Los Alamos National Laboratory: Bradbury Science Museum launches online archives with Manhattan Project science and history

Los Alamos National Laboratory: Bradbury Science Museum launches online archives with Manhattan Project science and history. “The Bradbury Science Museum premiered its online artifacts collection with images of groundbreaking science and history of the Manhattan Project, which developed the world’s first atomic bombs at Los Alamos Laboratory that helped to end World War II.”

Cornell University: Einaudi program promotes nuclear freeze movement’s legacy

Cornell University: Einaudi program promotes nuclear freeze movement’s legacy. “Forty years ago this month, disarmament advocate and researcher Randall Caroline Watson Forsberg told peace activists assembled for Mobilization for Survival’s annual meeting that a bilateral nuclear arms freeze ‘could change the world.’ Forsberg’s vision launched a powerful local- and state-level grassroots lobby for a U.S.-Soviet nuclear arms freeze in the 1980s.”

Berkeley News: New online strategy game advances the science of nuclear security

Berkeley News: New online strategy game advances the science of nuclear security. “Love military strategy games like Risk and Diplomacy? Try SIGNAL, a new online game that lets you satisfy your appetite for virtual global domination while simultaneously helping researchers understand the risks of real-world nuclear conflict.”

NHK World: Atomic bomb publications database released online

NHK World: Atomic bomb publications database released online. “The project was organized by LinguaHiroshima, a group of researchers based in the city of Kure in Hiroshima Prefecture. The group’s website offers a list of about 3,500 writings published in a total of 75 languages. The database includes the works’ title, author and date of publication.”

The Guardian: British nuclear archive files withdrawn without explanation

The Guardian: British nuclear archive files withdrawn without explanation. “A vast cache of material dating from 1939 until the 1980s and including more than 1,700 files about the creation of Britain’s first nuclear bombs at Aldermaston has been unexpectedly withdrawn by the National Archives within the last week, researchers have reported.”

Asahi Shimbun: More images of Hiroshima after war found in foreign archives

Asahi Shimbun: More images of Hiroshima after war found in foreign archives. “The Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum here Oct. 10 released a batch of photos previously unknown in Japan of this city’s devastation soon after the 1945 atomic bombing. The 32 images taken during the Allied occupation were discovered in archives in the United States and New Zealand.”

The Mainichi: Digital archive launched to share stories of A-bomb survivors living across Japan

The Mainichi:Digital archive launched to share stories of A-bomb survivors living across Japan . “A non-profit organization has launched a digital archive of the experiences of atomic-bomb survivors no longer living in Hiroshima and Nagasaki prefectures.”

Signal: Social Media Helps Detect Nuclear Agreement Violations

Signal: Social Media Helps Detect Nuclear Agreement Violations. “Researchers at North Carolina (NC) State University have developed a new computational model that draws on normally incompatible data sets, such as satellite imagery and social media posts, to answer questions about what is happening in targeted locations. The model identifies violations of nuclear nonproliferation agreements. The data can include traditional sources, such as Geiger counter readings or multispectral data from satellite imagery, but many may be nontraditional and diverse, including Flickr and Twitter posts.”

PR Newswire: First of Its Kind Web Tool Lets You Know if You’re Funding Gun Violence and War (PRESS RELEASE)

PR Newswire: First of Its Kind Web Tool Lets You Know if You’re Funding Gun Violence and War (PRESS RELEASE). “Weapon Free Funds, covering 3,000 of the most commonly-owned U.S. mutual funds from major asset managers like Vanguard, Fidelity and BlackRock, allows investors to find out if their mutual fund investments are being used to finance makers of military weapons and civilian firearms, and to find alternative, socially-responsible options that avoid the war economy. Investors can easily see how their investments support major military contractors, cluster munitions (banned in 100+ countries), nuclear weapons, gun manufacturers and gun retailers.”

CNET: You can now watch 62 newly declassified nuclear test videos

CNET: You can now watch 62 newly declassified nuclear test videos. “Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California made a stir earlier this year when it released a group of Cold War-era atmospheric nuclear test videos that were declassified and approved for public viewing. We now have a sequel that’s just as devastating to watch as the first round. The laboratory’s latest batch includes 62 videos posted on Thursday.”

United Nations: United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs Launches the Disarmament Digital Documents Library

United Nations: United Nations Office for Disarmament Affairs Launches the Disarmament Digital Documents Library. “The Disarmament Digital Documents Library is a specialised archive that provides quick and easy access to an extensive collection of United Nations disarmament-related documents in one convenient location. It includes historical documents of the first General Assembly session and reports from the Special Sessions on Disarmament (SSOD-I, SSOD-II and SSOD-III), disarmament-related meetings and conferences, and treaty review declarations.”

The Diplomat: Every North Korean Missile Launch Since 1984 Visualized

The Diplomat: Every North Korean Missile Launch Since 1984 Visualized. “…the Nuclear Threat Initiative has published a new database to help make sense of North Korea’s pace and breadth of testing and to keep track of the precise systems Pyongyang is developing. Prepared by Shea Cotton, a research associate at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies in Monterey, California, the database offers the most complete public dataset on North Korean missile launches, going all the way back to North Korea’s first series of Scud-B tests in 1984 under Kim Il-sung.”

LLNL: Physicist declassifies rescued nuclear test films

From the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, with a big tip o’ the nib to Esther S: Physicist declassifies rescued nuclear test films. “The U.S. conducted 210 atmospheric nuclear tests between 1945 and 1962, with multiple cameras capturing each event at around 2,400 frames per second…. For the past five years, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) weapon physicist Greg Spriggs and a crack team of film experts, archivists and software developers have been on a mission to hunt down, scan, reanalyze and declassify these decomposing films… Around 4,200 films have been scanned, 400 to 500 have been reanalyzed and around 750 have been declassified. An initial set of these declassified films — tests conducted by LLNL — were published today in an LLNL YouTube playlist (link is external).”

Hoover Institution Releases Audio Recordings From Bikini Atoll Nuclear Tests

Hoover Institution has released audio recordings from 1940s nuclear tests. “The recordings, part of Hoover’s United States Foreign Broadcast Intelligence Service records, detail the preparation, process, and aftermath of the nuclear testing known seventy years ago as ‘Operation Crossroads.’ Since the first detonation on July 1, 1946, the Bikini Atoll tests have become emblematic of the dawn of the nuclear age and the beginning of the Cold War.”

Site Explores Impact of Nuclear Weapons Testing on Utah Residents

Now available: A site tracking and timelining the effects that the nuclear weapons testing of the 1950s had on the people living “downwind” in Utah. Strangely some of the things presented on the site’s timeline are only available via University of Utah resources (an article available through ProQuest, for example.) There are enough “open” resources, however, to make the site worth a visit.