Mashable: Why YouTubers are using vintage camcorders to feel something

Mashable: Why YouTubers are using vintage camcorders to feel something. “While cleaning out her apartment, Maddie Dragsbaek found her very first video camera. It’s a Sony Handycam that her parents gave her in 2009. She was in middle school at the time and uploading homemade music videos, skits, and vlogs to her then-fledgling YouTube channel. Roughly 10 years later, Dragsbaek now uses the same camera to document parts of her life for her 190,000 subscribers.”

The Conversation: What happens to your life stories if you delete your Facebook account?

The Conversation: What happens to your life stories if you delete your Facebook account?. “Millions of people have invested billions of collective hours building what scholars call a networked life narrative, in which people ‘co-construct’ their social identities through their interactions with one another. Perhaps you’ve never thought about how archiving the small moments of your life would eventually amass into a large narrative of yourself. Or how interactions from your family, friends, colleagues and strangers would create meaningful dimensions of that story.”

Hackaday: IRC Server For MS-DOS

Hackaday: IRC Server For MS-DOS . “The recent flurry of projects based around Internet Relay Chat (IRC) should be a fair indication that the beloved protocol is not going anywhere. Now, thanks to [Mike Chambers], you can add to the IRC ecosystem by hosting your very own MS-DOS based IRC server.” I had a PC XT that I had to use with a black and white TV because I couldn’t afford a real monitor. Sunday nostalgia: it’s real.

Autumn Christian: The Problem with Future Nostalgia

Autumn Christian: The Problem with Future Nostalgia. “Many of us millennials seem to be mourning not just the loss of the past, but the loss of an alternate future. There’s a feeling that maybe we had a bright hope but seemed to have taken a wrong turn at some point. That’s what things like vaporwave, futurefunk, and high-resolution pixel art seem to be conveying — not just looking toward the past, but toward the future we could have, by creating something of an alternative past. An alternate world where maybe we could have moved toward the collective dream we shared.”

New York Times: Go Ahead, Binge Old Movies and Jam Out to ’90s Hits

New York Times: Go Ahead, Binge Old Movies and Jam Out to ’90s Hits. “Some people swear by silent breakfasts. Others recommend breathing exercises. For another group of people, the ultimate coping mechanism for political angst and the pandemic is escaping into a world of yesteryear — listening to 1990s hits, watching old films and playing 16-bit video games. When everything has turned upside down, why not go back to a time when the world seemed simpler?”

New York Times: In Vintage TV Ads, a Curious Fountain of Hope (and Cheese)

New York Times: In Vintage TV Ads, a Curious Fountain of Hope (and Cheese). “Search YouTube with the word ‘commercials’ and the decade of your choosing, and you will find hundreds of compilations, including transfers of old broadcasts with everything but the advertisements and the breaking news updates edited out. I put on these compilations as background noise when I’m doing chores or eating dinner. It allows me to make believe that I live in a world I never got to inhabit but is still familiar, a time that seems simpler by virtue of the fact that it isn’t actively making me miserable.”

Wired: I Can’t Stop Escaping Into Google Photos’ Nostalgia Vortex

Wired: I Can’t Stop Escaping Into Google Photos’ Nostalgia Vortex . ” This spring, the coronavirus pandemic shut down college campuses and canceled gatherings across the country. For those of us so privileged that our only diagnosis is to stay home, long stretches of isolation and anxiety spirals still take a mental toll. The idea that there might be an escape hatch from the fear and grief many of us are feeling, however temporary, has never been more seductive. My own colleagues have found escapist respite in Animal Crossing and reality TV, ASMR and a Barbie Polaroid camera. On sleep-starved nights, I’ve tapped through each one of my apps, in search of solace within the safe perimeter of my phone screen. This was how I opened my long-dormant Google Photos app—and unleashed the most potent diversion of them all.”

Slate: The Insanely Popular App That Mimics Those Flimsy Disposable Cameras From the ’90s

Slate: The Insanely Popular App That Mimics Those Flimsy Disposable Cameras From the ’90s. “While the hazy, overexposed aesthetic of the photos it takes isn’t all that different from what you can achieve in with Instagram or VSCO, David’s Disposable ups the verisimilitude by simulating the most inconvenient aspects of using a disposable camera. Using the app requires you to squint at a minuscule virtual viewfinder. And after you take the picture, you can’t see the resulting image until 9 a.m. the next day, a feature premised on the assumption that what kids really admire about disposable cameras is the wait time for developing photos.”

Ars Technica: The best science and math moments in Sesame Street’s first 50 years

Ars Technica: The best science and math moments in Sesame Street’s first 50 years. “There was nothing on television like Sesame Street when it premiered 50 years ago, and the truth is, there’s still nothing quite like it now. (That’s a big reason why it was such a valuable acquisition for HBO in 2015.) Throughout the years, the show has always been on the front lines of what’s important to teach children. And as some of the show’s greatest hits demonstrate, long before educational advocates began popularizing the STEM acronym (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), Sesame Street was already there with silly characters promoting serious lessons.” I am always here for the pinball song. One two three FOUR FIVE six seven eight NINE TEN eleven twelve….

Wired: The Rise and Fall of Facebook’s Memory Economy

Wired: The Rise and Fall of Facebook’s Memory Economy . “Facebook’s Memories feature—where it shows you pictures and posts from a day in the recent or far-gone past—used to be my favorite thing about the platform. I mean, I have posted some hilarious things that my son said when he was little, and that time I went on a reporting trip to Area 51 was seriously cool. Heck, I’ve reposted it three years in a row. Now, though, I think Memories is the platform’s most cynical element. It’s a cheap ploy to keep us creating new posts, keep us interested, at a time when our interest is starting to drift away.”

Vintage mania: The race to buy vintage clothing on Instagram (theday)

theday: Vintage mania: The race to buy vintage clothing on Instagram . “It hadn’t been more than five minutes since Kaye Chapman had posted a photo of a vintage ’70s maxi dress to sell over her Instagram when she heard a response back. ‘How much? I need it,’ she read in her inbox. After responding with the price, another minute later, the client replied, ‘I’ll take it.’ And just like that, the dress was sold.”

Rediscovered memories on forgotten rolls of film: The Lost Rolls America project displays its trove (Los Angeles Times)

Los Angeles Times: Rediscovered memories on forgotten rolls of film: The Lost Rolls America project displays its trove. “Slightly faded and scratched, the image of a sailboat in Monterey Bay looks like countless vacation photos that might be boxed in the attic or sandwiched between pages of a scrapbook. The boat sits slightly off-center in the frame, its significance a mystery. The photographer might have explained it — but the film was misplaced at some point and Gabriel Berent had to wait almost 20 years to see that image and feel the flood of memories it evoked…Berent had heard about a project whose organizers were asking Americans to dig through their drawers and closets to find undeveloped rolls of film and send them in to be processed. Now his image is part of a national archive — christened Lost Rolls America — that includes hundreds rescued from obscurity.”