Asahi Shimbun: More images of Hiroshima after war found in foreign archives

Asahi Shimbun: More images of Hiroshima after war found in foreign archives. “The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum here Oct. 10 released a batch of photos previously unknown in Japan of this city’s devastation soon after the 1945 atomic bombing. The 32 images taken during the Allied occupation were discovered in archives in the United States and New Zealand.”

The Mainichi: Digital archive launched to share stories of A-bomb survivors living across Japan

The Mainichi:Digital archive launched to share stories of A-bomb survivors living across Japan . “A non-profit organization has launched a digital archive of the experiences of atomic-bomb survivors no longer living in Hiroshima and Nagasaki prefectures.”

Signal: Social Media Helps Detect Nuclear Agreement Violations

Signal: Social Media Helps Detect Nuclear Agreement Violations. “Researchers at North Carolina (NC) State University have developed a new computational model that draws on normally incompatible data sets, such as satellite imagery and social media posts, to answer questions about what is happening in targeted locations. The model identifies violations of nuclear nonproliferation agreements. The data can include traditional sources, such as Geiger counter readings or multispectral data from satellite imagery, but many may be nontraditional and diverse, including Flickr and Twitter posts.”

PR Newswire: First of Its Kind Web Tool Lets You Know if You’re Funding Gun Violence and War (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: First of Its Kind Web Tool Lets You Know if You’re Funding Gun Violence and War (PRESS RELEASE). “Weapon Free Funds, covering 3,000 of the most commonly-owned U.S. mutual funds from major asset managers like Vanguard, Fidelity and BlackRock, allows investors to find out if their mutual fund investments are being used to finance makers of military weapons and civilian firearms, and to find alternative, socially-responsible options that avoid the war economy. Investors can easily see how their investments support major military contractors, cluster munitions (banned in 100+ countries), nuclear weapons, gun manufacturers and gun retailers.”

CNET: You can now watch 62 newly declassified nuclear test videos

CNET: You can now watch 62 newly declassified nuclear test videos. “Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California made a stir earlier this year when it released a group of Cold War-era atmospheric nuclear test videos that were declassified and approved for public viewing. We now have a sequel that’s just as devastating to watch as the first round. The laboratory’s latest batch includes 62 videos posted on Thursday.”

United Nations: United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs Launches the Disarmament Digital Documents Library

United Nations: United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs Launches the Disarmament Digital Documents Library. “The Disarmament Digital Documents Library is a specialised archive that provides quick and easy access to an extensive collection of United Nations disarmament-related documents in one convenient location. It includes historical documents of the first General Assembly session and reports from the Special Sessions on Disarmament (SSOD-I, SSOD-II and SSOD-III), disarmament-related meetings and conferences, and treaty review declarations.”

The Diplomat: Every North Korean Missile Launch Since 1984 Visualized

The Diplomat: Every North Korean Missile Launch Since 1984 Visualized. “…the Nuclear Threat Initiative has published a new database to help make sense of North Korea’s pace and breadth of testing and to keep track of the precise systems Pyongyang is developing. Prepared by Shea Cotton, a research associate at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies in Monterey, California, the database offers the most complete public dataset on North Korean missile launches, going all the way back to North Korea’s first series of Scud-B tests in 1984 under Kim Il-sung.”