The Verge: Google’s Little Signals concepts show what ‘ambient’ notifications could look like

The Verge: Google’s Little Signals concepts show what ‘ambient’ notifications could look like. “Google has shown off a ‘design study’ in ambient computing, with a series of objects that can subtly deliver notifications through taps, gentle breezes, and shifting shadows (shout out to Verge alumn Dieter Bohn for tweeting this to our attention). The company calls the experiment Little Signals and says it’s exploring ‘calm computing,’ or ways of keeping you in the loop without having your phone blare a notification chime and light up a screen.”

Motherboard: Which of These Notification Sounds Gives You the Most Anxiety?

Motherboard: Which of These Notification Sounds Gives You the Most Anxiety?. “Busy Simulator is a web app that mimics the notification sounds for nine different platforms—Google Calendar, Slack, Microsoft Teams, Discord, Apple Mail, Outlook, iMessage, Google Chat, and Skype, plus a vibrating phone noise—to use when you need an excuse out of a meeting that is making you want to claw your eyes out.”

Mashable: How to set up Notification Summary in iOS 15

Mashable: How to set up Notification Summary in iOS 15. “If you get a million app notifications a day, and have become numb to the important ones, iOS 15’s Notification Summary feature is about to be your new best friend. Notification Summary will let you zero in on what you might call your ‘important-but-overwhelming-due-to-constant-pestering’ apps, and receive a summary report of their notifications for you to review at a time of your own choosing.”

SC Magazine: Breach alerts dismissed as junk? New guide for sending vital emails may help

SC Magazine: Breach alerts dismissed as junk? New guide for sending vital emails may help. “Bulk emails sent en masse to recipients can easily appear suspicious, but they may actually be legally required alerts informing customers about data breaches, privacy policy changes or product recalls. Some may instruct recipients to change their passwords or subscribe to a credit monitoring service. Even customers who no longer use a particular company’s services, or have unsubscribed from its marketing communications, or have set emails from that company as spam must still receive these so-called ‘mandatory’ emails. And so it is imperative that senders follow guidelines that make their vital communications as secure and trustworthy as possible.”

Neowin: This free app lets you bring back Google Play update notifications

Neowin: This free app lets you bring back Google Play update notifications. “In a bid to reduce the unnecessary notification clutter, the Google Play app no longer shows notifications after app updates have been installed. While this may not be a considerable factor for many users, it is expected that some people would still prefer to be notified after the successful installation of apps on their phones. Reddit user u/farmerbb decided to take the matter into his hands and wrote an app to restore Google Play’s missing app update notifications.”

Wired: Facebook Notification Spam Has Crossed The Line

Wired: Facebook Notification Spam Has Crossed The Line. “FACEBOOK HAS ALWAYS nudged truant users back to its platform though emails and notifications. But recently, those prods have evolved beyond comments related to activity on your own profile. Now Facebook will nag you when an acquaintance comments on someone else’s photo, or when a distant family member updates their status. The spamming has even extended to those who sign up for two-factor authentication—which is a great way to turn people off to that extra layer of security.”