From Neal Agarwal: The Deep Sea

Big thanks to Shirl K. for this one — The Deep Sea. There’s not really a description I can quote from. It’s an illustration of the sea. You keep scrolling down and down while the page shows you some creatures who live at that depth. You keep going lower, and lower, and even when you think you’re at the end you’re not. I think it’s the physical act of scrolling that “makes it click,” when it comes to understanding just how deep the ocean is. Highly recommended.

Business News Australia: Melbourne startup unveils ocean floor ‘Street View’ submarine

Business News Australia: Melbourne startup unveils ocean floor ‘Street View’ submarine. “Emerging Melbourne tech startup UAM Tec (Underwater Autonomous Mapping Technology) has revealed its first product, dubbed Google Maps Street View for the ocean floor…. The submarine will generate publicly accessible maps of the ocean floor which UAM Tec hope can be used for research purposes.”

TechCrunch: Autonomous ‘Mayflower’ research ship will use IBM AI tech to cross the Atlantic in 2020

TechCrunch: Autonomous ‘Mayflower’ research ship will use IBM AI tech to cross the Atlantic in 2020. “A fully autonomous ship called the ‘Mayflower’ will make its voyage across the Atlantic Ocean next September, to mark the 400-year anniversary of the trip of the first Mayflower, which was very much not autonomous. It’s a stark way to drive home just how much technology has advanced in the last four centuries, but also a key demonstration of autonomous seafaring technology, put together by marine research and exploration organization Promare and powered by IBM technology.”

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world

University of Washington: New portal takes you deep within the ocean’s hidden world. “The Interactiveoceans website takes you deep into the ocean, offering data on light, temperature and a whole host of other variables collected by more than 140 instruments throughout the water column and along the seafloor. It offers recordings of mammal vocalizations and video from underwater hot springs where never-before-seen organisms live. It introduces the technology and the instruments being used on the Regional Cabled Array, with data streaming to shore through fiber optic cables at the speed of broadband Internet.”

National Geographic: Do We Know Enough About The Deep Sea To Mine It?

National Geographic: Do We Know Enough About The Deep Sea To Mine It?. “The United Nations organisation [International Seabed Authority (ISA)] headquartered in Kingston, Jamaica, is charged with promoting the mining of the ocean floor while, contradictorily, ensuring its protection. That’s about to change. As the ISA meets this month to draft regulations to allow mining to begin, it is set to unveil a public database that contains all environmental data reported by the miners since 2001. For the first time, scientists will be able to analyse the quantity and quality of that information and determine if mining contractors have complied with ISA rules.”

EurekAlert: Mapping the ocean’s unseen heroes, one microbe at a time

EurekAlert: Mapping the ocean’s unseen heroes, one microbe at a time. “Invisible to the naked eye, the health and movement of marine microbes that drift as part of the plankton is difficult to picture even for scientists – let alone everyday citizens. This challenge, to visualise the range of conditions that drifting marine microbes encounter, brought a group of expert scientists and visual designers together on a path to create the online citizen science project Adrift. Adrift is a portal that connects the public with the lives of microscopic marine microbes as they are propelled around the globe by ocean currents, with temperature and nutrient availability changing along the way.”

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management: New OceanReports Tool Brings Ocean Data to Your Fingertips

Bureau of Ocean Energy Management: New OceanReports Tool Brings Ocean Data to Your Fingertips . “U.S. ocean waters comprise nearly four million square miles and are one of the largest Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) in the world. Now, when you outline any area in the U.S. EEZ using the OceanReports app, you can get detailed information about habitats and species, industries at work, potential hazards such as undersea cables or shipwrecks, economic value of ocean commerce, and detailed oceanographic information.”

Sea Grant North Carolina: New Mapping Tool Identifies Sites for Re-establishing Oyster Reefs

Sea Grant North Carolina: New Mapping Tool Identifies Sites for Re-establishing Oyster Reefs. “Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a mapping tool that identifies sites for re-establishing oyster reefs that maximize their ecological benefits — such as water filtration. This Geographic Information Systems (GIS)-based tool could inform restoration of other vital, sensitive coastal habitats.”

Atlas Obscura: You Can Now Eavesdrop on Orcas on Your Computer

Atlas Obscura: You Can Now Eavesdrop on Orcas on Your Computer . “An internet app called OrcaSound allows citizen scientists to livestream the ocean sounds of the Pacific Northwest from anywhere in the world, to help gather data about the resident killer whales and their environs. Scott Veirs, the project’s lead researcher, said that hydrophones (underwater microphones) have been in place off Washington’s San Juan Island since the mid-2000s, capturing the submarine goings-on and bringing them to listeners in a rudimentary form. The app relaunched recently, and now offers real-time streaming, as well as sounds from an all-new hydrophone station off Whidbey Island, just to the southeast of the the older ones.”

Scoop New Zealand: Handwritten files provide sediment treasure chest

Scoop New Zealand: Handwritten files provide sediment treasure chest. “Marine geologist Dr Helen Bostock has created a new seabed sediment database for New Zealand’s Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) and extended continental shelf. The database, called nzSEABED, provides information on the percentage of mud, sand and gravel contained in seafloor sediment, which she has used to produce charts plotting their distribution.”

The Verge: Nautilus lets you watch their ocean expeditions live

The Verge: Nautilus lets you watch their ocean expeditions live. “The Nautilus is a research vehicle operated by the Ocean Exploration Trust, a nonprofit founded by Robert Ballard, one of the people who helped us find the Titanic. It conducts scientific research and offers live video and audio streams to those of us who are unable to come along. This year, it’ll journey along the western part of North America, from British Columbia to the Hawaiian islands. Right now, it’s exploring the Lōihi Seamount, an active underwater volcano near Hawaii.”

ISSD: Fisheries Statistics, Ocean Database to Support Marine Resource Management

ISSD: Fisheries Statistics, Ocean Database to Support Marine Resource Management. “The UN Environment Programme (UNEP, or UN Environment) World Conservation Monitoring Centre (WCMC) launched Ocean+Data, an online library of ocean-related data resources meant to inform decision making. In parallel, the Asia-Pacific Commission on Agricultural Statistics launched the Pacific Strategic Plan for Agricultural and Fisheries Statistics (P-SPAFS). Both data collection mechanisms were announced as the UK published a report calling for improved data collection to support a growing ocean economy.”

Quartz: Despite global warming, some reefs are flourishing, and you can see it in 3D

Quartz: Despite global warming, some reefs are flourishing, and you can see it in 3D. “The videos themselves are an astonishing and important part of the project. Although the corals look computer generated, the videos represent actual reef systems shot with off the shelf DSLR cameras. They are assembled from as many as 4000 photographs, shot by divers who swim lawnmower patterns over the reef, snapping a picture every second. The images are then run through a software process called photogrammetry, which stitches the images together into a 3-dimensional whole, allowing the viewer to glide across the reef with resolution down to one centimeter.”