Introducing FathomNet: New open-source image database unlocks the power of AI for ocean exploration (MBARI)

Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute: Introducing FathomNet: New open-source image database unlocks the power of AI for ocean exploration. “As scientists and engineers develop advanced robotics that can visualize marine life and environments to monitor changes in the ocean’s health, they face a fundamental problem: The collection of images, video, and other visual data vastly exceeds researchers’ capacity for analysis. FathomNet is an open-source image database that uses state-of-the-art data processing algorithms to help process the backlog of visual data.”

FathomNet: A global image database for enabling artificial intelligence in the ocean (Nature)

Nature: FathomNet: A global image database for enabling artificial intelligence in the ocean. “Recent advances in machine learning enables fast, sophisticated analysis of visual data, but have had limited success in the ocean due to lack of data standardization, insufficient formatting, and demand for large, labeled datasets. To address this need, we built FathomNet, an open-source image database that standardizes and aggregates expertly curated labeled data.”

Deeper Blue: A New Database Shows How Sharks Use The Ocean’s Depths

Deeper Blue: A New Database Shows How Sharks Use The Ocean’s Depths. “While some species spend their entire lives in shallow waters close to shore on the continental shelf, others plunge hundreds of meters or more off the slope waters into the twilight zone, beyond where sunlight penetrates. This new understanding of how elasmobranchs — the scientific word for sharks, rays and skates — use the ocean will enable policymakers and resource managers the opportunity to examine the threats these animals face, and guide future management and conservation plans.”

NOAA: Back to school: Find NOAA resources with our new online database

New-to-me, from NOAA: Back to school: Find NOAA resources with our new online database . “With a new school year just around the corner, teachers and educators are gearing up to create lesson plans and find engaging activities for their students. We have a tool to make it easier than ever to include NOAA resources in your classroom: NOAA Sea to Sky, a new education resource database that houses over 1,200 educational resources created by NOAA and our partners.”

New Zealand Herald: New Zealand tsunami database details history of monster waves and lost settlements

New Zealand Herald: New Zealand tsunami database details history of monster waves and lost settlements. “Monster 12-metre waves, an entire settlement swept out to sea, and a bridge lifted and dumped a kilometre upriver are a few examples of the might of tsunami that have struck New Zealand in the last two centuries. Toka Tū Ake EQC and GNS Science have combed hundreds of years worth of historical tsunami data to create a new public resource, detailing all recorded tsunamis since 1835.”

Engadget: Almost a quarter of the ocean floor is now mapped

Engadget: Almost a quarter of the ocean floor is now mapped. “Roughly 25 percent (23.4 percent to be exact) of the Earth’s sea floor has been mapped, thanks to an international initiative known as Seabed 2030. Relying largely on voluntary contributions of bathymetric data (or ocean topography) by governments, companies and research institutions, the project is part of a larger UN-led initiative called The Ocean Decade.”

British Library: One-Fifth of the World’s Surface

British Library: One-Fifth of the World’s Surface. “One-Fifth of the Earth’s Surface is a digital audio-visual, multimedia web experience by artists Hakeem Adam and Maxwell Mutanda. Commissioned by Abandon Normal Devices and York Mediale, the work is, as the title suggests, an exploration of the ‘power of water as a dynamic and fluid archive’ with the Atlantic Ocean its main subject.”

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Major Ocean-Observing Satellite Starts Providing Science Data

NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory: Major Ocean-Observing Satellite Starts Providing Science Data. “After six months of check-out and calibration in orbit, the Sentinel-6 Michael Freilich satellite will make its first two data streams available to the public on June 22. It launched from Vandenberg Air Force Base in California on Nov. 21, 2020, and is a U.S.-European collaboration to measure sea surface height and other key ocean features, such as ocean surface wind speed and wave height.”

World Economic Forum: This innovative project fuses journalism and music to highlight lawlessness at sea

World Economic Forum: This innovative project fuses journalism and music to highlight lawlessness at sea. ” All of that time spent at sea allowed me to build an audio library of field recordings. It featured a variety of textured and rhythmic sounds like machine-gun fire off the coast of Somalia and chanting captive deckhands on the South China Sea. Using the sound archive and inspired by the reporting, over 400 artists from more than 60 countries are producing EPs in their own interpretive musical styles, be it electronic, ambient, classical or hip-hop. Many artists also used the reported footage to make their own videos tied to their song, including Louis Futon, Roger Molls, and De Osos.” This is really good. Major timesink.

NOAA: The Global Drifter Program Launches a New Interactive Map Tool

NOAA: The Global Drifter Program Launches a New Interactive Map Tool. “Drifters are deployed in the global ocean to measure sea surface temperature and ocean currents, but most are also equipped to measure other variables. As the drifter moves around, guided by currents, measurements of atmospheric pressure, winds, wave spectra, and salinity can also be taken. These data are collected by sensors in the drifter and transmitted to overhead satellites. Tracking the location of drifters over time allows scientists to build a profile of ocean currents.”

From Neal Agarwal: The Deep Sea

Big thanks to Shirl K. for this one — The Deep Sea. There’s not really a description I can quote from. It’s an illustration of the sea. You keep scrolling down and down while the page shows you some creatures who live at that depth. You keep going lower, and lower, and even when you think you’re at the end you’re not. I think it’s the physical act of scrolling that “makes it click,” when it comes to understanding just how deep the ocean is. Highly recommended.

Business News Australia: Melbourne startup unveils ocean floor ‘Street View’ submarine

Business News Australia: Melbourne startup unveils ocean floor ‘Street View’ submarine. “Emerging Melbourne tech startup UAM Tec (Underwater Autonomous Mapping Technology) has revealed its first product, dubbed Google Maps Street View for the ocean floor…. The submarine will generate publicly accessible maps of the ocean floor which UAM Tec hope can be used for research purposes.”

TechCrunch: Autonomous ‘Mayflower’ research ship will use IBM AI tech to cross the Atlantic in 2020

TechCrunch: Autonomous ‘Mayflower’ research ship will use IBM AI tech to cross the Atlantic in 2020. “A fully autonomous ship called the ‘Mayflower’ will make its voyage across the Atlantic Ocean next September, to mark the 400-year anniversary of the trip of the first Mayflower, which was very much not autonomous. It’s a stark way to drive home just how much technology has advanced in the last four centuries, but also a key demonstration of autonomous seafaring technology, put together by marine research and exploration organization Promare and powered by IBM technology.”

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world. “The Interactiveoceans website takes you deep into the ocean, offering data on light, temperature and a whole host of other variables collected by more than 140 instruments throughout the water column and along the seafloor. It offers recordings of mammal vocalizations and video from underwater hot springs where never-before-seen organisms live. It introduces the technology and the instruments being used on the Regional Cabled Array, with data streaming to shore through fiber optic cables at the speed of broadband Internet.”

National Geographic: Do We Know Enough About The Deep Sea To Mine It?

National Geographic: Do We Know Enough About The Deep Sea To Mine It?. “The United Nations organisation [International Seabed Authority (ISA)] headquartered in Kingston, Jamaica, is charged with promoting the mining of the ocean floor while, contradictorily, ensuring its protection. That’s about to change. As the ISA meets this month to draft regulations to allow mining to begin, it is set to unveil a public database that contains all environmental data reported by the miners since 2001. For the first time, scientists will be able to analyse the quantity and quality of that information and determine if mining contractors have complied with ISA rules.”