi said the 50-turbine, 160-megawatt capacity onshore Tellenes wind farm south of Stavanger is expected to be fully operational in late 2017, when it would become the largest wind farm in the country. In Sweden Google is buying power from a 22-turbine project near Mariestad, central Sweden, which will be completed by early 2018.”

In Development: A Digital Archive of Norse and Viking Culture

In development: an online archive of Norse and Viking culture. “Do you happen to have any Viking-related material lying around the house? Maybe a helmet or two, or a sword or dagger? Perhaps there’s a longboat buried in your garden. If so, or even if you have something a lot less dramatic to offer, you should get in touch with the World-Tree Project, which is being launched today by UCC’s school of English with the objective of creating the world’s largest online archive for the teaching and study of Norse and Viking cultures.”