CNET: Mozilla is sharing YouTube horror stories to prod Google for more transparency

CNET: Mozilla is sharing YouTube horror stories to prod Google for more transparency. “Mozilla is publishing anecdotes of YouTube viewing gone awry — anonymous stories from people who say they innocently searched one thing but eventually ended up in a dark rabbit hole of videos. It’s a campaign aimed at pressuring Google’s massive video site to make itself more accessible to independent researchers trying to study its algorithms.”

BBC: Instagram apologises after censoring London fishmonger

BBC: Instagram apologises after censoring London fishmonger. “Instagram says a video of a shop display posted by a London-based fishmonger was accidentally flagged as containing offensive material. Rex Goldsmith said it was the second time in two weeks that one of his posts had been greyed-out, with a warning message placed over the top.”

The Verge: YouTube’s CEO explains why it leaves up ‘controversial or even offensive’ videos

The Verge: YouTube’s CEO explains why it leaves up ‘controversial or even offensive’ videos. “The concerns around YouTube moderation aren’t going away anytime soon. YouTube is still developing and revising policies to prevent major issues — its updated creator-on-creator harassment policy is still in the works, for instance — and bad actors will continue to push against the limits of those rules.”

Gizmodo: Why Can’t YouTube Do ‘Good’ Content Moderation? Answer: Because It’s F*cking Impossible (Techdirt)

Techdirt: Gizmodo: Why Can’t YouTube Do ‘Good’ Content Moderation? Answer: Because It’s F*cking Impossible . Asterisk added by me. “There is simply no world in which YouTube both successfully eliminates all, or even the majority, of speech that some large group or another considers hate speech or ‘extreme.’ That’s never going to happen. YouTube never should have suggested it would happen. The screw up here is YouTube not properly setting the public’s expectations as to what its policy would achieve. Yeah, there is still a good deal of extremist content on YouTube. Whipping up anger at content that’s available at this moment is trivially easy.”

The Daily Progress: Archivists group criticizes Hollins for removing yearbooks from digital archive

The Daily Progress: Archivists group criticizes Hollins for removing yearbooks from digital archive. “A national group of archivists is urging Hollins University to immediately restore its full online collection of old campus yearbooks. The appeal, issued Wednesday, comes one day after the university announced that it was temporarily pulling four annals from its digital archives after an internal review found instances of blackface and other offensive imagery.”

New York Times: Advertisers Boycott YouTube After Pedophiles Swarm Comments on Videos of Children

New York Times: Advertisers Boycott YouTube After Pedophiles Swarm Comments on Videos of Children. “Nestlé, Epic Games and other major brands said on Wednesday that they had stopped buying advertisements on YouTube after their ads appeared on children’s videos where pedophiles had infiltrated the comment sections.” Just a little over a month after AT&T returned to YouTube after yanking its advertising over offensive videos.

New York Times: AT&T to Advertise on YouTube Again After a Nearly 2-Year Holdout

New York Times: AT&T to Advertise on YouTube Again After a Nearly 2-Year Holdout. “AT&T thinks YouTube is safe for advertisers again. The company, one of the nation’s biggest marketers, yanked its dollars from YouTube in 2017 because its ads were appearing alongside offensive videos. But on Friday, AT&T said it had been persuaded to resume advertising on the video platform.”

CNET: Facebook’s and social media’s fight against fake news may get tougher

CNET: Facebook’s and social media’s fight against fake news may get tougher. “The shift toward ephemeral content and messaging could fundamentally alter how we use Facebook and other social media, while also making it harder to combat misinformation, election interference and hate speech, some experts say. After all, it’s hard for companies to crack down when they can’t see what’s being shared in encrypted messages, or when photos and videos disappear after 24 hours. And while Facebook and others are investing in AI to spot and remove messages that violate their online rules, they still face a tough road ahead.”

The Verge: The year of deleted tweets

The Verge: The year of deleted tweets. “In July, Disney fired Guardians of the Galaxy director James Gunn. Cause for termination: a series of offensive tweets, in most cases about a decade old, that were circulated by a right-wing media personality. Gunn’s tweets, many of which were about molestation or pedophilia, were indefensible. But the method in which they were dug up, as well as the people who circulated them — bad-faith conspiracy theorists who used old jokes made in poor taste to brand Gunn as a pedophile — are part of a larger trend in which problematic or out-of-context tweets are being ripped from the past to ruin their author in the present.”

CNET: WhatsApp under fire for failing to remove child porn

CNET: WhatsApp under fire for failing to remove child porn. “Facebook-owned WhatsApp is being criticized for failing to curb the spread of child pornography on the messaging app. A report by two Israeli online safety groups, Netivei Reshet and Screensaverz, concluded that it was easy to find WhatsApp groups in which people shared images and videos of children being sexually abused.”